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Volume TU 






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IKaShsrlns 21, :££alm 



The Btout Institute 

la affffrttonfly 

dedicated 



Ssssitaui: 



stn&matB, faculty autl 
falfei mi Institute :~ 

Sractlao*. 

May yon Had pleasure la our -wroxlc. 



I5>1S £J-io-u-£ J-liiimaJ So 




L. I). Harvey. B. a.. Ph. d. 

Preaidmnt ol The Stout Innlitutc P»ycholojJj 



Z., ~\., Ph. D. 

DRESIDENT HARVEY started hi* career an a teach- 
A .i- in district and in village graded schools. 1 1 « - 
has held positions as city superintendenl <>i* schools, 
and as a member of two boards of education In cities 
of this state. After completing a term aa president 
of the Milwaukee S'6rmal School, he was elected i<> 
the office of state superintendenl of schools. Since 
that time he has been president of the Sinn Train- 
ing Schools and of The Stoul Institute. 

The Wisconsin State Legislature appointed him 
as ;i commissioner i<> investigate and report on In- 
dustrial Education in the rural communities. Later 
he was made chairman of a committee to investigate 
and report to the National Council <>i" Education on 
i he same au bject . 

President Harvey has held several positions of 
responsibility in local, state, and national educational 
associations, having been president of tin- Wisconsin 
Teachers' Association, twice president of the Li- 
bran Department, and once of the Department of 
Superintendence of the National Educational Associ- 
ation and president of the entire Association. 

During the past fifteen years, he has given spe- 
cial attention to the subject of Industrial Education 
in it- man; phases: he has introduced many courses 
into the curriculum in anticipation <>f the develop- 
ment and growth of industrial education in the 
schools of the country . 

As a realization of his efforts in In-half of The 
Stout Institute, we have the new Trade Building and 
shall ha\c wry shortly the Household Arts Building; 

assets which will assure the Institute of its place OS 

the foremost training school of it- type in the coun- 
try. This position which Stout lias attained is hut 
a worthy tribute of the strong personality and pro- 
gressive spirit of its president. Lorenzo I). Harvey. 




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•53 




LENNA (J. BAKER 
Physiology, Borne Kursing 
State Normal School, Whitewater, 1907; Stoul Institute 11'lit 

pablio schools, 11MI?-l!M«) : i 



.ahools, |907-1009i leaah 
I ... ii. \\ ashinifton, 1910-101 I - 



Toucher 
lomcstic science, Ii i ij l> school, 
' Institute, 1912- 



CLARA LOUISE BOUGHTON 
Advanced Cookery, Food Study 



State Normal School, Milwaukee 
Teacher in public schools, Mai 
science, K.,. ■;,,... 1910-1011; Stoul 



IS90-1K93; Stoul Institute, 1909-1910. 
utowoc, 1803-1909; director domestic 
Institute, I'M 1- 



GEORGE FRED BUXTON 

Director ol Manual Training, Organization <»i* 

Manual Training, Drawing and Design 




BERTHA BI8BEY 

Dietetics, Advanced Cookery 

Prnv-'S* 1 ""; N """' : - l SHr , J21» u ' rammwM 

i 1Vi^,'.'"1, V"""' ,| "- 1 ", 1 -' Teacher publi< schools, lima. Kan.. 
1900-1903; Manl DON; >.-,.. I , : ol mathematics. K 

state Agricultural < ollefie, Manhattan, Kan., Stoul Institute, 1912- 

A. II. BROWN 
Wood Finishing 

Ten years' experienca ,•. painter and decoratori I en •• 

experience t.< w.kic! fi„ nutomohilc nn< 

■hops. Stoul Institute, 1911- 

OTTO E. BRUNKOW 
Architectural Drawing, Freehand Drawing and Design 

of Illinois, architecture, 1911-1912; Stoul Institute, 1913 
Four yean experience In carpentrj and architectural draw- 

ing* Stoul Institute, 1913- 

Thomas CHRISTOFFEL 
Cabinet Production 

Three years' apprenticeship in cal inel making and inside finathlnd Hrorh 
in Switzerland; Swiss diploma in cabinet making. 1005; journeyman in 
bwitxerlnml. I0O.1-19O7; prnclical mill work and cabinet making . 

'i.m'V ,.iVi X l'"""r"' I!M,r -, 1 .'', 1 , : Special studj ... s,..,.. Institute. 
1913-1914; Stoul Institute, 1914- 

FRED L. CURRAN 
Elementary Woodwork, Upper Grade Woodwork. 
History •>!" Manual Training 

§*■*?, Nornjnl s. i Stevens Point, Wla., \:>'<:-, sn.,,1 Institute, 1908: 

Bradley Polytechnic Institute, hi mmcr* IOCS. 1900. Teacher in public 
schools. IK9K-1003; principal slate graded nchools. I00o-190?; Stoul 
Inatitute, 1908- 

('.HACK H. DARLING 
Ilniiu- and Social Economics 




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Sixteen 



GRACE M. now 
Institutional Management 

Si. Paul Teachers' Training Bohool. 1897; University of Minneoota, nun- 
mar ■eaaion. l'.UO; Stool institute, UMI. Teaohor En public Mohoola. 
St. Paul, 1807-1896; Stou t Inatitute, 1 •» 1 1 - 



ELEANOR M. DUNN 
Food Study, Senior Cookery 

Whitewater Normal Bol I. Vmh;- Milton College, l!Mtv-i!Hnt : Stout In- 

Mtituto, 1!U!. High School inatruotor, 1906-1908, 1909-1911; dircotor of 
household arts, Stiit«- Normal Sohool, warrensburii, Mo., l!U.'l-191l; 
Si,, ut Institute, 101 1- 

SKI.MA KUK SON 
Trade Dressmaking 

Praotioal work in drt— i making apprentice, employee, and "hop man- 
ager, 1901-1908; designer and fit tor for commercial houees, 1908-1912- 
1911. Teacher in tl>< - Milwaukee Sohool of Trade for Girls, iwi.'i; Stout 
institute, 1!M t- 

CHAS. K. ESLINGEK 
Printing, Primary Handwork, industrial Literature 

Stout Institute, 1912, Four years' experience bn praotioal printer, teaoh- 
••r of printing and primary IuhhIwoi-k. Stout Institute, 1912- 



LOUISE PHILLIPS GLANTON 
Supervision «>f Practice Teaching 

llnrlii- College, Some, Ga., A. It.; Columbia University, I*. S», and di- 

ftloma Teaehers' Colloge. Critic, third grade, Speyer nchool, Teaoheni 
>ollege a UMKj-liMis; superintendent Kasaau industrial sohool, Lawrence, 
l.oiii.- Island, 1909-1910: director domestic Noienoe department, public 
Kohools, Montgomery, Ala., 1910-1912; Stout Institute, 1912- 



JAMES T. GREGERSON 
Joinery, Elementary Cabinet Making, Patten 



Making 



Clasa for Industrial Teachers at Milwaukee, 1912-1913; Univenuty of Wis- 
consin Extension Division, Unlvorsity of Wisconsin, 1913-1914. Kleven 
years' experience in various branches of pattern work; instructor in 
elementary woodworking, ITnivemity of Wisconsin, Hummer Msmion, 
1914. Stout Institute, 191 1- 

1IKNKY <). GRUBERT 
Wood Turning 

Served apprenticeship in German wood turning hIiodm; fifteen years' 
experience in all grades of wood turning 1 -.ix years experience in turning 
ii.ini rubber, bone, ivory, and amber; five years' experience n-. shop 
manager. Stout Inatitute, 1913- 



<>. C. HAACK 
Cabinet Making, Mill Work 

The Stout Inatitute, 1914. Practical experience in cabinet making and 
carpentry. Stout Inatitute, 1IUI- 














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1& 



GLADYS T. II \KVKY 

I nterior Decoral ion 

University of Wiaoonain, 1905-1908; An Institute of Chicago. HmkM'HJS: 
Siinii Inatitute, summer sessions, 1908, 1911. 1912; lljimlifrufi SHmol of 
Design and Normal Art, Minneapolis, 1910-1912; St out Institute, 1913- 

II. M. HANSEN 
Gabinel Making, Mill Work, Saw [Tiling 

I'lilll Irrn \ ,-ai -.' r\|irririi(T ill III ill H III k .mil a- put Irl'll milker, ell r|>e II I IT , 

ami clriif I -man : Si mi I Institute, 1912- 

F. F. I II I.LI X 
Machine Shop Practice, Foundry Work 
I*,, i,l ii.- University, 1904-1905; special student and inatruotor. Purdue 
University, 1905-1910. High I yearn' practical experience In the metal 
tradea. Inatruotor moohine whop praotioe. Rvansvllle, 1ml.. manual 
training school, 1910-1911; inatruotor foundrj praotioe, Chicago Uni- 
voraity, summer si'snhm. 1911; Stout Inatitute, l"t 1 1 — 

JOSEPHINE W. HOBBS 
Plain Sow inii. Junior and Advanced Cookery and Marketing 

Cook County, Illinois, Kormal School ■ 1897; Boston School «>f Domestic 
Scienoe, 1907. Teaoher in public schools, Dubuque, 1898-1908; super- 

\i-i>i il.im.--i i<- Hcioncc and matron M ■ Street Noighborh I House, 

Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1907-1908; superintendent "> . W, <". A. 
Training School for Household Service, Boston, 1908-1900; director 
Homemakors Sol I, Stout Inatitute, I909> 

ETHEL CHADDOCK IRWIN 

Junior Sewing, Dressmaking 
Stout Inatitute, 1911; Teachers College, Columbia University, It- s., 
bachelor's diploma in eduoat ion, 1913: graduate student, 1914: assistant 
inatruotor household arts, Bthical Culture School, New York City, 1914 : 
Stout Inatitute, l"l 1- 

K. F. JARVIS 
Blacksmithing, [nduatrial Economics 

Shop work, 1905; Universitj ■•!' Missouri, It. S.. 1912. Assistant En en- 
gineering shop work. University of Missouri, 1908; inatruotor manual 
training, Birmingham, Ala.. 1907-191 1; assistant In manual training, 
(Jniveraltj of Missouri, 1911-1912; Stout Institute, 1912- 

II. W. JIMERSON 
Plumbing and (i;i* Fitting 

Journeyman and contractor, 1KS1-1901; director Minneapolis School of 
Plumbing, 1904-1908; director plumbing trade school, Stout Institute, 
1908- 

NKLLE JOHNSON 
Household Management, Advanced Cookery 
Iowa State College, Ii. I... 1899; University of Minnesota, B. 8., 1910; 
High school principal, I8S9-1S99; instructor Centra] State Kormal, Kd- 
iii mill. Oklahoma, 1899-1908; instructor domestic science State Normal, 
Spcartiidi, South Dakota, 1910-191 1 ; supervisor home eoonomios, Racine, 
Wisconsin, 1912-1914; The Stout Institute, 1914- 

ALMA KRUEGER 

Physical Training 

Normal College, North American Gymnastic Union, Indianapolis, Ind., 
1911: director playground work Minneapolis, summers, 1912-1913; Stout 
Inatitute, \'<\ l- 

DAISV ALICE KUGEL 

Director of Home Economics Department] Organization 
hi' I lome Economics 

Universitj of Michigan, A. B., 1900; Columbia Univoralty, I?. 8. and «l i— 
ploma Teachers College, 1908; teaoher In public schools, 1902-1906; 
teacher of domestic science, Chautauqua, N. V. summer, 1911; Stoul 

Institute, l'.H«»- 




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Page Twenty 



ELIZABETH A. LATHROP 
Dressmaking, Primary Handwork 

Bo* ton School of Domeatic Science, 1905; Teacher* Colledoi Columbia 
University. 1010. Teacher of domeetlo art, Atlanta University, Atlanta, 
Georgia, 1005-1908; Stout Inatitute, 1910. 

MABEL II. I.KKDOM 

Chemistry 

City Normal School, Dayton. Ohio, 1804 1 Stout Institute, 1010s Columbia 
University, -it mi ■ ii,' r ses s ion, 1013, Teacher in public aehoola, Dayton, 
Ohio, 1805-1005 1 Stout Inatitute, 1910- 

MARY M. McCALMONT 

Chemistry 

w i-i in j n-ii-i Colledo, Now Wilmindton, Pa.i graduate student. Uni- 
versity of Omaha, Neb.. 1 - » 1 1 ; Univorsil > of Wisconsin, 1011-1912. Teach- 
er in public Mihoola, 1906- 1907; principal of hidh »»<- 1 ■<>. >i and supervisor 
of music, Woodville, Ohio, 1907-1909 1 city aehoola, Omaha, Nab., 1909- 
I'.il 1 1 Stout Inatitute, 1012. 

ELLA G. McCAULEY 
Millinery, Art Needlework 

Student Stout Inatitute, rammer aoeaion, 1911, regular eoaaion. HMl- 
l'.U'J. Ton yearn' experience as doaidnor micl trimmer ii> wholesale mil- 
liner) estabiiehmenta; inatruotor in millinery, Stout Inatitute. 1011- 

MAKY I. McFADDEN 
Psycholotfj 

State Normal Sol I, Oahkoah, 1897; University of Wiaoonain, Ph. B., 

1000; A. M.. 1007; University of Chioado, Ph. M., 1901 jTeaohere College, 

Columbin Univeraity. Januar) 1008-Ji 1008, Teacher, Grand Rapid* 

hidh school, 1801-1892; principal, Menominee Palla hidh school, 1892- 
1893: aaaiatant principal, Oconto hidh school, 1893-1895; nssoeiate su- 
pervisor of praotioe, Oahkoeh Normal School, 1901-1908 1 actinii assistant 
profeaaoi of education, Univentity of Kansas, one semester, I!mm,-1!Mi7: 
principal Muakodon City Normal School, 1909-1910; aunerviaor <>f prac- 
tice, teacher «»f pedadodl and muaio, Sauk County Training School, 
1011-1012; Stout Inatitute, 1912- 

O. C. MAI "II IK 

Physioal Training 

Normal School «>f North American Gymnastic Union, Milwaukee, 1895; 
Harvard Universit) aummer aohool of physical trainindi 1897; Chau- 
tauqua, N. if., aummer school, 1899; Gilbert Normal School of aaat hetioa 

and social danoind. Boat summer, 1904, Phyaical director. Turaver- 

• Iii Vorwaerta. Milwaukee, 1895-1898; West Minneapolis Turnverein, 
Minneapolis, 1895-1899; special Inatruotor, Harvard University, summer*. 
IN98- 1902. 1903; physioal director, Dayton Turndomeindo, and Young 
Womon's League. Dayton, '».. 1899-1903; phyaical director, Shreveporl 

Athletic Aaeociaa Shrevopprt, La., 1903-1909; supervisor of damee, 

Dayton vacation aehoola. l!Mi;{; supervisor of playdrounde, Shreveport, 
La., 1905-1000; phyaical director, Stout Inatitute, 1909. 

THOMAS R. MOVI.K 

( Shemistry 

Lawrenoa College, B. s.. 1899; M. A.. 1912; Chicago Univemity, 1909- 

1910. Teacher, Mauston, N\ i-.. Iiiiili aohool, 1800-1001; Sparta, Wia., 

i.ivi. aohool, 1001-1903; Appleton hidh aohool, 1005-1909; Mono; ii«- 

high aohool, 1910-191 1 : Stout Inatitute, 19U- 

MARY L. NII.KS 
Freehand Drawing and Design 

Chicado An Inatitute, 1902; student Minneuimli* llumlirmft (iuiUl, 
1908, and summer*. 1!h>7. 1908, VMf.t. 1910, 1911; student Prand aummer 
aohool, Chicado, 1912; private atudent under John II. Vandorpool and 
ciunli-- Krnm-ix Brown. l'.MU. Toucher of private art olaaaea, 1892-1909; 
teaoher of day mixlolind nnd pottery, Stout Inatitute, aummer aaaaionei 
1909-1913; Stout Inatitute, 1913- 

LOUIS F. OLSON 
Carpentry, General Drafting 

Stout Inatitute, 1908; graduate work Stout lo-tiun.-, hmit. Three yours' 
praotioal drafting, carpentry, ">><i contracting; teacher of forging and 
in. < hiri. ;il clriiwinu. Stout hiMtiiuto, 1907-1908; director of manual 
trainindi public aehoola, Madiaon. Wis., 1008-1!'11; ti-aclu-r of drafting 
and shop work, aummet aeaaiona, Banana State Manual Training No 
School, 1909; aummer aeaaiona. Stout Inatitute, 1907, 1910, 10H; Stout 
Inatitute, UH1- 



I'agc Twenty-One 



f 




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RUTH MARY PHILLIPS 

!•- 1 1 lil i — l t 

University of Wisconsin, 15. A.. 1904: graduate work, Universit} of Wis- 
consin, minimcr session. 1!»"">. and one aemmtori 1909. Teacher in hiiSh 
school. I..Hli. W'sioonsin. 1901-1905; teacher i» hirfh school. Blade River 
Palls, Wisconsin, 1906-1910: Stoul Inalilulc and Menomonic hidh school, 
1910- 

ROBERT II. RODGERS 

Supervision of Practice Teaching 1 and Methods of Teaching 

Manual Training 

Oregon Agricultural College, It. 8. in Mechanical Rntfincerinrf. 1909: 
Teachers Col lege, Columbia University. 15- B. and baohelor'a diploma in 
supervision "f Induatrial education, 1913: graduate study, Teachem 
College, 1913-1914: patternmaker, Portland. Oregon. IS9S-1905: innt rue- 
tor in ^ Iwork, turning and pattern makimi, Oregon Agricultural 

College, 1909-1912; instructor in meohanicnl drawing St. George liven- 
ing Trade School, Xe%» York City, 1912-1913: director ••; Home Thrift 
Association •hope, Sew York City, 1913-1914; Stout Inalitute, 1914- 

J. K. RAY 

Bricklaying, Cement Work 

Williamson Trade School, 1908; soven yearn' experience an journeyman 
bricklayer and foreman in various parts "i" » 1 « «- United Statow; Stoul 
Institute, 19] 1- 

KATIIERINE STANTON RUTLEDGE 

Junior Sewing, Dressmaking 

Qrinnell College, Iowa. 1910-1912; Columbia University, B. B. and bache- 
lor'* diploma in education. Teacher* College, li'l I; Stoul Inalitute, 191 I- 

RUTH VIRGINIA SIMPSON 
Junior ( !ookcry 

Illinois State Normal University. 1909-1910: eummer sessions, 1906, 1907, 
1906, 1909; Teaoher* College, Columbia University, 1911-1912. Teacher 
in public aohoola, LeRoy, Illinois, I90S, 1 90S; teacher of domeaticaeience, 
high school. LeRoy, Illinois, 1910-191 1 : high -. I.....I. Lead, South Dakota, 
1912-19131 stout Institute, 1913- 

J. o. STEENDAHL 
Mechanical Drav im: 

Stout Inalitute, 1905. Director manual training. La Junta, Colorado. 
1905-1906; The Academy of Idaho, Pooatello, Idaho, 1906-1910; head of 
drafting department, Portland School of Trades, Portland, On o 
1910-1912; Stout Inatitute, 1912- 

CLARA G. TURNER 
Household Management, Junior Cookery 

formal School, Predrfcton, N. B., l!">'-': Mi. Allison Ladloa' College, N. It.. 
1908; Teaohera Coilede, Columbia University, B. S., 1912. Teacher in 
public aohoola, New Brunswick, 1903-1904; teacher <-f domestic science, 
consolidated aohoola, Sow Brunswick, 1906-1911; Stout Inatitute, 1912- 

LOUISE WILLIAMS 

Mi«Tol)iol<>_\ 

MoGill University, 1907; B. A. and diploma bom NCoOill Sormal School. 
Columbia University, M. A. 1911, and maeter*e diploma in the teaching 
of biological science. Teachers College, 1911. Teacher of classics and 
science, Dunham College. Quebec 1907-1909: Stoul Inatitute, l*.»ll- 



!■.■•. 




Osii^zm oi Adinisii. 



W. P, IIII.I.IX 


GENEVIEVE I. FIELD 


BUHUIMI M;iii;iii«-r iiiul 


[{••iii-lr.ir. Appoint mi- ill 


I'u rahaaind Aden 1 


S.-cn-Uirv 


1015 


1013 


CAROLINE M. HELMKH 


ERBA II. NKSSKTH 


Preaiden 1 '■ Secretary 


Clark 


1912 


1010 


(CATHERINE II. II All N 


ZIl.lMIA BBNSEND 


< !hiel Librarian 


.\»~i»i;iii i Clark 


L008 


I'M 1 


CHR18TINE HAL8BTB 


(i. I.. BPB \<;i l 


A — intanf Librarian 


Extaxudon Work 


1012 


l!)ll 



Paee Twenty-Four 




Sesiloi Class Orffiesvs 



agxes McCarthy 

Prcwidon t 



MAURICE .1. KELSON 

Via -l'i >— i<l«'iii 



II \R«M i) o. GRIFFITH 



CLARENCE !•'. BELK 

-Ml .-I 







ADAMS. PRUSCILLA 
■I'i \my" 

80 K.-..I St. 

Si. Paul, Minn. 

>'. W. i 
A part of a lite wire." 



AITKKNS. BDITI1 

LeSuetu < '.'ii lei , 

Mi..... 



'Htr chemistry trouble} 
>: many." 



AMKUl'OIII.. DORIS 
"Do" 

II.-, Clark St. 

• Ii *1 ill"-. W'i-. 

Y. II . C. A. 
" The other pari oj the lire wire." 




ANDKUSON'. ABUAIIAM A. 
••Miii Andj '• 

139 S. Curry Si. 

Iron wood i Midi. 

Football U) 

•There are 32.1 girls here. Ttt been 

OHJ With 830. I he other fite art 

married." 



ANDKUSON. ANDREW 
"Little Andy" 

Ban Claire, 
Wie. 

Football (2) 

"At home with the bunch." 



ANDKUSON. RUTH M. 
"Andy" 

189 Eighth St. 
Calumet, Mloh. 

Philo (I and 2) 

"U'ky have a fake announcement f" 



Twenty-Eight 





0% 



4 





ARPKE, ELLA 

•Kiln" 



AUGUSTINE, LAURIXE 
"Pat" 

Iti-rlin. < >nl .. ( "iii\. 



Sheboj lin it . Win. 

Philo (I) 
'Tkt dost ehemhlry shark." Ilrr pastime, baseball and toting." 



BAILEY, PARKS 
"Parks*' 

7.1 N. BntavJa 

Itiiliivin, III. 
Football (/) (apt. (J) 
Baseball (/) 
A modes! woman nertr I 
hers*. 






BAKER, DtMA 
"Tubby" 

303 B. AIti .....i. . 
Pomona, Cal, 

V. W. i 
"Q»i*t.' Von should know her belter" 



BARKER, BERNICE 
"Imp" 

12] WOmoa \%. . 
Monomonic, w Em 

\tkUtk Board (J) 
Annual Pit 

•<-• Here- 



BARTLETT, SADIE 
"Bnrtfo" 



( liiimlii-rliiin. S. I ). 



iuelry." 




BAS8FORO, M. HANNAH 


BATTY, MBDA R. 


BBLK, CLARENCE l-\ 


"M. Hannah" 


"Mod*" 


"Balk" 


111 [rfleharl Ave. 


745 Stihmn, si. 


BolMi Idaho 


Si. Paul, Minn. 


Maaon ( it > . l"« •> 


Football tbollU) 

Q 
Annua! B "as. U'» 


"Enrybody'i fritnd." 


"A HtW sparkler- M Mi n 1 


:..'« art all right, but I :vanl 
a home." 






BELL, BERNICK 
"Tinkle" 
Blooming P 

M inn. 

PkiloW Hiturt 

Annual I' lay (/) 
'Interfiling, but she ha< tihfr inltr- 



BENNETT, FLOl B. 

320 Saj mill Si. 
M.ii.i-Ii.i. \\ i-., 

Y.WA 

■ 



BERG, ARTHUR E. 
"Bad*" 

025 l'.ih Ave. 
Axhliiiicl. Wim, 

ttrs (/) 









BIDDICK, LBO. K. 
"Biddy" 

Montfort, w i- 



HOIIST. ROBERT l 
"Bob" 
111'* ill. Si. s. B. 

M iini<'ii|M>li>. Minn. 



BRAINARD, ELLEN 
"Becky" 

Ijhic Hix-k. \\ in. 



"Quiet. i<ut <>( high ideals.'" 



"lit knev a lit!:. mint "To know her fj l„ kn-e.i a food 

here." lime." 






\ 1 






HUASIK. M. MURIEL 
"BraMie" 



BREAKEY, ETHEL 
"Ethel" 



BREAKEY, RUTH 
"Shorty" 



Mm ■ ('.filter. Wis. 



Montioallo, Minn. Aim. i C.iil.r. \M«. 

Plait 

1 • " ' ' There NM I ,1a not 

and know, but I don't >'.•••>■ "Wktnlakn hakan." 

ure." 



P..K.- Tl.irl\-Oll 




BROWN, ESTHER 
"Shorty" 



BRIKKMANN, WALTER N. 
••Brink" 

1008 Ninth si. 

M.-1I..II1..II I.'. Win. 

CUtCUU 

my falktr It a minister, but "Bt 
r pal." 



Iliirllaiul. Wis. 

v. w. (i 



BRYAN, ELIZABETH 
"Beth" 

733 U. 111. Si. 

It.-.l Wind, Minn. 



IIY wonder h-m- *hf fUt ulont ieilh- 
out lilhrl." 






BULLOCK, AGNES 
"Miss" 

861 Bishop AvOi 
Milwaukee, Win. 



CALLAWAY. MAYMK 
"Mary" 

!■'..« lar, Iml. 



CARLSON, CLARENCE 
"Noisy" 

.v.'.". W. 8th St. 
Superior, Wis. 



"Autocrat •■• Ik* breakfast table." "Mill loyal /<> PurJut." 



'A quirt fellow, Iho a t°od fellour." 



Page Thirty- Two 



in. i 





1 cf. 

J 



CAVES, MYRTLE 


(II WIUKKI.AIN. PEARL 


••M. 


"Tappj " 


Black River Pall*, 




Uis. 


Hutohinaon, Minn 




' 


" 1 milr. .1 hike, a hushel "f fUH." 


"When dots Hamlint play Sloutl ' 





CIIKSLEY. HAZEL 
"Ralph" 

( Sampbcllapoi I ■ lVla. 

1 1H i g) 

'■■< hammotkr' 



CHICKERIN'G, Kl III It. 
"Chick" 

<w»s Ninth St. 
Menomonia, \\'i~. 



f 




H 



< ll \sk. EDITH 
"Ede" 
ic.i; w . 26th St. 
M inneapolin, Minn. 

Homtmaktr, i 

'She max truth later." 




CHRIST. (CATHERINE 
"Kath" 

w auaaukca, w i«. 



'Simph and demure." 



Three 



~l 






CHRI8TBNSEK, CARL 


CLIFFORD, M tftGCBRlTB 


COMSTOt K, KRN'KST 


■•( 'In i^l i.'"' 


"Cliff" 


••( ..III Ml \ 




J»l Mamhall A»e. 


2101 >il« Si 


Portland, Me. 


St. Paul, Minn. 


Menomonie, \\ i~ 




• 




ilism." 


"Wtopon A I-:? OH th. 


"Wktn K ■'•-■■ firtsulr. tiur 







COMSTOCK, W VLLACK 
"Thai oldasl Cometock" 
2104 hi. St. 

M . ■ i ■ . > 1 1 1 • • i < ■ . - . W i- 

SmJeni Council 



CONM \1 . MAUR1XE M. 

•■( .■iiiii.-" 

1903 Mount » bit* Ave. 
MinneapoUa, Minn. 

•i\ vkat she thinks." 



CRARY, GEORGIA 
"Little Runt" 

Rentier, N. I>«k. 



■ 



r .• i 




CUMMINGS, 
M. MARGUERITE 

"Pctfaj "' 

1 1 Summit Court 
Si. Paul, Minn. 

'She is from the west, bu: has a 

litisl-miiiH arrrni.' 



DAANB, JEANNE 

'•.liiliniii.-* - 

1412 N. rth Si. 

SIh-Im.v u.iii. \\ i-. 

Pkilo ii) 



hmnie." 



DAWSON. JOHN 
"Sl«*py" 

Pontiao, Mioh. 

C 

'/ hate read •nrwhere. 

tit." 




4 

\ 



m 




DKMI'SKI . MARY 


DENHAM, JANE 


DICK, GLADYS 


"Danpi" 


"JENNIE" 


"Dickfo" 


158 l'.ili Si. 






M ilw iink.M-. \\'i~. 


1 to« 1 -vill.-. \\ i». 


Braddoek, X. Dak. 




/'Aito (*) 


Pkilo (*) 


Class Vict r 


Plrw. J'. W. 1 


" Independence her middle name." 


if you would use eommon 
sense, saytih Jant." 


"Hail, tood fellow well met." 




DRESCHER. GEORGE 



Sun Prairie, Wia. 



DROWN, RUTH I.. 
"Ruthin" 

Nordhoff, Cal. 



1 don't knov out from th* "I'm a Junior. I'm hrrt by mis- 
otktr." lake." 



IHNKI.K. ESTHER 
"Dunkie" 

(iilllKIII. lOH'l 
Phlh (/» 

• Tim: tasty DunkU Kid 









DURBAHN*. WALTER E. 

••< '■■■in i " 

NVw I'lin. Minn. 

' ikere it only one iiri 
Men monit." 



BDMISTON, HARRIET \ 
"lljirrirln Pick I*" 

701 Baal Ith St. 
Santa Anna, Cal. 



BII.KRT, \l.\ IN 
"Si iffy" 

1215 ?tll St. 

Mi-nomoiiii-. \\"in. 

Hikers (#) OrekeUra (I ani 
ngtrt ahoul 'Mum kalh cMarnu, an 








KILKRT, CLARA 
"U. of C" 

1211! 7ili St. 
Manomonic, Wi-. 

J . II'. < i 

;.-;> art my ■ mpom- 




KI.KK. WILLIAM 
"Bill" 

Chaaka. Minn. 

• tri i .') 
Hika 
' WkooP'G-la-la'Jaja." 



f 



Z: 



FAVOUR. FLORENCE 
"Floaaie" 

1080 Oak Si. 
Baloit, Wla. 

l'h,i 
v ir. r. i. (/) 

kt »fiM make Kin iy for 
ttadisont" 






FII.KINS. CLARA 


FITZGERALD, LORETTA 


FRENCH, CLAUDE B. 


"Polly" 


"Laurie" 

!MI K. 2nd Si. 


"Claud Ium" 


Elgin, Minn. 


Fon <i" Laoi W In. 


Kant, Wii-ii. 






Football (l and 9) Basketball (f) 




Orchestra (1 a>. Prtt. (/) 


"/ vrontti like '■> 00 thru 


"(let L*i." ' family 


"Did he ever lore mure than one! 


summer 


anl hear her rare." 


Ho doubt he vol always true." 



irty -Seven i 







OEISLER, BLEAXOR 
•' M I-- < Seialcr" 

2112 Jackson St. 
Dubuque, Iowa 



• Tke skater* or tht m 



GUESSBN'IIAINBR, I. II. All 
*•( iu\ " 

1817 N". r t it St. 
Sheboygan. \\ i«. 



frank an i true. 
You carry happiness vili: 



GIFFORD, METTA 
"Mutt" 

Bdgarton, to i- 

y. ii. < . i 

Phi: 
"Incomplete vitkou: 




GILBERT, J. EDWARD 
"Doc STak" 

Emporia, Kaa. 

AIM* 

'Tallinn is only our of my ac- 
complishments." {Bytkti 

nd and helper to all ke 
I By Ike /i. 



GOLDBORG, \. .1. 
"Pinkay" 

llopkin-. Minn. 
Footba! 

< !hI> (O 
■' is anything I don't know. 
it is because I didn : kau .'."if 
to learn it." 



C.OKBV, ALVA 

•■ M ;■•■. < Sorby" 

[ndlanapolia, Ind. 



'She belir.es in betterint the vorld 
by Ike melkod of subtraction." 



Pane Thirty-Eight 




GOSSKTT, II. W. 

"Bill" 

Daiiv III--. Ind. 
te, 

. • mm 
"Say ft 

■taut" 



GRAHAM, SADIE M. 
"Cookiwi" 

Burlington, Iowa 



'I'm lirtd ■■• hrmg tolled 

••: trl." 



QRIER. RUTH 

•Until" 

Lake < lenci a, I* i». 
mart like htr." 




GRIFFITH, HAROLD 



GROEN'DYCKE, BELLE 
"Ixaj " 

M.il i.iiu- I.oilu'-. 
Kan. 



Bvanarilla, \\ |«. 

Hiktn (/) 

Clan Set. (!) 
"Iltllo. Anybody teant to to to the "I am not plum?, I'm fat." 
dame teitk met" 



GROSSTUCK, FRED W„ Jr. 

"Fr.-.l" 

;;> w iimoi St. 
Portland, Ma. 

■ en (/ and g) 

Student Council (/ and i) 
"School days are long for some." 



Pane Thii 




BAEFKER, RUTH 
"Rufua" 

808 Cliati ■• St. 

('luirl.-- City. I"« a 



"llrr tmtiU and friend art tin- 




HAIIS', ALLEN 
"Dutch" 
Monomania. \\ i«. 
Paskelball il 
Football (I an 
ill (I) 
"Surf. I knru hrr; I lautkt in hfr 
em." 






BALL, AKKE M. 

■ ■ \ ii ii.-"" 

Fairmont, Minn. 

Hiker* (3) 

"H> kKS- rich othn 
d'tn'1 nttd a eh . 




IIALVBRSON. IIASSEL 
"Hazel" 
North wood. N. Dak. 
For.iball <,') Hiker* (1) 

I (l) 

itr.hr ■■ 
'W'ktn 

other Iking* gfo 



BARKIS. RACHEL I.. 
"Raoh" 

Plandreau, S. Dak 
V. W.C. I I 
"Week rnds art but;. 



HEALEY, ETTA 11. 
"Etta B. M 

Roeheatar, Minn. 
V. W.C. 1. t 

"Skf doti hrr OVR Ikimki 



Forty 




IIKINKN. AGNES 
"A" 

Hastings, Minn. 

Y. W. ( i. 

'I'm no fkcrk. 
the fob." 



HODGE. ETHEL 
"Ethel" 

Ban Clair*, \n .-. 

■ 

:h do ye m>tkt the 



HOLMES, JENNIE I.. 
"Jennie Lou" 

234 Short Si. 
Seenah, Wis. 

V. U . t 

more is to 
more." 




HOPKINS, BESSIE 
"Bom" 

Moom Jaw, Sii«.k.. 
Can. 



I'm notlifint. I'm merely tasting." 



limn <>N. MABEL M. 
"Hords" 

Fenlmore, nn >-. 

Y. W. C A.U an. 

'Farorite stunt — To be vtigl 

receipt of a <Ke <jnd 



HOUSEHOLDER, HAZEL 
"Tiny" 

Webster, N. V. 

■ 
"I'm 01 bit for me - 




HOW \ui), imiuothv 
"Dott" 

Hitfhwood 
St. Paul, Minn. 

'What's the use of studying b*t* '/ 
there are none.''' 



HOWB, ii \/.i:i. 
"Bust) "' 

1". N. Roof St. 
Aurora, III. 



.1 member -./ the SHA RK family.' 



HOWES, (CATHERINE 
"Dutehy" 



Tomah, Wia, 



A German. Yt$l and he's all 




QUGELBN, REINHART 
"Hooligan" 

HH Hnn.rofl Av... W. 
F.riju- Fall* Minn. 

- 

( tub 
"Say fellows, ichy don't the Hikers 



0% 



# 



£ 



HULL, ISABEL 
"laaj " 

Priacilla bin 

l>.-lr«.it. Midi. 




HissKV. ANNA 



"Ask I sty. she knovs." 



Lathrop, Mo. 



"And y<t. I vould like to ask." 



Page Forty-Two 




HYDE, CHARLES W. 
"Charlio" 

Ills X. I*-,!, si. Boiaa, Idaho 

Editt* l>. 
Treat. 11 

■ 
"Annual. \there did I hear that 

■ 



i VCK, KTHEL 
"Jack" 



Wauooma, [o* .• 



"Detertr.- and tail 

word far me." 



JA< KSON, HIRAM 
"Hikay" 

.MM lllil, Si. 
Manomonia, \\'i-«. 

"lie's In '■ a fev. 

and still luokinz around." 





• i IMES. ELTA 
"Baania" 

226 N- Snallind 

St. Paul, Minn. 



JEKKEKY. BKKTIIA M. 
M.ff 



JENSEN, KITTY 
"Kit" 



Monro*-. 1%'ia. 



1'hilo (.') 

"Future kopa -.1 dale with Camp." 'Mulls other half." 



loin. H'fi 



TA*- tared Maar* again* 



i orty-Three 





JESTER, GEORGE \. 
••("n-ortSio" 

Central School 
Boi»e. Idaho 



JONES, MVHA 

"Jonotj 



Koou Grore, buL 
», . Hik, ■ 

Phil 
t •ind yet Mn taint." 

:m." 






JOnNSON, < >i ( . \ 
"Olrfa" 

BSD N. Brown st. 
Rhinclandcr. Win. 



A dilitfi! Undent n4 without re- 
mit." 






KANGAS, l.l (l\s 
"Tubby" 

813 N. 3rd st. 
bihpomintf, Vfieh. 


KAVANAUGB, GERALD 


KAVAXAUGH, M. .1. 
"Martin" 

l)i>\s niiiii. \N'i-. 




mai* me mitt ■->«<• nitht 
knrtk uith < 1 


itraM." 


"Snuff n for debute." 




Paee Forty- Four 




■■BHaaBHHHBBmilHMBaBniB^MBBBHH 










KNAPP, LILLIAN 
"LUI" 

i.oni: Prairie, Minn. 



HELTON, ROBERT 
"Bob" 
'.'.'{'•> Chippewa Si. 
Ban Claire, \\ i*. 

;// (I) 
Bcskdball </> 

\ / -/. •.* Ilob. That kid UiM "Wt h>[>e she tmpTOftt in her 1 smile U the \amr in all Ion- 

ian flay basketball." metfaxh «< making (offer." **<;. 



KLUG. BTHBL I.. 
"Ethel" 

Lake Geneva, Win, 

I'hilo (#) 




KNOWLBS, (CATHERINE H. 
"Kitty" 

T.">^ Lincoln Ave, 
Si. Paul, Minn. 

I'hilo il and t) 

■ ! <>/ fun unlfr a qmitt or- 

ItTUW." 



KNUTSON, BRNEST W , 
"Knute" 



KOBHLBR, STANLEY L. 
"Unola Joah" 

New I'lin, Minn. 



Kly. Minn. 
HUurt >i> Prtt. nUuri 
Band U) OrchtttraU) 

lli U ■:• r;r . to : -i ■:■ ;, .• ,' ;.;. 

things about him.'' 



Pace Foriy-Fivt 










■ < r a 



KOOKS. ERNEST N. 
"Koonte" 

Temple, Okla. 

GUt(, . 

"/ never hot* muck i<- toy, hut I </<> 
thinking." 



KRBIPKB, CHARLOTTE 

••1...1 ii." 

KKil I'.m.ll A.r. 
K\ BIW ill''. Iml. 



"lltr keart and krr ttatur* <ire i,< 
tquol size." 



LANGE, GERTRUDE 
"Gertie" 

L'ls 1: 
< )w :il. .mm. Minn. 

J . II. < I 

"Why tkose trips t<> Ktn Clair*t 

>i-A krr kome," 






i.kiini:. NORA s. 


LeMASTER, DAISY ». 


LIGHTENBERG, EDNA 


"Niirn" 


"Mi-- 1.. Mii-ti-r" 

l.'( Monongalia St. 


"l.iilil ii-" 


Dmi Park, Wis. 


( ll.ll I<--|0WII, W. \'n. 


Prinoeton, Vt '<-■ 


l. ir. < 






"Thru tin iht world stems 


"Hut, Mist ktePaddt*, Don't you 


■ectly knew you vert ktrt." 


ttriptd blue and trhiti." 


Ikink tkat—t" 





Paxc I 








L1DDY, MARTIN L. 
"Mart" 



LIKIIOFF, BMILY 

"l.imly " 



M«- nonie, Win. 

Band (i) 
GUt ( . 

'"'"• // / can't hart mint I want "Wt with ktr room mate would 

'squeal." 



Shakop**, Minn. 
I'hilo (I and .') 



LITTLE, ORLANDO II. 
"Little Boj 

LaSueor, Minn. 

Gareleers (/ an 
Orektstrc 

Ah thu anything 

about him he'll blush." 




LOCKHART, GRACE 
■•( irac !• 

PSam, s. Dak. 



LUCAS, KATHRYN V. 
"Kate" 

I ► 1 1 1 .iii.i. Win. 



"Goorf at gieing hitchtn thou-ers." "She earritl <.?.;. U'l personality.' 



LITNDER, HERBERT 
"Horbfo" 

Rector, Minn. 
alee Club (-') 
Student Manager I ■••oiball (g) 

'IWi a mighty good little kid." 
(M. II '.) 



Page 1-orly-S.v.ii 




LYMAN, MILDRED 
"Millie" 

VAf.t I2th Vrm. 
Mi n i h ■ . 1 1 »« • I i - . M i ii 11 - 

I'hll: \ 

'M'kfTf tktrt is kaney, :h<r. 



MARTIN', MARY 
"Merrj Sunahine" 

loi Broadway 
M ii-, hi ine. Iowii 



•/ uu Ktxall Hah 



MARTIN. RAMONA 
••Monic" 

182 W. 8th St. 

Mi. -iiiuiiii City. Ind. 

V. II. C.A, 




M VTIIIAS, EIKLRN L. 
••Helen" 

155 Parwetl At*. 
M il« nukee. \\ i». 



MATIIY, EUGENE J. 
"Jean" 

Bruaatela, W i-. 



MAYNARD, \ INA 
"Skinnj " 

I... Mi- Prairie. Minn. 



"H> Ikol her quitl, but >he (hums 
Irnu K 



•'.1 r». " 1 ii ihtt 



'-' 





McCOLLOW, MARY 

"Miiry" 



McCORKINDALE, JESSIE 



McCarthy, agnes 

"Bcnnj " 
S26 Graanwood Bird. 

Bran* ton. III. Uartford, Wb. Odabolt, I « • ^- - ■ 

\HMuat 
Phti 
■■True : her work, far *4U aflgrnooH, end '/ wondtr why Ihty coil me .!/<• 

n>4aie." loir." 




McCULLOCH, ANNIE 
'< < 1 1 1 > Ann" 

( Iharokaa, l"« ■> 
Philo (i) 

I .r Falls r" 



McDonald, ben 

"Smilm" 



Mcdonough, tbrbba 

"Tim -m" 



Edtfarton, Wia. 

Philo U and J) 



Monomonie, w i-. 

n BasktlbaUU) 
ienl Council (/) 

•Tke harder you hit him. the bigger < an /»'«."" 

Ike smile." 



A 






MoKEE, QRACK 
••Mao" 



MoMASTER, JANNETTE 

"M«« " 



Alma, Sab. Molina, 111. 

Uika 

Worked hard an i played hard; ha! "1 hart my own opinions ani air 
a good lime." their. 



McQueen, sue 

"Sula" 

Superior, Vim. 

1 and f) 




MEANY, LORETTA 
"Lorria" 

\.\% London, Wia. 



MICHAEL, WINIFRED 

"Mike" 

Gattaburtf, B. Dal 



"Auto rides are all .right . but — " "Wt vish she would talk mart " 



MILLER, ALMA 
"Millar" 

393 Farmer St. 
Monroa, ^^ ■ ~. 

Pkilo (/) 

"She's strong for alMetits." 




MORRIS, MARGERY 
"Martf" 

I paM ii'll, S. link. 
V. II . < 



N'EILL. BKSSIE 
■■ Poodles" 
HO Sid Ave. s. w . 
Aberdeen, s. Dak. 



KELSON*. ESTHER M. 
"Esther" 
211 N. Division St. 
Waupaca, \\i». 



"It thtr, | hart to \tnd that's true. 

her. Skei m ■ I'm on 






SKI _s<)N. BARVEY T. 

"Tl, -..•■ 

DerUa Lake, N. Dak 
Butim • Annual (.£> 

(/) Pres. lij-.elters (/) 

I 

Club (#) 
"A rather stout student. " 



VKI.S'iN. MABEL 
"Mabel" 



Waupaca, Wis, 



N'ELSOX, MATILDA 
"Mitch" 

2225 W. III. Si. 
Duluth, Minn. 



SmiUt.smiUs, far milts and milts. 



I'.u. i- 




NKI.SON. RUTH 
••TimiSt." 



Racine, Wim. 



NELSON, MAURICE J. 
"Moitm" 

1003 S. Kn.ni Si. 
\ ! i i i i k : i i . . . M inn. 

Student Council '/> Chairman '.'> 
Vice Pre*. GarHeen 1/ and -'> 

• •■ " "Quiet. bulttryegetU* 
" An all aroun no." 



Msskn. MARY .1. 
"Mitry" 

« .1 .111.1 Mood oh . M inn 



"She halh her 'hare ..I wisdom." 






N'IMMii, MARION O'MEARA. BERNADETTE 
••l.ii ill- Nemo" "Stubbj " 

208 Ninth Ave. 3338 RomboUl Ave. 

Mcnomonit, Wie. Minneapolis, Minn. 

» . II < 1 



<>|{ \. PRANCES 
"Fan" 



MillKIU il. \\ 1- 



"A ut<mati> , hrr "A luilr mischiej n ki- an! then it " Interested in church work." 

hair." relished by the best of men." 



Page I uty-Tw, 




*fu 






(IKK. FLORA G. 
••( Sec" 

Mount Hop-. \\'i». 

PkihV) 

i 



OSTRANDBR, JAN'IE 

".linii«-" 

Spring Vail*} . Minn. 



OTTESON, HK1.KN" 
"Fluff" 



Viroqua. \\ i». 



"Skthat m 
>:t vilk h'r K<tmr." 






PARKS. GLADYS 
"Gladys*' 



Snlielii. Colo. 



PAGE, RALPH 

•I'iiij. •'• 

Miinkiilo. Minn. 

Footb.; 

StuJtnt liauagtr Batkeibalt (i) 
Ats'l Business Manager Annual (2) 

"Al k< ■■ ■'■■-■ 

StoH'f.i Iff b\ th- 



PASCOE, MIRIAM 
"Miriam" 

9 3rd St. 
Caluraat, Mioh. 

ter what happens, skt 



Pasc Fifty-Three 




PETERSON, JUDITH 

"Judy" 

l'riiM'«-ton. 111. 
Philo (/) 
U A . bullhtn tfi •FuUtr: " 



PICHA, LAWRENCE <:. 
"Fiuaer" 

Ka-nyon. Minn. 



PIRSCH, MARGARET. V. 
"Margaret" 

S19 Enhi in..- St. 

K.ni.-Ii.i. \\ i». 



try. I'll vay" 

skate all ortr yon." 





POLNIETEER. JENNIE 
"Jen*' 

696 Marion St. 

Wmikcuiin. III. 



'Ilafinr imugidcni knoicUdte, tie." 



POOL, ESTHER B. 
"Esther" 

2626 Fox A.v. 

Ft. W'iiyn.-. Iml. 

V. W. < 

"Lift — tvo lalkalh 

tomtont lo slam, atui a pair of 
rubbtri." 



|HM)I.. KITH K. 
"Poolj Lalca" 

Redftold, s. Dak. 
Philo (/) 
Ut$l aim —To bt a Dmek 

tin." 



Page Fifty-Four 




POST, ROBERT M. 
"Bobbie" 



PRINCE, EVELYN 
<>ur Girl" 



Kv.l.th. Minn. 



RAUTIO, JOHN N. 
"Rusher" 



Kly, Minn. 

km (1) 



Barron, Wis* 

Band (I) 
Orchestra (J) Glee Club (*) 

"She should never have Uxkad a: me "Who is going out vilh our [irl to- "A men never knau-s what he can do 
if she meant I shouldn't love her.' nis until he :>. 






lf% 



RENDELL, DOROTHY 
"Dodfe" 

2725 Brj ant Ave, 
Minneapolis, Minn. 

Fhilo (£) 
I here is loo much talking" 



RICE, IRMA 
"Irmie" 

708 8. Ilth St. 

St. Joseph, M". 

Philo (*) 

"F «• are so dtttr as to *«. 
miuhief they do." 



RICK, RUTH 
"Pouty" 

Mi-Ill...!. \\ i». 

'What is yours is part mine, and 
tchal is mine is my otcn.' 



Pane Fill 




IS 





RICHMOND. D'BTTA 

•D.i" 

Plainvfow, Minn. 



RIPPE, ALICE 
"Alios" 

Madiaon, 8. DnU. 




DMT iini see «i when ve gel "The Madison fellovs /ii 
seUU So d. 



RITTBR, JOHN M. 

•".I.'ilin '" 

Oln.y. 111. 
Care!. . 

Come :<i ftUows; St* ken 

it at Brad!. 



A 



rm 
ai 





ROBB, HELEN 
"Lena" 



Winona. Minn. 



ROGGB, GLADYS 

•|'.«li.v" 

I'.i; i 
( >-likf>~li. Wim. 



ROWLEY, ARMENA 

■"M innie" 

1616 2nd Ave. N. 
Kort Dodde, Iowa 



Philo (*) 

"Skt may bt F.n.. name. 

•If Mark Txrain xatn't. I irould "The embodiment of perpetual but ker wit Would do 

bt." mot; any /.-. 



Pasc I- 






RUTI.EDGB. ANNE 
"Ann" 

Kimiia-loliiiru. Iowa 



■ 



SANDS. BESSIK 
"B«m" 



SANDVIG, EDWIN M. 
"Bd" 



Lad) -mil li, \\'i«. 



Spring Vall*j , W i- 

i . '.'■ . 

ntr hap- -a fair la ly." 

nappy." 





O 




SCHAEFER. .MAIN <:. 
-Al" 

Ely, Minn. 

Animal K«r: 
Ortkt 

Viifl'r. I audi) 

II 

I Uarn to lor< 
that tirl." 



SCHALLER, JOSEPHINE 

Elatftingtf, Minn. 



SCHADE, OLIVER 
"Sohado" 

II..in-y Croek, \v'i>«. 



".Vol slront <•> mt Ihmk'. 
"I want a ftn&r in tnrythln$, if On mixint Ml ir;nks. 

only my Unit ont." Bui. Lord, ho* ht mists his fussint." 



>• -Seven 




SGHAPER, RITH 
"Ruiue" 



Plymouth, Wis. 



SCHBELD, ALICE 

••Hilly-' 

Spring V«ll»y, Minn. 



.;. nothing, tor "As ye see. Jo shall ye rip." 
Ihry shall nerer be ijn 



sc.lllMMKI., PRANK R. 
"Sohim" 

Ttaoh Mill*. Wfa. 

BosktibaU (I) 

"Sometimes I ut and think and some* 
times I jus! 




SCHUCHTER, MARGARET BCHULZE, ELIZABETH 

"Sehliot" "SohuItsiA" 

808 N. III. St. L880 R, 88th si. 

Burlington, l»wn Cleveland, Ohio 

Annual />' 

V II . ( . A. (*) 
"One icho ha* a heart joyful to do "Ski is latl and groumt taller." 
all that i 



shanks. GERTRUDE 
"Mm. Shanka" 

Poreef <ii>. Mo. 



I . 117/ 1 he has a Where- 
fort." 



Page Pifty-Bight 






SHAW, KI.I.A M. 

"l'-luiw" 
l.iiwrfiic'f luirjl, Intl. 



i Yank**." 



SHUGART, GRACE M. 

"Su ijar" 

Prlnoston, ill. 
Philo (I andS) 



SIKVKUS. THOMAS <i. 
"Tom" 

Got Iifiihurii. N«-l». 
Basketball U 



<:t ma btcame Uarntd by "Hose's tht wtalhtr up tkrr< 
looking Witt." 




SIMB, MAU.KIUIK 
"Sintie" 

1807 Carrol Am-. 
St. Paul, Minn. 

Hikts 

'.by many friend- 
skips.' 



SKI I.I.MAN. BTTA 
"Ettto" 

606 B. 6th St. 
Korthffold, Minn. 

V. W.C. A. (I) 

'What's in a namtt" 



SKINNER, VERA 
"Pinkey" 



Tomah, \\ i-.. 



1 Why shouldn't I tikf 



P*tc Kitty-Nine 




<% 





SKOGSMARK, GERHARD 
"Skofttie" 

Itryjin, Minn. 
Rika 

I and 2) 

'A *•*>! .at K'jud 



SMITH. MILDRED (1. 

"SniiH -!•> " 

Si. Cloud, Minn. 

I. II. ( i 
I'hilo (S) 
'A laugh it uwrfA a hundred (roans 
i« any marktt." 



80DKRLIND, GRACE 
"Sodia" 

Lake Ben ton, M inn. 



.1 ttnitu -<>n< who wot hmt 




STACK, MARGARET 
"Staokie" 

7<mi Ottawa Ave. 

St. Paul, Minn. 



'Fltad with St. Pfler for me. for 
I ItHote III be late." 



STALEY, KATHERIN'E 
"Miai K. S." 

St. Paul, Minn. 



"// you tcould hare things come 
your teay. go after them." 



STEBKDAIIL, BERENICE 
"Chubby" 

1017 Wllaon Are. 
Menomonio, Wim. 

I'hilo (I) 

'I'll hate plaits in my dress, dinner 

platei. pie plain, elt." 



Page Sixty 




STUBRWALD, GILBBB l 
"GiU" 

780 27th St. 
Milwaukee, \\ i~. 

II 

'.hat doth ltd brii ki- 

th* Rt-n.r Ik kit talk." tkty osuhi 



BTBN'ERSON, ARTHUR 


SIKH!. INC.. I'UIO 


"Duty" 


"Phio" 


1006 Wilson Aw. 




Mcllnllloilli', \\ ',-,. 


Oahkoah, tt i-. 










BTUTZMAN, LEONA G. 

"Junie" 

Britton, s. Djik. 
I'kii 

V. II. < I 
niktri 

'Has ske oul-tjcncn htr nltk- 
name!'' 



BUNDQLIST, [DELLA 
"WyU" 

M.inio-ii. C<il... 



SWAKSOX, ETHEL 
"Plunk*} '" 

Stambaudh, Slioh. 



"/ ka:r <-. / say a Iking I ■■ 

aw*." 



ity-One 




SWAN'SON*, LEAH 
"Swannta" 

802 Baal Itfa St. 

M.j.i.n ( 'ily, limn 

. uld hate 
been an actress." 



TEELE, MARGARET 
"Fa^ty" 

Rwl Wintf, Minn. 



" If it's a man. tell him I'm not htrt." 



TIIONE^ . GORDON J. 
"M utt«r Thonajr" 

I~li i>«-m i n ii. Mioh. 

Pooibell I 

had IiltU eompttiti 





THK1KKK1.DT. BRNA M. 
•Topaj " 

(Ml Mineral St. 
Milwauk**, Wim, 

Pkilo (4J V. II'. C. A. <-') 
for home. 
Where >r. ■■im is nothing 

but foam." 



TIEMANN. II. \. 

••Tii-iiiiiii" 

1629 Wash. t\v: 
Bvantiville, Iml. 






TOMLINSOK, MKKNA 
"Tommy" 

Ir.ni Rivai . W i~. 
'Why do tmile at mtf" 



Page Sixty-Two 






TOM l.K. BERENICE II. 
"Bobbie" 

1050 Haduc Ave. 
St. Paul, Minn. 

»'. W.C. I. • 



TREBILCOCK, JAMES 
"Jim" 

Prineeton, Mich. 

FootbcU (I and t) 



I zein of mir."^ bene.y.k ker air . ;te m«- wu..'." 

of dignity " 



TREZONA, MARTHA 
"Mart" 

Kly. Minn. 



Tktrt it nothing that hot ker s me." 




* 



t? 



tf 




TREVITHICK. ETHEL 
"Teed 

Platte, S Dak. 



TURNER, MAY C. 
"May" 

•ton, Minn. 



VALASKB, HERMAN, JR. 

•Vnl" 

mi loth St. 

Menomonie, \\ i». 



tky ckeeks with "I didn't look tikr this vhen I came "Hi attends strictly to his own 
blmhf here." basin 




L'LRBY, OLIVE 

■•( VI.M \ " 

North Miinflu—i.T. Iiul. 



[,'NGER, MARION 

"Marion" 



.\\i«'ii. Iowa 



WALLBRIUS. JULIA B. 
"Judj " 

II..-: In-.-- Minn. 



•The -v platt, "( hrhtm.x u.i< a'utkydayfvr me." 

Chalanoota exetpu 



Smiles. 




WAKDSCHKBIDER, PAULINE 

"Polly" 

1«> B. Mil. Av. 
Ft. Atkinson, \\'i-. 



WEBB, ZBLLA 
"Roddy" 



Silili-y. Iowa 



WEDGE, RUTH A. 
"Ruth" 

308 B. I ili Si. 

/.uinlirolii. Minn. 

Phttc W Y.W.C.A. {$> 

•Hell Immctt in connection u-ith "A merry heart makelh a cheerful "Si •■> in the path oj the 

whatriporl ams tit ma n a." ambitious." 



tty.Pour 



mi iiiiii 'ii 




WEIGLER, MARTHA 
"Wifttloa" 

108 Flral St. 

Mt'iiiiohii. Wl*. 



I RcnuitH stfkrr aitrr kn 



WHIPPLE. BDITH 
"Rdo" 

LiHbon, N. Dak. 

PMIa 

V. II. < . I 

"Shi "in •!<• almost tttrylMnf." 



WHITE, .ioiin w. 
"Poraj '* 

l.<>» A«»u«-I«*j«. Cal. 

Itastball (/> 
Football (I and -■> 

B ■•»!. I'.' I 




WHITING, Kill HI. 
"Whltoy" 

III",' < ".-nlrjil ,\».-. 

Virginia. Minn. 



I many ju.'l 
IIV hum Ihrrt h iflhim in it." 



WILCOX. ROSCOE B. 

Row oe" 

Motion City. Iowa 
"On* u-h- 'I hn mark." 



WILLIAMS. CAROL 
"Corrio" 

I till l'lliv.r>il> Ave. 

Witohita, Kan. 

$i 1 W.C l I'hiloU) 

"What a -ft will be no 

talking in li 



ay- Five 





W II, 1. 1 AMS. Rt'TH V. 
"Rufua" 

Fos I --> k«-. \\"i-. 



WINGRKEN. LII.I.1 \N 
"Lilly" 

2634 Llth Are. S. 
M inncapoliw, Minn 



WINKLEV, RLI.EX M. 
"Slivent" 

Faribault, Minn. 



"Sk4 mores a grxl/le ike rest of us." 

queen." 




* 



WIRTII, LILLIE M. 

•I.ill- 



Hancock, Iowa 



WOIILERS, OTTO 
"Dutch" 

IJiM-k Rapid*, Iowa 



\\<U\!!N. HAZEL \V\ 
"Hani" 

Tiii«Tl«ni . U i«. 



IhtT member of the SHARK "When he's sood he's very i>r>-i <ind "We like to hear her music." 
family." when he's bad he's reli;, 





WOLFF, MINNA M. 
"Minna" 

Bird bland, Minn. 

Y. W. C. 
Pkilo 

'If Edi 



WORDEN. I.IKU.A 
"Lualla" 



WO HUMAN. NAN 
"Work'am" 

Waal I).!'.,... Wia. 



Walworth, Wia. 
PMC 

makes mt "I ." U and my 

loft me." 




YOUNG, EDITS « 
"B" 
59 N. Park Ay*. 
Oahlraeh, Wia. 

' Vogue' 
on good la 



YOUNG. MARION C. 
"Chubby" 
220 W. N. Water St. 
Keenah, Wfa». 

marbl* brvu- it marrtd ■»:!;■ 
wrinkles." 



ZEIDLER, FLORBN4 I 
"Ditto" 

2] s. Brown St. 
NIadiaon, Wia. 

every one k 




XII. I.MAN. IIAKOI.I) A. 
"/.ill" 



ZIMMERMAN, ALBERT .1. 
"Zitftfic" 



IIAUMON. STELLA A. 



Thorp, w i«. 



Mi-iiomiuiii-. \\'i*. 



< Mon, Iixl. 



■ : ier if he finds good deiign kit plumbing (last "Wt ha.-e knonm her by her good 

at Ike Annex." and indoor baseball." rkt." 



BRADLEY, MARTIN J. 
"Brad" 

Sterling, Okla. 

Hikers (/) Oa:>. 

"We knew kirn by kit good works 
and his r.tr ready, friendi 

"Head" is teaching at Thort:. 



LOVELL, BDGELY W. 
"Edrfely" 

Omro, U'ia. 



Fmj more expenmc 
or aw: 

"Edgety" is tracking at Plat 
Wiser: 



KECK, BVERETT It. 

"lurk" 

Spring Valley. Minn. 

Annua 

"Unlike kit friend. 'Windy', oliho 
always out for a good time." 

Teathing at Spring Valley. Minn. 



Page Sixty-Eight 







Jmilo* Class Oi-ilcsirs 



l-l.ul |> .1, SMITH 

!'r.-.i<l<Mil 



MARY MACLIN 

Vioo-Prcnidcn i 



BEATRICE BRUCE 
-. ■ rotary 



M IRGARET WKI.VIKK 



, f^'^B 








k. ^r 5 


<*#: ^A 


Mm^f * i^Mm B» - 


/^ vLi^^Ar — >- *^^L -^*J 



Pa«e Sevwuy-Two 



Jjoji £icis2i'cs Jimioars 



ALDRIDGB. ALICE M. 

Ki.lnrl.. \\ i«, 

ALLEN, FLORENCE 

Heetor, Minn. 

AMUNDSEN, PLOREN4 S 
222 B. Patf* St. 

Sl. Paul, Minn. 

ANDERSON, MABEL 

786 Wmllm St. 

Si. Paul, Minn. 

ANDERSON, RUTH <:. 

8328 Second Ave. 

M ill ninpi.li-.. Minn. 

ANDERSON, SARAH K. 

MayrUle, n. Dak. 

ARMOUR, K. VKI.MA 

Moni|..vi. \\ i». 

ASHTON, LAURA 

Belmont, Win, 
AVERILL, ELLA 

Durand, \\'i-.. 
BABOOCK, CORA 

Elk River, Minn. 

BARBER, HELEN M. 

208 E. Jaffenon s.. 

WiimtIv. [ewa 

BARRETT, DOROTHY 
61? Bench Si. 

< ialana, III. 

BBCKFBLT, KATHERINB 

( ■ i.i 1 1 < I Rapid*, Minn. 

BERRY, HAZEL 

Blensburtf, Waah. 

BJORKQCIST, MARY 

888 W. -Mih Si. 

Milwaukee, \* is. 
BLACK, JULIA 

Lake Benton, Minn. 

BLAKE, VERA 

!>."»! Woodlawn \\.-. 

Rookford, III. 
BLAKBLY, ANNA M. 

2982 Dean Blvd. 

Minneapolia, Minn. 

BOCK, ESTHER 

vL'n Si\i!, Si. 

Manomonie, Wia. 
BOSS, AONE8 

1028 B. Superior St. 

Duluth, Minn. 



BOUCHARD, HELEN 

.'{.'{.'{ Lincoln Ave, 

Kan I 'laire, Wk 

BROWN, RUTH 

687 BeUaforts A*e. 

Oak Park, in. 

BRUCE. BEATRICE 

820 W. Av. 

Waukesha, Wia, 

Hll.l.KN. ELIZABETH L 
808 W. Kid St. 

Pueblo, Colo. 
BURKLAND, NXOMA 

7!l Roj altOD \% ••. 

Minneapolia, Minn. 

BUZICK, EDITH A. 

Hettinger, N. Dak. 

CALKIN. KITH M. 

648 E. 18th Si. 

Minneapolis, Minn. 

CALWAY, BERNICR 

682 Daris St. 

Port land, < tee. 
CAREY, MARIAN 

246 Sheboygan St. 

Pond «ln Lao, Wia. 

CARMODY, MONICA A. 

Mount Hope, ft la. 

CARPENTER. MARIE E. 

St. Peter, Minn. 

< ASE, M. LOUISE 

2008 Prairis St. 

Milwaukee \\'i-. 

(ASHMAN. BOSS 

( >w nl. .nil. i. Minn. 

CHRI8TIANSON, ALMA 

< i ookaton, M Inn. 

(I iSBEY, ELIZABETE 

Siiviinnnli. Mo. 

CLASSENS, PHYLLIS 

Frankfort, Mioh. 

COLE, ELIZABETH 

880 E. Main St. 

Mimkiitii. Minn. 

CONDTE, GLADYS 

US lltl. Are. W. 

Menomonle, Nv i-. 

CONWAY, GERTRUDE 
204 Madison St 

Kan ( Slaire, Wis. 



Page Sevtnty-Thrrc 




Page Scvonty-Kour 



IDosnssiic sJeiesrcii Jmiiotfs 



< ORBY, MARION 

US S. Monro* A v. . 

Given Baj . Wia. 

CORLISS, MARGUERITTE 

Reedeburtf, Wia. 

CRAMER, GEORGIA 

003 !-"ir-t Si. 

Merrill, w i«. 

CRONK, ELVA K. 

M. n. .m. .nil-. \\'i~. 

DAHL, ESTHER 

Twin Valle> . Minn. 



DECKER, VIOLA 



Chilton . Wm. 



DEHLER, MARIE I.. 

2007 Mitoholl 

St. Joseph, Mo, 

DENNINGER. ESTHER 
US V Btfa St. 

\\ .1 l.rl..\\ ll. \\ i». 

DRY. CATHERINE 

117 Eaul Are. 

Waukeaha, Wis. 



DONNELLY, IHMA 



Inoka, Minn. 



DROWN, KITH I.. 

Sordhotf, Cal. 

DUNNING, FRANCES 

mp7 Aahland Av* 

Si ■ Paul, Minn. 

BARLE, AIM K 

201 H . Semii 

( ir.-.u. ,i-l I.-. In. I. 

EDWARDS, DORA 

Me* L'lm, Minn. 

ENG, LAURA 

92 Uii, Ave, W. 

M. n. .in. .nil'. Wis, 

ENGLER, LORETTA 

I \>-w (oh, s. Dak, 

FBLDKIRCHNER, ETHEL 

Baal rioo. Nab. 

PLANIGAN, MONICA 

2440 liiiniiM.ii At* s. 

M in neapolla, Minn. 

KKASIKK. WINIFRED 

! • Bend, Minn. 



FREBLAXD, GRACE 

Fnlda, Minn. 

FRENCH. ALICE M. 

taios. Charlotte St. 

Eseanaba, Midi. 

FRICKB, JESSE 

Plaint iew, Minn. 

GALE, ADELAIDE 

Medford, Wla. 

GARDENER. KITH 

221 s. 0th 

Cherokee, [oh .i 

GBFFERT, QUANTTA 

Reedaburd, Wia. 

GOETZENBERGER. HELEN 
2631 Emerson Aee, s. 

MinneapoliM, Minn. 

GOLDBERG, BARA 

2020 BUa Court 

Marinette, w i-. 

GOOD, ALICE 

230 s. Elm si. 

Kew anee, HI. 

GOODNOUGH, GLADYS M. 

Anoka, M inn. 

GOODRICH, NADINK II. 

Manton ille, M inn. 

GRANER, CHARLBTTE 

KeUotf, Minn. 

GRIMSTAD, ESTHER 

Barn void, \\'i«. 

HAMILTON. EVELYN 

M eatfield, Wia. 

IIANNAN, MARY 

158 Proapeel Aee. 

M Ilwaukee, \v i«. 

HANSEN, LAURBNTZA 
103 Waah. si. 

i ledar Fulls, l<>« •> 

HARDY, H INNIK 

M..n.l..\ i, \\'i». 

II VRRIS, MABEL 

Chippewa Falla, \\'i-. 

HARRISON, LUCILLE 

1910 Dayton tfe. 

Sl. Paul, Minn. 

HELLER, ESTHER 

S21 WOsor. \%«-. 

Menomonie, Wia, 




Page Seventy-Six 



Domesiie £jclaii.CB J'ssiioirs 



BENEMAN, LBONA 

I'i'iiiliiiiii. N. I>.ik 

HOGAN, ELEANOR 

189 Bidwoll Ave. 

Sl. Paul. Minn. 

HOWARD, WINIFRED 

Whit* Kiirlh. Minn. 

HOYT, CHARITY 

« li;i-il.lirii. Win. 
Ill SS\. LRONA 

1 136 Sun.- Si. 

I .i < 't.i — •-. Win. 

JAMBS, EDITH I.. 

1872 Grand Ave, 

Sl. I'iiiiI. Minn. 

JAMBS. BLSIE 

Mineral Point, Wie, 

JENSEN, CHRISTINA 

Oaatfe, Iowa 

JOHNSON, RUTH K. 

3200 Bad Ave. s. 

Minneapolis Minn. 

JONES, MAUI 

304 Baal Arch St. 

Portland, Ind. 

KEEP, GERTRUDE 

( Sold wa tar, Mioh. 

KELLBY, PALICITAS 
1603 Vim St. 

Lit Cro i ie, Wia, 

KIDDER, RUTH II. 

R. p. i). No. :•> 

.1.1 111.— low ii. N. Y, 

KLEIN, RUTH 

1107 Chandler Avo. 

Bvanet ill,-. Ind, 

RNAUF, PLORENCE 

97-89 Sheldon Si. 

Hou4hton, Mich, 

KOCH, EVELYN 

i\i i Union St. 

Apple ton, Wia. 

KOOPMAN, HARRIET l>. 

fil.'l Ijinrrl Ave, 

St. Paul, Minn. 

LANGEN, BLBANOB 

Hiil 1 l<< Lake, M inn. 

LaSHELLB, HAZEL 

\l .ii -ii.iihi.w n, Iowa 



LAWRENCE, ANNA S. 

Springfield, Minn. 

LEE. ALICE 

131B Pourth Si. 

IIii.Ui.ii, w le, 

LIBERT, l. II. I.IAN 

1026 Seventh Ave. 

Anliiio. Wia, 

LUCKERT, LILLIAN B. 
MO Itfleharl Ave. 

Si. Paul, Minn. 

LUITEN, PEARL 

Glenooe, Minn. 

LYONS, MAE l., 

616 Rldftewood Ave. 

Minneapolis, Minn. 

MeCARTHY, GERTRUDE 

Milan City, Mi .... 

MeCORMICK, Mils. MARY 

( Sreen Bay, \\'i». 

MeDBRMOTT, 1.1 I.I.I an 

Bhullaburd, Wia. 

MeHENRY, KATHRYN A. 

New Richmond, Wia. 

MeHENRY, AGNES 

New Richmond, VI i-. 

MoKENZIE, I8LA1 

1 168 W. Minnehaha St. 

Sl. Paul, Minn. 

MoKENZIE, MAEFRED 

Mllkwiilliniu, Win. 

MaGEB, I.I.OKA 

Little Pall*, Minn. 

MARSH, VIRGINIA 

Diilnlli. Minn. 

MARTIN, PRANCES 

Michigan < it \ , Ind. 

MARVEN, KATHERINE 

Hutchinaon, Minn. 

MATT80N, MAM IK 

213 Chandler Ave, 

Bveleth, Minn. 
MAURER, ERNA 

MadCord, H la. 
MEANS. RUTH A. 

Bdtfai . II la, 

MERENCESS, ALICE R. 
Ms k. Grand Ave. 

Beloit, Wia. 



Page Scveni) 



Dosniz iridic i JusilofZ 



MICHAELSON, MSA 

Darlington, \\ i». 

MIDDLETON, BLSIE M. 

M .u --li.il I. Minn. 

MILLER, MILDRED 

Mi nomonie. W i». 

MILLER, ORIAXNA 

Ryder, N. Dak. 

MOLINE, BEATA M. 

Artf) 1" . Minn. 

MORSE, BTHEI.YN 

Riohland Cenltr, Wia. 

MURRAY, VERB M. 

( i ran In Pnaa, • >r«-. 

MUSEUS, CHARLOTTE 

Chetek, VI i». 

XKII.SKN. LETTA M. 

Mankato, M inn, 

KELSON, BLSA M. 

168 Murk- 

Kenoeha, wi». 

NEWMAN, AMY F. 

;:<< Prairie \%.-. 

Renoaha, \v i-. 

NORGAARD, OLO \ 

Oranlto Falla, Minn. 

OW Is. HANNAH 

i.v:i < .... k s,. 

Spokane, \\ aah. 
OLSON, FANNIE 

ll". B. Second si. 

Mi nomon te, ll .» 
OLSON, EVA 

.'.! 28 Park Ave, 

Minnoapolia, Minn. 
OJ BON, l. II. I. IK 

701 W . Mdin Si. 

Ada, M inn. 
OSBECK, PERN 

Lake Benton, Minn. 

OSTERBERG, h IZBL B. 

-Hut .l.iiii. - Vve, 

Minnaapolia, Minn. 

PADDOCK, Aiim s. 

Oak I'l.rk. Minn. 
PAYME, DELLA 

9 .'nil Si. 

Bamboo, Vl'ia, 

PBARCE, IMOGENE 

Litoher, s. Dak. 



PETERS, LOTTIE 

Weal Bend. Wia. 

PETERSON, FLORBNI B M. 

SIS -M !, S!. 

W'illmar, Minn. 

PINAt'LT, yVETTE 

si. Joaoph, M... 

PLUMMER, MABLE 

920 6th Si. 

Menomon 
POULSON, GLADYS 

Caatlewood, N. Dak. 
RADBR, LEONA 

i >n lario, • >n-. 

RANDALL. LAURA 

708 Daj inn ,\i 

Si. Paul, Minn. 

REID, LOIS 

834 Aahland Ave. 

Si. Paul, Minn. 

ROCK, MILDRED 

"■'-' 1 win i In..]. Ave. 

Chicago. 111. 

ROLLINS, MARION n. 

VI i-. Si. 

K.ii in.-. \\ i». 

i;i fCSTRUM, OLGA 

•5— *'» s. Marquette Si. 

Iron wood, Mich. 

in (ill. MABEL .1. 

UK.'-.' Wilaon Ave 

M. -ii. .in. .in.'. W*M. 

SCH VRR. HELEN 

1012 Ton tli si. 

Men i' 

SHAFBR, ZEE 

Plj mouth, Ohio 

SHAFFER, MARGARET 

Aim. .ml. \\ i». 

SMITH. I.\ \ 

I'l-iiii. lew . Minn. 
SMITH, MAUD 

B20 Wilaon Ave. 

Menomonie, \\ i». 

SNEEN, MABEL 

1116 Third St. 

Menomon ie, \* i». 

STROBEL. GLADYS 

87 Hun hi Si. 

Houghton, Mii-li. 



ID omsstis iEJeismes Jimioars 



STHIIWUi. SKI. I. 



VINCENT. AGNUS 



Alma. Km. 



Mill. .11. U i-. 



SYDOW, KLSIK P. 



Waukeaha, Wla. 



TANNERT. GEORGIA B. 

Si. ...win. .11, Win. 



TKKRANT, I.VDIA 



Dura... I. Wia. 



TASCHB. LILLIAN 

830 s. Sth St. 

si..i...\ 'dan. Win. 

T.\i LOR, MARGERY 

216 K. Ml. Si. 

M ichigan City, I u.l. 



TEED, LUCILLE 



Mi.iixI.iii. \\ i~. 



TESTMAN. KITH 

608 N. 7il. Si. 

('.i.iii.l ImIiiii.I. N.'ll. 

THOMPSON, PEARL K. 

Norlli Grand \\'i». 

TRBGOKINO, GRETA 

Adrian. Minn. 

THKIIIS. SKI.MA 

Sprinft tii'.v.-, Minn. 

TUNNEL, DOROTHY 

:{7(Ht Portland Arm. 

Minneapolla, Minn. 

BEBELE, LILY 

.'{(is Sumner Si . 

Hartford, Wla. 

URFBLS, LEORA 

.'ML? Ilnrri- At ••- 

Hnncook, Mioh. 

VAN DUZEB, M.U 

!MHt Main si. 

Menomonie, W .-. 

VAN STRATUM, BVALYN 

»»»;: Morriaon St. 

\|.|.l.-l..ii. \\'i«. 



VOBLKER. EDNA 

728 w Kind St. 

\\ in. .mi. Minn. 

WALLACE, DAISY 

1*» V.t i Si . 

Dululli. Minn. 

WARE, CON8TANCE 

Branm ill.-. \> i». 

WARE. BUZABBTH 

625 Km. Ave, s B. 

Minneapolis, Minn. 

WEBSTER, KM M\ 

Itiii Timber, Mont. 

WBDDBLL, NELLIE 

l.'T N". Ur<.« u Si. 

Rhlnelander, Win, 

WEGENER, IRENE \ 

Boela, s. Dak. 

WEIMER, MARGARET 
1314 N. 6th sl 

Sli.'l...\ C-an. \\ is. 

WELLS, HENRIETTA T. 
1217 Powell Si. 

Sl . Joseph, Mn. 

WILLIAMS, CARRIE D. 

1106 Benaon Are. w . 

Will mar, Minn. 

WINEGAR, GLADYS 

169 N. Taylor Ato. 

Oak Park. III. 

WOHLERS, EDNA 

U...k Rapid*, h.wa 

WOLD, ESTHER P. 

r.M Bidhth si. s. i:. 

Minneapolla, Minn. 

ZARING, EDITH C 

Reeievflle, In. I. 

ZUBHLKB, PLORET 

1237 Second St. 

Apple) \\ i-. 







Jamiary 191 £3 GfcradTia-ies 



CASK. I.OI'ISK 

2006 Prairie Sir.-.-i 

M ilwaukee. \l i-. 

K< KM ANN. ALICE B. 

Hendrum. Minn. 

FREEMAN, KATHLEEN 

Raoinc, \* i-. 

FROELIGH, NORMA 
The Pines 

M .m.iiiii. n I.-. \\ i». 

OENTZ, DORA M. 

M Inn. —..In l.nk.-. \Vi-. 

QRIOLBY, RCTH 

U BUM ..!..-.. i. W i». 

IIEINER, MARTHA 

Lowdnti li>%\n 

IIOLLI8TER, MARY 

Mukwonatfo, ^ i». 

I8ENBBRO, ELSIE 

". 1 ". Pint) Si i<i. i 

I ,.l ( IrOMMC. \\ i-. 



MeKEON, MARIE 

Mon i Corner} . Minn. 

MAC!. IN. MARY 

1123 \\ . I'Jili \w. 

Spokane, Wiuth. 

N'EMECK, MILDRED 

< '.il_-nr> . Canada 

PINNEO, ALICE M- 

( Hear* iter, Minn. 

SCHEBLB, ESTHER 

120 W. Main Street 

Willi* Jllo-.:. ^V I-. 

>< OTT. HAZEL 

721 Don \m-. 

Rhinelandcr. Wim. 

SULLIVAN. RUTH 

306 Plral A»e. N. ]■:. 

Mandan, N. Dak. 

SW ANSON, IS ll IKK 

Wa*hbi] in. \* i-. 

U'OLLUM, !NCA 

MTaahburn. Win. 



i * ' w - ■■ a 



...» • 



HB£££5fii 




IViiisraal 'I^ining Junior 



BARTLETT, REX L. 

M ... > -»-. ill.-. Wash. 

BECKER, LLOYD 

La Cl .>».«-. Wi». 

BENJAMIN, RALPH 

Ash ton. low -i 

BIGBLOW, WALTER M. 
1102 N. 2nd Si. 

Clinton, Iowa. 

BLACKMAN, .1 \-» W. 

1305 Ttl. Si. 

Mouoim.ni.'. \\ i». 

BLUM, JOE 

l.-,: N. 2nd si. 

Highland Park, III. 

BRADSHAW. RAYMOND M. 
Drawer M . 

Topeka, Kan. 

BUSS, ARTHUR 

111 3rd St. 

Mrnomonic, \\'i-. 

CLARK, HARRY <:. 

316 N. 10th Si. 

Mil.- City, Mont. 

CROCKETT, HARRY 

Bianco, Aria. 

I>IIKI\. <>. I. 

333 I luff man Am . 

1 i.niim, < »lii<> 

DOCKAR, JAMES W , 

Winnaperf. I bi 

BRICKSON, ARTHUR G. 

B23 ill. Baal 

W'illmar, M inn. 

BRDUTZ, ROBERT W. 

Mcnomonie. M ich. 

FEIST. WILLIAM 

2121 3rd Si. 

Mvnomon '»■. w i». 

PIELDSETH, IIKNK1 

109 N. Curry St. 

Iron wood, Mioh. 

FLEENER, GLEN B. 

l)...lii'- < '••iil.T. Minn. 

FROGNBR, HERBERT 

K h i n.l.ili.l. r. \\ i~. 



FR1 Kl AND. C. VERNIE 

< lloquol . M inn. 

GILLARD, CII IRLES 

Glon\ ill"'. Minn. 

GIN8BACH, JOHN A. 

BImwoodi K'u. 



HAGER, CARL J. 



Jefferson, Wia. 



HAMILTON. WILL 



I >u : ..ml . W I -. 



II KNSEN, ORIN 

S23 N. 10th s.. 

Mani low ■"■. w Is. 



II a SSL. OTTO W, 



Monroo, W i^. 



HARSHBARGER, P. R. 

Menomonic, \% i-. 



IIIPAKKA. AUGUST 



HOLM, EIFFEL A. 



Lly. Minn. 



Willinar. Minn. 

HOVLID, LEONARD M. 
232 Taintar St. 

Mono in.. ii i.-. N\ i-. 

HUNTER. FLOYD M. 

2224 B. W alniit St. 

Des Moines, Ion ■> 



KAKN'S, CLOYD II. 



Parkor, Ind. 



KIRST. ARTHUR J. 

Miahioot, Wla. 

L1DD1 . ARTHUR 

M. n. .in. .ii I.-. \\ I-. 

MolNTOSH, ROBERT i>- 
B02 6th St. 

\\ in. .nil. Minn. 

MACLEAN. CHARLES It. 

Britton, S. Dak. 



\| \Si IN. (ill 



Pepin, Win. 



MAUCH. EARL D. 

Moun i Pleasant . Iowa 

MELGARD, ALFRED M. 

Ruahford, Minn. 



Mamisil 'I 1 ! ■ziiiiisig Jmnorz 



MBBEBN, DONALD K. 

S629 Colfaa An.-, s. 

Minneapolis! Minn. 

MINSK. PHILIP F. A. 

1206 Stepheneon Ave. 

Menomonie, Midi. 

MOLDENHAUER, EDWARD I- 
219 Emerald St. 

WatertOWIt, N\" i-.. 

Mil. HOLLAND. ROBERT P. 

Menomonie, Mien. 

KELSON, SIGNOB K. 

Ada, Minn. 

NORDSTROM, khans 

Walnut Gove, Minn. 



PABST, H'lLLMAB 

Mondoi i. \\ i». 

PEPIN, QEOBOE B. 

Pi j nee ton, M [eh . 



PHISK. .IOSKIMI S. 



Ely, Minn. 



PUBD1 . P. L. 

1315 Ellis Blvd. 

Cedar Rapida, [on ;> 



SANKEY, VERB 



Durand.WL*. 



sv\ AGE, JOHN L. 

Anaoonda, Mont, 

SAXHAUG, ORPHIE K. 

Perdue Falls, Minn. 



SCHAEFER. STfART 



Kl>. Minn. 



scut >n\ m: mo \. 



SCIIOTT. .1 \( <>h «;. 



Salem, I >>• 



Sill. -111. I >! ■■. 



SCHULZ, BDGAB K. 
316 8th St. 

Wiili-rlinvn, \\'i«. 

BCRU IN<;. ABTHUB 
l Ru« St. 
JaoQuea, Chann, Franoe 

8HATTO, BDSON 

w 'auaau, w i». 

SMALLWOOD, BURTON 

Minot, N. Dak. 

SMITH. FLOYD .L 

Jeffet -••!>. \v'i-». 

SPRAGUE. LAUREN P. 

Rod Wind, Minn. 



STAIIL. FRED 



Pepin, ^ i». 



STANTON, HOMER L. 
ISO! Kirl.y Ave. 

Munsie, IniL 

STEINKE, BERBERT A. 
Btuben St. 

Wauaau, Wia. 

TEWS, ARTHUR A. 

Woukoaha, \\ 1-. 

WARD, EDMUND J. 

River Falla, w la. 

WEGG, ROBERT 

Monroe, Wis. 

WERRELL, ANGU8 J. 

Menomonie, Wis. 

WICHERSKI, w II.L1AM K. 

II S. Si. it« Si. 

Sew [Jim, Minn. 

W IGGBN, KM AN p. 

Black River Falls, Wis. 



rmoc I 







big Tfcftdft 



Bis 



KEHLBERG, li. FULLER, TERRENCE ROBERTS. EUGENE 

ONNOa ^ i-. Manomonie, \\ i~. Minneapolis 



STAHL, FRED 

IVpin. \\ i«. 



HILTON*, J. R. 

Chicago. III. 



THOMPSON, LINDSAY 

( 'l.-nr I_it k<-. Wis. 



OLSON, MKI.VIN A. 
Aim-ry. Wis. 



I*a*e Eighty-Five 



Jn illruuirtam 



(6rnrar iflnrrisrii 

$al|ih S. $uiith . . 

OilaiUis Ziritlrr . . 

latttTB 11 rr . . . 



(Man nf 1913 
&.&.of 1U15 
(BUua uf 131 5 
Glass of 191 fi 





'J J li2 Simri Picnic: 

A I.I. aboard for Picnic Point! "Undo Sam" lay at anchor at the pier 
■**■ on Lake Menomin, and soon a gay bunch of merry makers thronged 
her deck. Ii was October third, a glorious day and all were eager for 
tin- pleasure before them; so eager thai they crowded on that not overlj 
substantia] pier, and only a loud voir.- accompanied by much gesturing, 
crying "Stay back, stay back, I say*" prevented their ardor from being 
dampened. As the number of the fairer sex outnumbered the male sex, 
there was hot rivalry as i<> who should <!<> the gallant acts, such as helping 
the ladies ascend t«> the top of the boat. For some reason or other, on 
which we shall nol comment, Meesers Mulholland and Benjamin %% <>n the 
honors of the day and soon were happily employed in assisting the ladies 
to take "The Step." In a very short time we reached the grounds, and 
had the pleasure of being assisted i<» alight and then the fun began. 

The first feature was a hand ball game, Junior girls versus Senior, 
in two reels. Again Mr. Mulholland captured the honors and distinguished 
himself bj calling five outs on the Juniors and as many Seniors safe on 
first. The Juniors then attempted to coach the Seniors, advising them t<> 
rui\ on i'«»uls and where thej were sure of being put out. At this provo- 
cation there was a class rush and Mr. Blum sometimes found himself on 
tin- hott. »m and again sometimes he would find that he was up enjoying 
the fresh air. After considerable firing between the lines and much can- 
nonading, peace and order were restored by Mr. Brunkow . and the game 
went serenely on. Time was called and the score st....d in the favor of the 
Juniors. After all this excitement the nun'-, game was comparatively 
tame; at the end of the fifth Inning it was found that things stood as they 
usually do, in favor <>t" the Seniors. 

Then it wits that Stout defeated her purpose, in the way of inviting in- 
digestion by asking the men t«» participate in the "Animal Feeding Con- 
test." The gamo called for twelve men and continued t«> call for them, 
hut was twelve men sh> for several minutes; in fact, they were ><> shy that 
main force had i<» be everted upon them. Then some were rather shy 
about the manner in which they accepted food, while one made a hasty 
exit, during which time the sun was darkened by cracker crumbs in motion. 

Next in order, the ladies were called upon to exhibit their >kill as 
knockers. Some knocked fingers; some knocked the log; and some knocked 
nails, while over their shoulders came the encouraging remarks, "Put it 
in with two blows," or "Don't try to put two nails in the s;iiue place." 

"Wisconsin" represented bj Alice I was victorious and with an eloquent 

address. Mr. Gilbert presented her with a Stout seal pin. 

Exit women! Forward men! imagine if you can the spectacle of eight 
men seated tailor fashion on the ground, four needles at had, four pieces 
of thread over one knee: and a fair judge behind and "Victory or die" print- 
ed on each face. "Practice makes perfect*' and Mr. Gilbert won. Mr. 
M.iiithe presented the prize. 

Now the best part of the day was at hand. "Eats" were announced. 

All things must come to a close and even a Stout Picnic is no exception. 

As the moon rose it found the crowd once more aboard "I'ncle Sam." 

differently diffused of course, than on the outward trip, hut homeward 
bound with lighter hearts and pleasant memories of companionship. 

.1. C. B. 







IT may !><• of interest i<> the readers of the Annual to know how the work 
i> oarriod on in tl>«> Homemakers' Schools found throughout Denmark. 
These schools arc private and are tin- only ones thai offer a Domestic 
Science course of this kind. Thej are vastly different from the schools 
in i his count i>. 

This particular school 
Vaeldegaard, which I 
attended, i* located 
about seven miles from 
Copenhagen, at the edge 
of one of the Royal 
Parks. It is t li «- oldest 
1 1 o 111 i- m a k r i- ' * or 
"Hon* <■ m o t h i- r ' 8*' 
School in Denmark. 

Because il i«- BO old 

it consists of rambling 
and picturesque build- 
ings of %i hich there are 
three; a large main 
liiiililinii. and two w tngs. 

A well equipped gymnasium i> located near the main school in which the 
girls hold their parties and entertainments as well as the regular gym work. 

The teaching staff at the school is composed of a director, who vviili 
her daughter owns the school, two cooking teachers, a baking teacher, a 
teacher In household management, art needle work and plain sewing and 
another for theory work. Bach teacher belongs to a ••family" of the 
girls and >it» at her "family's" table during the meals. 

The girls are divided into families of six members each, and as a rule 
there are thirty-six enrolled. Bach familj is lettered and each member 
of the family numbered; each girl keeps her number for a week, and then 
takes the following number. When she has had all six numbers she be- 
comes a member of another family. 

Vfter the first »i\ weeks, the six families arc divided into two independ- 
ent families and four dependent families. The brightest and most capable 
girls are put into the independent families. 

In order to give a clearer idea of the work, it might !><• well to tell Just 
how one of the independent housemothers, who i* the number one of the 
familj . spends her day. The first bell rings at six-thirty. At seven o'clock 
she must be in the kitchen ready to begin preparations for the first meal 
which consists of oatmeal and figs. This i* served at seven-thirty, and all 
the girls are supposed to l>«- present, but many have the habit of getting 
up late. After this meal, the housemother and all the other girls go to 

the Living r n for morning prayers. When prayers are over, each one 

goes to work, the housemother's duty being to wash the dishes. After 
those are put away, the housemother, with tin- help of the other inde- 



pendent housemother, prepares the breakfast one makes the coffee 
while 1 1 *« • other toasts the bread. At eight-thirty the breakfast bell rings, 
and all the girls must be present ;>t t h i>» meal. After tin*, the dishes are 
again washed and put aside; the housemother rolls the butterballs for the 
rest of the day and for the next breakfast. IVTien 1 1 1 « - other members of 
the families are through with their morning work, thej all father in the 
kitchen and the head housemother lectures i<> them on the meals for 1 1 * < - 
d;i\ just how to prepare them and the food value of each. After the 
lecture, the second and third members of the families commence the 
preparation for the dinner. The housemother directs « I » « - work, and 
answers anj questions that the members of her family maj ;i»k. When 
the dishes accumulate, she washes them and puts them awa3 and thus 
keeps the kitchen in ;i neat, orderly condition. On Tuesdays and Thurs- 
days, every one has extra work to do, and the housemother always makes 
.hi elaborate dessert, for on Tuesdays either ;« formal luncheon or ;i vege- 
tarian dinner is served; k lii!«' on Thursdays there is always a formal dinner. 
Dinner is served ;it twelve-thirty. All the girls wear clean white aprons 
and caps for this meal, and it i~ ;■ verj prettj sight to see so many of these 
girls in their uniforms. The housemother >it^ at 1 1 » * - head of her table 
and performs s > 1 1 t !*«• duties of ;i hostess. On Thursday the dinner hurts 
longer than usual and afterwards coffee is served in the living rooms, and 
about fifteen minutes is spent in ;■ social way. It is rather unpleasant to 
have to clear away the dishes after a five course dinner but it all belongs t<> 
the duties of ji home and ;:•> - * 1 * the girls work together it does not take so 
long. The housemother is the last to leave the kitchen since she must 
inspect everj thing to see that all is in place and in good condition. When 
everything is in order, she may go to her room and rest for an hour, after 
which she dresses for the afternoon. At three-thirty she goes to the main 

<liiiiiiii room and o ■■ is served by the bakers. One of the regulations <>t' 

the school is that every girl must do ;■ certain amount of walking everj 
day. The housemother may attend to her marketing ;it this lime. The 
time from five-thirty to eight-thirtj i-» spent in lectures and preparation 
of the evening meal and evening's work. The period after supper i> used 
by the girls for sewing, conversation, music or literature. Ten-thirty is 
considered bed time and the lights go out at that time. 

Among the duties of the housemother is the keeping of accounts and 
making both ends meet. It is the exceptional girl who is able to save 
above the allowance. The housemother i*> responsible for the affairs and 
management of 1 1 1 « - family and cannot ask another to take her place in 
case she desires to occupj herself otherwise. 

The work of the other members of the family may be compared with 
the housemother's work with the exception that it i* easier and less re- 
sponsibility is attached. 

I found this to be a practical course for a girl who does not intend to 
become a teacher of Domestic Science. I left the school feeling that I haul 
spent eighteen weeks at pleasant and very profitable work, during which 
time I had gained not only a knowledge and skill in managing the many 
daily problems of ;> home, but also that I had broadened mj life by contact 
with teachers and fellow students, all of whom worked in ;i co-operative 
manner toward the same ideal ;« well managed, orderly home. 

L. II. 




simmkk Session Stunts 



Past Nincty-T\ 



*L*h& Smsnns* Sssslom Picmic 



HPHK annual Summer Ses si on Picnic was held Saturday afternoon, 
A August 1st. ;ii Point Comfort, and it certainly was "some picnic.*' All 
morning the angels En the Domestic Science Department had labored at 
filling ni> the mysterious packages we discovered in the school entrance 
with iill the delectable things thai go i<» make up picnic dinners. And all 
morning long the prim shop devils, under the guidance of the "chief of 
she devils" had been busy printing tags bearing the names of all the various 
states and countries of the civilized world, outside of Menomonie, so that 
all might !>«• tagged for the event. All the forenoon while we were trying 
to conjure up a picture of a pleasant time, the sun was refusing to shine 
and our hopes were going further and further down. 

But about the time the first boal load had climbed aboard "Uncle Sam" 
en route to the Point, the clouds rolled away and the sun was shining as 
if it never meant to stop. 

When we arrived iit the Point we found long tables set out laden with 
those same mysterious packages and "Vulcan ;u the forge" firing up ready 
to heat something, we didn't know what. Herr Mauthe and I * ■ — assis- 
tants had arranged for various athletic events, and lots of fun they were. 
Loud applause greeted Buddj Brigham's successful attempt to thread the 
needle. He won't have t>> sev on his own buttons anj more as he is going 
to l»<- married soon. Likewise when Patrick won the race for heavy weights. 
They had some trouble enticing tin- ladies into an obstacle race, but they 
got started after awhile and squealed their way there and back. There 
were other stunts but they - » 1 1 faded from our memorj when the mega- 
phone sounded the call for "Pi" in line. See Miss IV. Such eats. 

I have been to many picnics before and supposed that it was necessary 
to have "spiders in the coffee and caterpillars on the cake" but never < 1 i«l 
I suppose that <;iis oould !>«• so good as they were at this picnic. The 
"man from Indiana" surely got "'liis money's worth" that time. Ask 
the printing class. 

Potato salad baked beans sandwiches .ill kinds including ..1<| dog 
Tray cake yellow bantam piping hot out of the big boilers that Vulcan 
had been tending coffee Real Coffee with cream, sugar and a spoon — 
and last of all— Mr. Buxton dishing out icecream. 

They sej tin- way to a man's heart is thru his stomach and I guess 

that's about right for as s ■ as the eats were gone the large family broke 

up into twos, sometimes fours who got back somehow and any old time. 

To be serious: I have been at other summer schools and have observed 
the attitudes of teacher and pupil and have wondered why there could not 
be some way of bringing them close together. I think Stout has found 
that way and feel thai the Picnic, coming early in the Session, unites all 
in a spirit of comradeship that cannot but make for better work. 

It was a great party and I hope i<- come back and have another like it. 
But there can't !>«• another like it because this was perfect and they can't 
do better. But I'm coming back to *«•«>. 

"The Man from Home." 
G. li. K. Jr. 




* _?> 



X 



jgWk »W|k4 ■}► 











Piiilo Oi-ilcfc 




BLANCHE im>i GH*n 


._ . ■. , . . 
CATHERINE i'n 


Kill III (MASK 


i'i . •-iiii-i 1 1 


S.-. r • ■lnr.v 


1 i.-;i»iii.i 


i:\ 1LYN KOCK 


Kl.TA JAMES 


GERTRUDE CONWAY 


Pmddenl 


Sv«-i . i .11 ) 


Tl ■•.l~II 1 ■! 



:;; '. 



'I J h -d .Phil o:msr£h B-an 

LITERARY work along well directed lines i> of Intrinsic value i«> every 
student, no matter what ids <>i- hex large aim in education may In*. 
[n-as-much as The Stout Ins! it ate is primarily a school lor training in Home 
Economics and Manual Training, some may fail to appreciate phases of 
other valuable work done bj 1 1 » « - student body. To give a brief resume of 
one of the promising organizations and it- work is 1 1 »«- purpose of tins 
article. 

During the past five years the Philomath ean Society has been b popular 
siikI grow ing organization among t li«- Domestic Economy students. Start- 
ing first w ii li a few enthusiastio and energet ic young women, ii has become 
more and more a society attracting the attention of man} students. This 
year's active membership enrollment includes over seventj names. 

The foremost aim of dramatic and literary societies i- to prepare 
their members that they may be able to address any audience with com- 
posure of manner and Inspiration of speech. They aim to make their 
members ready, willing and able to express clear out ideas in the best of 
English and in a pleasing manner. How has the Philomathean Society 
met these aims? The impromptu debate has led to quick, concise think- 
ing. Ii has overcome hesitancy of speech and has developed confidence. 

TIji- declamation has given dramatic touches i<> sp h and a vanetj to 

the vocabulary. And what of the current news items, the book reports 
and talks on various subjects? Surely they meet more than the literary 
aims they keep one acquainted with the world's workings of > i » « • present 
<lay. Musical appreciation has been combined with other branches of 
this organization. Otherwise unknown talent among the student body 
has been discovered and enjoyed. 

The soda] side must not be eliminated when considering the work of 
the club. Relaxation and genuine pleasure were experienced at tin- Philo 
meetings. The large club rooms of the Mabel Tainter Memorial building 
have afforded a most comfortable meeting place. Seeing one's school 
friends away from the school rooms and school subjects gives one an op- 
portunity of better and broader acquaintance. Therefore, the "get ac- 
quainted" spirit lias been encouraged and successfully developed. 

Much credit must be given to the officers of the society. Because of 
their earnestness and Ingenuity in making each meeting the best pos- 
sible, th«-y are worthy of sincere praise. The students are also indebted to 
the many faculty advisers and visitors for their kindly Interest, helpful 

suecest ions and hearty eo-opeia t ion. 

S. McQ. 






PMlo It oil 



Ruth Anderwon 
Plorenoo Allen 
Cora Baboook 
Bernioa !*•- 1 1 
Berniee lliirkcr 
Beaut !<■<• Bruoc 
Muriel Bronte 
M .11 \ Bjorkquief 
Marion < !oi •••> 
Rose < iuhman 
Pearl Chamberlain 
Gertrude Conwaj 

< .Kill \ -. ( '.Mill if 

Maurine * Som ■■> 
Kmili- Clark 
Km li < Ihiokerinjj 
Edith Chaee 
I losel < Sheeley 
Gladys Diok 
Jeanne Daane 
('ni harine Dey 
Blanoha Doutfhtj 
Iriiui Donnelly 
Jennie Denhom 
IC ii id Brown 
Monies Planitfan 
Lore! la Piustioi aid 
Ethel Peldkirohner 
Ruth Gridley 
Kiit li ( Irier 
Nadine Ooodi ieh 
I. mi i .-ni /.a I [onsen 
I )•.! oth) I lo%» aid 
Esther lieUer 
Bits Jamea 

Kal it li .l.imiH 

Kiln. I Klu l; 
K\ ; 1 1 > ii Kooh 



Katherine Know lew 
Bmil) Linhoif 
Mildred l.> man 

\ •_: ■ i € - -, Mi-lli'iirv 

Kal herinc Mel len r> 
Vere Murray 
Katherine Marvon 

.Inn. -I la- M.M.i-l. : 

Sin- MoQu i 

Tereuo MoDonoutfh 
< ia-ri rude Mot Sari hy 
Agnes MaCarl hy 
Annie MoCullontfh 
Lei in Keilson 
K»i her Kelson 
Mildred Rook 
Gladys Rorfjts 
Irma Riee 
Dorothy Randall 

1 is Raider 

/....■ Bohaffer 
Leone Si u i unmi 
Graoa Shutfarl 
Mildred Smith 

I la-la-ii Silimr 

Erne Thierfeldl 
Merna Tom tineon 
Leorfl I'rfele 
Maj Van I )uaee 
K\ nl) ii Van Si i-h) um 
Carol Williams 

Luolla \\..iili-ii 

Minna Wolff 

Pauline ^ andBohneidei 

Martfarol W'eimcr 

Edith Whipple 

Kal it 1 1 Zarinri 

Edith "■ ounj 




r.u, 



>iii'. 



MAURICE KELSON 

View Proddrn t 



ii \i:\ i.-\ SKUS* >N 

l , r.-.i<l.-Mt 



CHAR in di: 

i •. and Trpiwurcr 



II Oil 



Bclk, Clarenoc K. 
Brink man. Walter 
Brunkow . M r. 
Buxton, Mr. 
Chriatenaon, < Sari 
Chriatoffel, Mr. 
Clark, II. 

Coinatoek, Wallace 
('r<M-k«-i I . ! 

. Mi. 
Dh«in, O. !. 
Dreahcr. < i< 
Elk*. William 
Eallntfer, Mr. 
Gilbrrl . .1. I 



<• ti. W. II. 

' u«-k. Kri<l 
! f . ■ r-> 1 1 1 ■ i 1 1 -L-i-r. I*. K. 
1 1 >■ ■_•«■!<• n . Reinharl 
11%. I.-. Chnrl«« W . 
Little, Orlando It. 
Mimii-. Philip 
Kclaon, II 
N'.l-'ui. Ma 
Pieha, Lav 
Ril i.m . John 
Snndvltf, K<lv> In 
Sk»£»mark, i lerhart 
Steinke. Hoi 
Wilcox, Row 



Nine 




13 




Sa-yslssra lA'Z&x-sxry Homaty 



THE Gaveleera Literary Societj organized amonj the students of the 
Manual Training Department of Stout Institute for tl<«- purpose of 
creating n keener Fellowship and die development of ability in public 
speaking, among those who are so fortunate as to have boon members, 
closes with this session Its second successfu] year. 

That their work has been worth while is self evident, the development 
of the ;il>ilit i«-s of its members to speali before an audience is indeed notice- 
able. They have learned to do by doing. We are proud of this organiza- 
tion and justl) bo. There are among its members, men of the faculty who 
are enthusiastic in their praise and support of the organization. The 
work has been that of preparing papers, debating, and the study of par- 
liamentary Uth . 

It is with a feeling of regret that they think of their last meeting, for 
they will always remember the parliamentary tilts, and the friendly dis- 
cussions which do much ti> bring about that relationship which is most 
desirable among fellow students. 

\\'«- believe that the Gaveleera is a real feature of Stout lif<- and thai it 
shall always be a prominenl one, for there is embodied in tl>«- ranks of its 
members, the integritj <>t" spirit and high purpose which hold man to- 
gether. May the next year see the Gaveleera stronger than ever before. 




I'atr One-Hundred 



Thai 'Jioom-m 

For development of patience, 

Am<1 other Christian graces, 

There is nothing lik<- ;i roommate, 

To show you what your place is. 

She leaves no room for selfishness, 

You lose ;ill your conceit, 

It requires all your energy 

To keep your temper sweet. 

She borrows ;ill your Sunday clothes, 

Your charts and note books too: 

While pins and needles disappear 

Till nothing's left for you. 

When you've hours and hours of work to do 

She'll laugh and talk and sing, 

She fills the room with company 

So > on can't do a I hing. 

You work, and dig, and sew and toil, 

And ii«-t a mark of "G"j 

While that roommate studies not at all, 

And walks off with an "K." 

Her things are all about the room, 

She cares not how it looks. 

Sin- takes up all t he table 

With her sew Lng and her books. 

In the morning when you're hurrying, 

To be in time for class, 

You have to stand and comb your hair. 

With one square inch of glass. 

But when the fifth of June arrives 

And to all you hid adieu, 

^ on xv ill find it very hard to part 

From that girl who roomed with you. — K. M. W 



T<^ lieasou 'Why 

The reason, you ask, w hy we came to Stout : 
M> goodness, because it's so talked about. 
The I). S. course is so advertised, — 
That the girls who hear it are hypnotized. 
An<l the M. T. men come here, you know, 
'Cause it's the best school the states can show 
So Isn't that reason enough for you 
To come to Stout next year too? 
Perhaps you've not the right conception, 
Or maybe vou lack the keen perception — 
Therefore with pleasure, we lead you right, 
Yes, straight to Stout of the him- and white! 




I . ■ CM 





H- \'i Tli'^i 1 H t ^ sL 






Pai-c i l-Two 




'/SB* 




IlKltTII.X TAINTER I I.M.I. 




Bertha Taintbr Annex 



(>ii.-lliiii.lr<-<l-l- 



i i ' 11 mi ' mil' ■ i ' ' ' ' ' i ' «» 




- r 1 £ Tj DillTCl 



L. F. "IXiN O. C MAITIIK J. O. STEEXDAHL 

WALTER BIGELOV) < ». K. BRUXKOW 

BBRXICE BARKER CLAUDE FRENCH 



To tin- Athletic Board, we « l-li lo flive due <-r«-<lii f«»r the wuccr— rful handling of our Athle- 
tic* t!>i- year. Tl [forts of the Board haw aided Ui placing Athletics upon ■ > firm t>ji«i» 

and inaurea us tli«- oontinualion «>f il»- aereral forma, without financial l<>->- lo ■ ■>!.:• 
individuals. Special oommendation in awarded them f«>r the securing ■■* il><" Third Xorth- 
weatern tnteraeholastic Basket If. ill Tournament and f«>r • 1 »«- vary gratlfing way in whieh 
tha Tournament wax handled, 

Th. muii the work >•< the Board haa been altruatle in nature, ihej i>ii-«- shown ili< beat •• 

spirit 4i « nil timea and have, moved forward along linea wbleh have and w ill land lo plaoi 

Athletioa upon " highei plane. 

The treatment <>f individuals ban been appreciated because the rairneea and squareness 
which has • >> shown En 1 1 > ■ — connect [on i- ident leal witli i li«- standards which Stout holds 

in .ill Ikt in- 1 ivil i,-N. 




PARKS I.. BAILEY 
Coach and Captain 



LOUIS F. OLSEN OTTO ('- BAACK 

M ;l ll.i _;■•: - 



J. KDWAKI) GILBERT 
Trainer 



HERBERT LUN'DER 
Student Manatfar 



*3231£50:ri 



\miiimisy 



ON September fifteenth came the call. Volunteers were wanted, 
volunteer*) were needed f and volunteers must be had. In answer to 
this urgent call, thirty men stepped forward, putting aside fun and pleas- 
ure, ready to don the armor of the gridiron for 1 1 1 * - honor of Stout. Each 
and very one of these thirty men came forward with but one thought fore- 
most in his mind. Not personal gain, bul the honor and prestige they 
were helping Stout acquire through the ownership and maintenance of 
ii successful Fool Hall team. 

French, Bailey, Trebilcook and White, veterans of lasl year's squad, 
appeared among the volunteers, ready and willing t.» drop into the harness 
again, and slowly, bump • >> bump, and knock by knock, help whip into 
shape the team thai was t<> fight for Stout during the coming campaign. 
During the first fet* days of practice, under the leadership of Coaoh Bailey, 
the squad passed through the various stages of general practice; such as 
learning to fall on the ball, how to pass, how to block and how to tackle. 
Next came the signals, and, oh my, what a jumble. At first ii was rather 
difficult for the raw recruits to grasp the principles of the work, but thej 
s i awoke and translated the pigskin language. 

After a few days of preliminary work, the hard, relentless grind began, 
and each night the squad could be seen plugging awaj at practice long after 
the sun had settled in the western horizon. Soon the squad was divided, 
and now harder work began for signal practice had begun in earnest. 

Following signals, scrimmage began, and the two squads opposing 
one another, fought back and forth down the field, first one gaining, and 
then the other, using this play and that play, each doing its i>.-st to outdo 
the other. The Coach made some shifts in his lineup and before long 
divided his squad into two teams, one known ;is the first and the other the 
second or the scrubs. Did the scrubs quit? Far from it, their mettle was 
up. and they let it be known that they were out after the scalps of the first 
team. This determination proved strong, and their improvement great, 




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and before long two teams, the one having I i * 1 1 « - superioritj over the other, 

were fight big tor first place. 

As scrimmage practice continued, some were disabled and had to join 
the ranks of Dr. Yak, or be dropped from the squad entirely, until there 
were barely enough for two lineups. Time and again it became necessary to 
issue calls for new recruits to i" 1 1 1 their places. In answer to each cull 
some new man would respond, thus enabling the Coach to keep two teamH 
in training, therebj giving him a fine reserve us well as giving the first 
team the kind of practice they needed. 

Pake plays and signals were worked out and mastered by the team to 
be used in the coming bal ties against teams with heavier lines and composed 
of men who were old hands of the game. 

By October eleventh the team was In fair shape to bogan the campaign 
ahead of it, and on thai date, although the sun was In-hind the clouds 
and tin- atmosphere was heavy with moisture, the) trooped gallantly 
forth to the Fair Grounds to meet their first rival, River Falls. 

Arriving ;it the grounds they were greeted with the cheers of a large 
crowd who had braved the weather conditions in order that they could 
cheer their team on to victory. But alas! Although the team played a 
clean hard game, they could not vanquish their rivals. 

After the nsiuil few minutes of practice, the game began. Stout re- 
ceived the l>nl I on their goal line and carried it to the fifteen yard line. After 
several unsuccessful attempts to plow the stone wall of River Falls' 
defense, they were forced to punt. Receiving the ball River Falls started 
toward Stout's goal, hut were downed on the twenty-five yard line, from 
where they attempted a drop kick, which was incomplete, and the hall was 
recovered by Stout. After considerable criss-cross work on the part of 
both teams, tlie opponents suooeeded iu completing a forward puss and 
carried the ball across for a touchdown. Immediately they kicked goal. 
Returning the ball to the center of the field, it was again kicked to Stout. 
who succeeded by a number of good gains in earring it to the thirty yard 
line of t heir opponents, where t he whistle was sounded for the first quarter. 
Score, Stout o. River Falls ~. 

Beginning the second quarter Stout after a number of good line smashes 
succeeded In completing a forward pass for a good gain, only to lose t he ball 
on a fumble. River Falls was soon forced to punt, and Stout recovering 
the hall again advanced toward the goal, but time was short and was called 
for the first half before they could reach it. 

After a few- minutes rest ami a number of changes in the line-up on 
both sides, the teams again faced one another. Stout kicked to Kivcr 
Falls and downed them on their thirty yard line. After a number of un- 
successful attempts through Stout's defense they w ere forced to puilt. 
pushing th«- hall hack to Stout's thirty yard line, from which position 

Stout slowly returned it towards River Falls' goal. After a number of ex- 
changes of the hall, the third quarter ended with the hall ill StOUt's pos- 
sesion. Score, Stout 0, Kivcr Falls, "■ 

Fourth quarter opened with the hall in possession of Stout on their 

thirty-five yard line, from where with good gains they crowded toward the 

goal. Hut again they were to he disappointed, for through some means 

River Kails summoned strength and held them for downs. Obtaining 
the hull they soon placed it out of dangerous territory by punting. Stout. 

PfcgC On.-lli. •.:•!:.•:- 



in 1 ' sir J»r is' i ' ' Jim ;■ 



recovering, again advanced, bul although various plays were attempted, 
they were unsuccessful and the game ended with the final score 7 t<> <> in 
favor of River Falls. 

The game was hard fought and very interesting. The two teams were 
well matched En lighting spirit, both equally determined to be the victor. 
Si. mi i although penalized a great many times played a hard game and 
right!} deserved the cheer they received from the side lines. 

On October seventeenth, after a week of hard practice, the team again 
ventured forth i<> the Fair grounds, this time to meet the Minnesota 
Aggies. School Spirit was running high, consequently a large crowd had 
assembled to witness the coming conflict. Cheer after cheer greeted 
the Team as they trotted on tin- field, with heads erect and chests out, 
read] to fighl to e finish. And they fought, bu1 alas! Again they were 
forced to bite the dust. 

The game was a fierce battle, every inch gained by either side was fought 
for. Stout pushed the ball inch by inch toward the Gophers' goal*, only 
to have it returned toward their own by the Gophers. So hard were the 

teams fighting thai 1 1 1 « - yardage gained by one was b i lost through the 

gains of the other, and al the end of the first quarter neither could olaim 
the honors. The teams changed goals and the game continued in much 
the same manner as before until 1 1 1 « - Aggies succeeded in carrying the ball 

io Stout's one yard line. Bui here, being unable to i» tratc the stone 

wall Stout piled up in front of them, they losi 1 1 ■ • - ball on downs. Stout 
soon placed the hall in safe territory, but to no avail, for tin- Aggies managed 
before the half was over, bj the aid of a fakeplaj to cross the goal for a touch- 
down. Tin- Aggies failed to kick goal. The ball was returned to tin- renter 
of tin- fi.-ld ami kicked by Stout. Tin- Aggies received it ami carried it 
t.» the thirty-five yard line. A few more plays and die half was over. 
Score, Stout 0, Aggies '». 

The third proved to he a repetition of the first quarter. The fourth 

quarter started with the Aggies in possession of the hall on Stout's two yard 
line from where thej soon pushed it over for a touchdown. Near tho end of 
tin- quarter they were again near the goal, ami only after the third at- 
tempt did they surreed in pushing thru th<- wall between them and the 

goal line for their third and last tourhdown. Shortly after rami- the 

clad sound <»f ihe whistle calling the game to a close. Score, Stout <». 
Aggies 1!>. 

Tin- game was one of the finest ever played on the home gridiron, ami 

was featured by sportsman-like conduct on the part of both teams. The 

Aggies had an uniisunlh strong team, and it u;i, m> disijrare to Stout to 

he beaten by them. The Referee was one of the best in the Northwest 

and gave both tennis ;i gquarc deal. 

On October twenty-fourth, after a week of grilling practice the crippled 
team, cheered <>n bj a large bodj of Stout Hooters, met ami defeated La 
Crosse Normal i toe bj a score of 6 to '». in a game featured by thrilling 

plays, old style football, and an orrasionnl forward pass. Time after time 

l.n Crosse was unable to penetrate tin- line of Stout's defense ami was 

forced to punt in order to keep the hall out of dangerous territory. At 

..ne stage of the game the Normalites threatened t.. score by a succession 
of spectacular forward passes, hut the Blue and White Warriors soon solved 
the plaj ami intercepted the hall for Large gains. The Blue ami White 






i mil, ■ i ii 



backs made yard after yard thru the La Crosse defense, bj plowing 
thru the holes made by their team mates on the line. Toward the end of 
the hist quarter Stout's plays proved too much for tin- tired La Crosse 
team and they shoved the ball across for the only touchdown of the game. 
Si. .ui was m»t penalized once during the whole game, while La Crosse 
lost frequently thru offside playing. 

Tlu> large crowd that saw the game was wild with enthusiasm, and 
cheered their team on to victory thru the entire game. La Crosse was 
well represented in the rooting and cheered their fighting team i«» the 
last. The Stout eleven showed great Improvement over tl><- previous 
games, and displayed their appreciation of the encouragement given 
t hem by t he rooters. 

The last game at home was played, on the fifth of November* with 
Hamline. It was the hardest and i»->i game of the season. Both teams 
were <>iii for the honors of tl<<- da) and were well matched in fighting 
spirit. At the close of the first half neither had succeeded in scoring. 

During the third quarter, Efamline succeeded in carrying the ball across 
for a touchdown, by a succession «>f long runs. During the fourth quarter 
the l>;ill was almost constantly in Hamline's territory, but Stout was not 
strong enough to push it thru for a touchdown. Hamline's off side play- 
ing was frequently penalized. They failed repeatedly on forward passes; 
but made good gains on shift and spread formations. 

The game was one that will long !><• remembered by those who watched 
as well ashy those who took part In it . for the Team had succeeded in doing 
what Stout had never been able t<» <l<> before. Thai was t<» hold Hamline 
down to a small score. With so many of this year's team returning to 
build next year's team, Stout should !>«• able to defeat Hamline. 

On November twelfth the team journeyed to Stevens Point where they 
were defeated by the Stevens Point Normal team by a score of 12 to 0. 
Tli is score does not indicate t he relat ivc strength of 1 1 1 « - teams. The Stout 
Eleven did not show their usual form, and only occasionally did they 

show their old time s| d. The game was played on a field covered with 

from t hree to six inches of mud and w ator. The slow field caused t he team 
to rely on line plunges rather than to try their open shift plays that proved 

SO valuable in the ihimlim- •_miu<-. 

Now after the season i» over the question presents itself, was [f ,, suc- 
cessful one? To be sure it was. Although the team was able to win but 
one game, they did all that anyone could do their best. There is far 
more honor and success in playing the clean open game that Stout played 
and losing, than in playing one of the opposite kind and winning. It* the 
training received has taught the boys to be good losers, which it has, the 
season can !>«• hut one thing a success. 

In praising the work of the team, the work <»i* the Monogram men 
must not be overlooked or forgotten. They showed courage and spirit in 
staying by the team, and arraying themselves against the regulars in prac- 
tice receiving the knocks and humps along with the team. They did all 
this and more in order t<> help Stout have a stronger and bettor team, 
with but one reward in sight, a possible chance of playing part of some 
game. 



' u--llim<lri - '! 




ANDREW ANDERSON 

Quarter Back. (Senior. 

Ho camo to o» from Baa Clair* where he played ridht-half and 
full-back f«>r tin- West-Ends. 11. • played ■ hard oonaiatenf game, 
always read) and willing i«> <\<> lii- beat. 
Andy, although you were the smallest, you ware i««>i 1 1 »«■ least. 

PARKS L. BAILEY. 

Coaoh, Captain and Rifjht-half. Senior. 

Although havind three places to fill he wtm the man f«>r the j « » • > - 

\» Coaoh ■ ho was > helper to -"II .ilil»«-. 

\- Captain. ho knew i he tfame, and used hi* knowledge i<» » dnod 
;i<l\ an laffe. 

\- Right-half, when ii<- started with >!>•• ball ■• meant ■ move 
ahead, for he waa mire i<> liii the line tor ■< tfain. 
ParlcMi you aw ;• fimilmll maohlnc in yourself. 

RAYMOND M. BRADSHAW. 
Right End. Junior. 

A native «>f the Sun Flower state where I"' played with Topeka 
Elidh. Hi- was .1 hard tackier and il><- interference thai «<>i i>> 
iiim was • ■-. .in.- interferenoe." So mattor how hard 1 1 1 «• play, or 
ss here the '"ill went. limi! waa there, either in the midst or on top 
of i li<- scrim made. 
Brad, your position ^.i- woll filled. 



HERBERT F. PROGNER. 
Lefl End. Junior. 

Toad hopped on 1 1««- train at Rhinelander ( Wieoonsin. and landed 
in our midst with .■ rush, onlj to settle down to the routine of. the 
football field. Il<- played .i olean open dame, and 'li«! dood work 
in breakind up the plays <>f 1 1 1 «- opponents. 
Toad. «<• hope <•• hear from you attain. 






CARL J. HAGER. 

Tacklo and Flalf-back. Junior. 

Tin- "bhj man" of i he tram nmt from Jeffereon, Wieoonain, « here 
ha played on the Jefferwon Hi£h itquad. I !<• waa birf in t««. «nv-. 
in -i/.«- and football ability. 1 1 «- waa ;■ hard taekler and n aura 

Hton« Wall for interference l<i hit, 

-v.- look forward for etill bigger thing* next fall. 

HASSEL HALVERSON. 

Lefl Half. Senior. 

Ha drifted i<» ua from Sort h wood, North Dakota, where he (Sained 
Home experience in tbe football world. Hal wan always In the 
liiinn- heart and aoul. whethor on the side line or In the thick of 
the fight. 
Ilnl. although light, you liii the line low and hard. 

ALBIN J. GOLDBORG. 
( tuard. Sen tor. 

The left £uard know n to our opponen <- .<- *"i li«- lad with i In- dolden 
lock*." inn better known to n- .>- "Goldie," la .1 native of Hop- 
km*. M iiiio-ot .1. 11,. \,.., ; , tuard of no mean ability to hold or 
10 break up thinga alike. Man) playa that resulted In varda 
gained for the "Blue and White" were aenl through lii* ponition, 
Goldie. you will be miaaed next fall. 



RALPB PAGE. 

Center. Senior. 



1*. 1 . who held « I » «- pivot poaition muii~i.ni. .1. oame from the 

Nfankato Illtfh Sal I aquad. lie ^.i- th >i> unbreakable part 

of the football machine, playing ever) minute of the aeaaon. 
Hie paaelnd waa axoellent and Wf defemrive work i 1 1>. >\. •• criticism. 
Page, von broke up many ■ play. 




ORPHIE E. SAXHAUG. 

Full Back and Guard. Junior. 

Saxhaujf'e experience sained «itli the Fertfua Falki llltfh Bohool 
■quad wu .1 great help to the team. No matter what powition 
he played) i"- alvraya <ii«l 1 • ■ -^ beat. 
Saxhautf, whal ;ir«- jrou tfointf to <l<» next year? 

HENRY A. SCHOTT. 
Full Back. Junior. 

BM Sohott'n football ability and hid 'ill around good work won 
for liim ■ name amonij tin- Football Boya. Under l>i- leaderahlp 
and «iili the material ;ii hand< Stout should have ;• winning team 
nasi f«ll. 

Bbf Sohott, you have tin- knowledge and the material, let** mulct- 
t_- ■ • • • « I . 

JOHN \\ . WHITE. 
Taoklc. Senior. 

Percy r ived I « «— football training with the 1913-14 squad. 1 1 . - 

».i> -iroiiii ni breaking up inteiferenoe ■> i >< l ;■ deadl> tackier. II' 1 

waa rijjlu there all the time and foutfht hard for the Blue and 

White. 

!'. ■■-< ■. , goal poata -ir<- harder than your head and all towera do not 

have elooka. 

EMAN WIGGENS. 
Guard. Junior. 

Although not ohoaen for the tir-t dame hi- atick-to-itive-neai iron 

for him ft i>iii< i ili< team, where he lived up to the expeota- 

i iona of i he < !oaoh. 

\\ 'i'.-L'C'ii>, you ehould prove a valuable man next year. 



Pace Onc-Hun<!r»il-Fourt*«n 




The SasiksS Sail Ssasom 



SOON after 1 1 1 • - Stevens Point football fame, oamc the <;ill for Basket 
Boll volunteers. The prospects were not very food. Only one **S" 
man remained, around which t«> build the team thai was i«» defend Stout's 
previous record. The boys went i<> work with ;■ will, and under tin- leader- 
ship of Captain Elahn and Coach Schotl passed thru many a hard practice. 
The rigorous practice proving ;i fair tryout, the besl were retained for the 
first team while tin- others fell into teams according to their merits. 

A further tryout came Saturday evening, December twelfth, in ;■ fame 
with Elk Mound. All the men who were ;it ;ill promising were given ;i 
chance in this game. Although the score was •".'•• t<> s in Stout's favor, 
lack of systematic team work was noticeable. The game showed thai 
Stout had ;i coming team, bu1 thai better team work was necessary. 

The opening battle of the- regular scheduled games were fought in the 
Stout Armory Friday evening, January eighth, with Stevens Poinl Normal. 
When the smoke and noise <>t" the conflict cleared away, the score board 
showed 34 to l'» in favor of Stout. Both teams played well and the fame 
was fast and interesting. Much the same style <>t" play was followed by 
the two teams. The centers of both teams proved t<» be the chief scorers. 
11. A. Schotl proved to be Stout's most successful man. securing 1" oul 
of the 16 baskets made by Stout. The remaining points were made by 
Ilahn. French and Sievera. 

In ;i clean, well played fame Stout defeated the River Falls Normal 
T<-am on their own floor by a score of 27 to 21. The fame waa played 
Friday night, January sixteenth. The Si out fuardsdid food work. Hager 




and J. ('■• Sohott made three !>;iski-ts each, M. A. Sohott two-, the remain- 
ing points '.<inL: scored by Hnlm who starred in making long shots. 

On the following evening the Team made their trip a complete success 
by defeating the Minnesota Aggies, on their floor to the tune <>f 3] to II. 
.1. G. Si-hott who found the ring four times in the first half and >i\ times 
in the second half, making a big hit with the crowd. The guarding of 
Siou! was excellent and the team work good. French, Bahn, Bager, and 
II. Si- 1 10 1 1 were the other members of the "quint" who »<> well represented 

StOUt thai (light. 

At St. Paul, Friday , January twenty-second, Stout met her fiixt defeat 
before the fast Bamline team. It was Stout's off night and tin- team was 
unable to find themselves on their opponents' floor. None of the players 
were up to their regular form; Bahn making but four out ol ten free throws. 
Stout played a clean game thru-out, onlj four fouls being i-.-illi-il on them 
while ten were called on their opponents. Score 11 to 12. 

Journeying to La Crosse tin- following night the team met the La Crosse 
Normal team and were again defeated. Stout was able to ti<- the score in 
each half, and each time it looked liki- the game belonged to them. Bow- 
ever, on account of the hard game the night before they were not strong 
enough to hold Ln Crosse, and in the bitter period she rallied and out- 
played them. Score 26 to 35. 

Friday evening, February twelfth, the Minnesota Aggies proved easy, 
going down before the team by a score of 31 to 12. A good share of the 
honor of the \ ictory belongs to the guards, French and Bager. The quality 
of t heir w ork is shown by t he fact t hat neit her of t he Aggie forwards scored. 
The Aggies had hard luck in making baskets, while Stout had good con- 
trol and found the basket with ease. 

This was Bahn's hist game before leaving for Ironwood, Michigan, to 
teach. After Ute game he was presented with his letter. 

On Saturday night, February twentieth Stout lost a second time to 
Bamline. The game was slow, on account of the many fouls called. Three 
persona] fouls were called on Stout againsl seven on Bamline. J. CI. 
Schotl starred for Stout and B. Silu.it made a good showing against Blume. 

In a fast, dean game in the Stout Armory, Saturday, February twenty- 
eighth, the team was defeated by the Ascensions of Minneapolis. J. G. 
Schotl i-;i^i-il six out of the seven baskets credited to the toam. Score, 
Stout 19, Ascension 26. 

On March fifth, in a fast hard fought game the team was defeated by 
tin- Monitor team 23 to II. The one sided score by no means indicates 
tiie kind of game that was played. Moth teams were out for the honors. 
nn<l thcj both played a hard fast game. Although the Stout team played 
their best, they could not outdo the lucky basket throwing of their op- 
ponen is. 

<>n the following evening the team defeated the Dunn County School 
of Agriculture bj a score of 52 i<> it;. The A gg ies played good ball, but 
could not withstand the finished team work of Stout. 



Onc-MuncJrcil 




CLAUDE M. FRENCH. 
Guard 



Claude played ;■ tfood consistent tfamo. lit- was n millstone >>t< 
lii~ opponent** neok, and one of such -'/.•■ that it waa rather «li^'- 
flcult to shake him off. Ha played with 1 1 ««- team and for the 
beam. 1 1«- exhibited n eool head and often managed to alip down 
the Floor and rind a basket. I !«• !«-ii\<-« ua i hi- • • 



HERBERT FROGNER. 
Guard sub. 



\s hen ealled on to play l<«- put up an excellent game, h,. ,i;,i ^,,,,,1 
work on il<-f<-ii-«- and waa fortunate in shooting baskets. Il<- re- 
maina to help build next jreur'a team. 



ALLAN IIAIIN. 
Captain and Forward. 

Allen waa a veteran of 1913-13 team. On tli«- floor 
fn»i dame. He could beaeen ;ii any pari of the floor al anj 1 1 n 
running a Ion it, suddenly disappearing, only to • om be- 
tween —«»■■> >••"■> legs with the hull »«ill in hb poa a c i adon. Il<- 

quick and accurate bosket ahoc 



CARL C. HAGER. 
Running Guard. 

nude's running-mute nnd made many of il>< % pointa 
that were registered on tin Jtout'a lodger. Ha 

always man I back to 1 » i — man l" time to prevent him 

from shooting or to break ap ji play. * '. i r l remaina i<> form part 
«>f naxl year's I • 



1'aur One-llu:: 




EARL 1$. MATCH. 
Forward. 



Mniii-li atopped in and filled Hahn'a place liko mi old lima player. 

Hi- team work wai ii I. Although ho «ji- nol quite no oonaiiM 

lenl in ahooting baaketa aa aoma of the other*! in- made •■ ifnod 
manj pointa for the team. Nfauoh will !><• with the team an« 
..i her \ ear. 



II. A. SCHOTT. 
Center. 



II. \. «;i» the bearini] on which our loam ran. Ho waa in the 
funi .-ill the time. Hi- team work and I m— k <■ i nhootiw] were 
eapeoially tfood. lie will In- here next year i«» fill lii- place on ■ 
a in ii ina team. 



.1. (i. SCHOTT 

( louoh and Forw ard. 



.1. (J. filled lii- poaitiona in -i manner that would do anyone oredil . 
Hi- li.nl ii keen eye for the beaketi and raocoedod in rintfind Kovernl 
each £amo. Although ho played *■ forward poaltion he did tfood 
work at defenae. J. <i. will fill the office of captain on next yeor'n 
team 



THOMAS STEVERS. 

Center sub.) 

Siovera when called upon, played n clean fii-i tfame. He waa 
after the imll nil the time. If he received ii when ha v».i« near 
the baaket, ii was rare to find • ■ roatind place therein. Slovera 

li-.iv ■- I Ii i- \ i-.ii . 



Pace One-Hundred-Eightccn 



•£^2 Sail 

SHORTLY after the closing of Basket Ball season, li;i><- Ball season 
opened. Thirty fellows signified their intentions of trying oul for the 
team, bj reporting ;>t ;< Base Ball meeting held In tin- Gym. Among tli«' 
number were found two **S" men, Belle and Kelton, several seniors who 
tried oul last year, and 1 1 1 « - remainder Juniors. Belk was elected captain, 
and Kelton was elected t.. coach. Under tho leadership ol these two, and 
with the materia] ;>« hand, we should build the best team Stout has had. 

Five pairs of batteries were found among the candidates, while tho rest 
were scattered about evenlj among « I • « - various positions. The batteries 
were set to work in the Armory, getting their arms In shape for tli«- hard 
out-door work 1 1 1 ^ ■ t was to comes >. The first few aightsof these work- 
outs, it was rather dangerous for a visitor t«» pop his head up thru the stair- 
way, without first reoonnoitering to see if 1 1 » « - coast was clear, for balls 
flew here and there, sometimes where thej were directed, but nu.n-.ift.-n 
not. The balance ol the candidates had •<» content themselves with the 
hope 1 1 « < • out-door practice would begin ;"- soon ;>* tl>«- weather would 
permit. 

Thus far t!><- schedule of games has not been completed. It i» the hope 
of our Manager, Mr. O. C. Haaoh to arrange games witli tho citj teams as 
well ;i> several school teams. 

\\.- have hopes <>i" making this tli<- most successful !$;is«- IJ;ill year Stout 
has ever known. We have as good material from which to build this year's 
team as in any previous year. With ;i little hard work on the part <>i" tli«- 
hoys, and ;i >pirit of co-operation on the part of the Studont Body, there 
i-. no reason why we cannot succeed in doing so. 





HOMKMAKERS' l)i HtM I'K >KY 




i)u. Harvey s Home 




Tin: Memorial 










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id — 







MARJORIE siMK 




(il.AUVS DICK 


l'i .— iilini 




Vice President 


CAROL WILLIAMS 




DORIS AMERPOHL 


Secretary 




Trcaaurer 


jiiti 


Hsms-rtes 


VERB MURRAY 




GLADYS WINEGAR 


Prenidcn i 




Vice President 


M iRTHA IIKINKU 




LLORA MoQBE 


Secretary 




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X W, C, A, 



r I "MIK Y. W. ( ". A. was ontirelj reorganized at Stout in November of the 

■*■ present term. Late in beginning) \\«- have had to work doubly hard in 

order i" accomplish at 1 • - . • — t .1 pari oi 1 1 1 « - aims thai we ><-t for ourselves. 

Our firsl meeting was a social < and since then w <• have tried to develop 

our social and religious views, thereby bringing balance into our lives. 

Our meetings have been li«-l<l every two weeks and ul these we have sung 
the <>l«l hymns beloved bj our grand-parents until we too, arc beginning 
to feel familiar with them. We have all taken pari In discussing problems 
of practical religion, and have been led in talks on missionary subjects of 
interest i<> all. Thru the kindness of the school authorities, wo have been 
provided with a special bulletin board on which t«> announce our meet- 
ings. 

Our first large -*<>< i.tl function, a "Children's party*" was given for the 
Seniors graduating in January. Have you ever thought what a difference 
a child's dress and long curls might make in the appearance of a girl who 
usuall) wears stripes and i-> nearlj always hidden behind a pil«- <•!" boxes 
and books? Of course you have! We became acquainted with each other 
;i- we are oul of school and <li\i<lt-<l our recess lunch in true school girl 
fashion. Our other social event was •■ tea, t«» which all Stout girls, the 
faoultj and patronesses were invited. We came away with a feeling that 
we were really a rather important pari «>f Menomonie and that much 
might be accomplished through co-operation. Much smaller, but very 
important t«> us have been t !>«• social gatherings at the close of some "f our 
meetings. We are now looking forward t « » a "Geneva*' party for those 
who might !»• interested in attending the conference, and i<> a big picnic 

at I lie Point. 

We are about to elect our new cabinet for 1915-16 and we hope they 
will !»<• able to realize the desires and the ambitions of the Association. 
Willi the help of Miss Pearson, our Student Secretary in this field; and the 
interest and co-operation of the Facult) : together with the loyal tj of ever) 
Stout girl, we feel thej have everj reason for success. 



a 3*14-1 £5 r J- 



Mt 



FLOl BENNETT, Chairman of Religious Committee, 

MILDRED SMITH. Chairman of Membership Committee, 

MARGARET SCHLIGHTER, Chairman of Social Committee, 
JEANNE DAANE, Chairman of Pinance Committee. 



A. WEBB BROWN 
Director 




ij-'ioni '1: 

OOBNBTS 

.\l\ in Sohavfer 
Of i.. H.1.1-. . 
Kni.'-i Knutaon 

CLARINETS 

R, Bradahaw 
.1. Ritter 

.1. SteandaM 

BARITONE 

.1. Prlak 

TROMBONE 

K. Prj kliiiul 
s. Kalaon 

ALTO 



JOHN <>. 8TEENDAHL 
Director 



VIOLINS 

\\ . l hirbahn 
\\ . \\ leheraki 
s. Nelson 
If. Mclntonh 
Mi»~ Y, PJnaull 
N! i— . I.. Taaahe 
Mi— M. Smitli 

CORNETS 

K. Knutaon 
Aa Sohaefer 

TROMBONE 

K. Prj kland 

< LARINET 

\. \\ . III.. XV ,, 



s. Sohaefei 


K. Bradnhaw 


K. S;uwlvi_. 

J. Blaokman 


SAXAPHONE 


TUBA 


II. II.ilv.r~on 


s. Spratfue 


CELLO 


SNARE DRUM 


B. Slum.. 


C. Prenoh 


1 I.I TK 


M. Liddy 


.1. Priak 


BASS DRUM 


DRUMS 


II. ( irockef i 
8AXAPHONE 


C M. French 


PIANO 


li. Halveraon 


W. Bitfelow 




Past? Onc.Hundnil-Twcrr 



i/iou-i: Musical Oircjsmlsaiiosiss 

npilK Stout Musical Societ) vn;i- organized for tho term 1913-1014, with 
-*■ .1. ( >. Stoendahl :>s President, A. ('. Sehaefer ;i*. Vice President, A. \\*. 
Brown as Secretary and Treasurer, and W. iV'errel ;i*« Business Manager. 
This organization was continued thru out the year and much of the mic- 
< «-^«. of the Musical enterprises of the Stout Institute can !><• traced back 
i<> the efforts of it* members and officers. 

The organization was continued tor the term 1911-15, new officers 
having been elected ;it ;i meeting held for that purpose earl) in ih«- t* bool 
year. A. Webb Brown wan chosen ;i> President for 1 1 » « - second year of its 
existence, having ;i* hi* ussistants, A. (". Sehaefer ;■> Vice President, W. 
Durbahn ;i* Secretary, and II. Halverson as Business Manager. The 
purpose of 1 1 » ■ — organization was the promotion of Musical Organizations 
within the Institute. 1I<>\\ well they have carried out ilii» purpose ran l>«- 
readily seen in the work of both iIh-Si.mii Band and the Stout Orchestra. 

The Stout Band was organized earl) in September under the director- 
ship of A. \\ . Brown. About thirt) of * I * * - students responded t<> the call 
for members and after rehearsing conscicntiousl) for some time, made their 
first appearance ;it one of our foot-ball games. Since then Lhcj have 
appeared at man) foot-ball, basket-ball and other athletic games, and 
have won a liiL-li place in the hearts <»f the Faculty and Student Bod) of 
tin* Institute. 

The Si out Orchestra did not ii«'i under way until late in the year, ■■winy 
>«» the inability of tin- students to attend rehearsals. A. C. Sehaefer was 
elected director but later resigned in favor of Mr. Steendahl. The Or- 
chestra has appeared .it Assemblies, basket-ball games, dances and on 
many other occasions, delighting ;it ;■'! times ever) one who chanced to 
hear them. Much of tl><- success of 1 1 1 i — Organization lies in tli<- hearty 
co-operation of the student body. 




THE Stori Dmumitoki 




Oifilesys ol Sjioni Ms&lsal iiocieiy 



\. WEBB BROWN 

i'l.-i.i.ni 



\\. DURBAHN 
Secretary and Treasurer 



A. <•- sell AKFKH 
V'ioe President 



II. HALVERSON 

liiiHiiii'->M Miiii.iiii-r 



I'aicc Onc-llmuli 



f. • inn i 




S\9 

H-rafej 






D*i£i£S?3 oi £ 



W. M. BIGELOW 



BAXHAUG 

\'i<-<- ProMidpiil 



II. K. .1 ICKSON 

.iry 



J. K. GILBERT 

- uri-r 






oy$ J &lea CJltTJb 




* I 'WO years have passed since our [nstitute last had a (i!<-<- Club. This 
* year the boys decided tlcii there were too manj "songsters" in their 
midst who were not given opportunit) to shot* their ability. Ii was not 
until tln % second semester that a few had enough initiative i<> organize and 
appear before Assembly one bright Wednesday afternoon. From thai 
afternoon the Glee Club spirit steadily grew to that of a successful organ- 
ization. After their first appearance the hoys decided to put tin- club 
upon a firm basis by electing off icers and tin- following were elected: N\ . M. 
Bigelow . President : t >. E. Saxhaug, Vice President : II. E. Jackson, Secretary : 
and .1. E. Gilbert, Treasurer. 

Finding it difficult to work under student leadership, the hoys un« 
animously voted Miss Orris as their director providing she «;is willing to 
take charge and this >li«- very kindly consented t<> do. Mr. Gilbert has 
presided at tin- piano verj faithfully and tin- boys all feel grateful for the 
hop ices <»f both M i>» < hris and M r. ( lilbert . 

With imc practice a week the olub has labored faithfully and have 
succeeded in working up several selections and also some short catchy 
encores t<> render at Assemblj Meetings. We believe that tin- boys have 
made more than a good beginning for this year and that they will carry on 
th«- work further. Considering our late start and tin- fact that there was 
no foundation from last year t<> work upon, tin- club has been very suc- 
cessful t his fur. 

A Glee ("lni> i" a school has oxactlj tin- same prestige in it>- line of work 
as has athletics. An active organization such as this club by appearing 
before the student bod} gain poise and also create a desire tor more ex* 
tensive work. Their success does not altogether depend upon tin* school 
but mostly upon tin- attitude of the hoys themselves. It has been proved 
that Glee Club material is available at Stout. Why not huild it up in place 
of discouraging it'.' A hearty co-operation upon tin- part of the student 
body at Assembly Meetings is fully appreciated by the boys. We hope to 
do a better work at Stout next year and if possible make plans for a spring 
trip. We need your support! 



Pbir^oiiiibl O'l Iha Club 
First Tenor 



W. M. Bigelow R. Mcintosh 
M. I.. I.iddy R. M. Bradshaw 

A. ('. Schaefer 



Second Tenor 

R. I.. Hugelen E. I). Mauch 
II. K. Jackson B. N. Koons 
A. C. Liddy 



FIRST Bass 

.1. G, Schott S. E. Nelson 

(>. E. Saxhaug .1. W. Dookar 
A. .1. Goldborg R. M. Post 



Second Bass 

II. T. Kelson II. A. Sohott 

W. II. Lunder II. G. Clark* 

W. M. Krinkmaun 



M las < >rris 

I >.i .-. !..r 



.1. Kdw aid ( iilbert . 

Aooompanlnl 



•nolliindrcd-Thirty-Two 




Jill 



vxs 01 ZlouZ Slrls' mksTS CiiAb 



MYRTLE CAVES 
Prtmidcn t 



MVKA JUNKS 
S.-<-r«-ljir> 



HAZEL LaSHEIXE 

Tri-ii-.il riT 



JioM 



K«.t her ( irixnstad 
Lcona Stutztnan 
Hannah <)«'<-k 
Marl ha Heiner 
Jeanet !<• McMastcra 
Hull. Kick 
Bather Heller 
Gladys Gondie 

I\;il liryn McHeni*} 

( i -_}i;i I.. ( iramer 

Mar£are1 Weixner 



M> II I.' ( ;i\.-« 

Vere M urray 
Agnes McHenry 
Alice Pinneo 
Anne II;. II 

I. lorn M;i( iee 

Florence Amundsen 
( ihttk - Paulson 
Erna K. Mauror 
Sara < ioldberg' 
Hazel LaShcllc 



Lillie Olsen 
Kut li Johnson 
Irniii Rice 
Marjorie Sintes 
Mabel Sneen 
M. Bernice Bell 
Mar£are1 Teele 
( trace Preeland 
Floret Zuchlkc 
Eleanor I lo^an 
Myra Jones 



!ii.lr.-.!-Thirt>-Thrc* 




>nc-Hund red-Thin 



&tvrut Sirls 3 -mktsxa Club 

Sl'RKLY every o leant oudhl lu be interested In oul of dooi sports: but nol un- 

til tin- rfu wh there iniy definite action token amond the l)omi - • •«■ Student* 

of The Stoat Institute. Karly in Ihe fall • >( 1911. Miss Kraui icetind of all 

the i;iil» who were interested in .1 Hikers' Club. There wan ;> lard* attendance and • 
one waa enthusiastic over the thoudht <>i ;i true oul "f doors reoreation: a recreation where 
.:• Inhale th< _....<! Invidoratind out aide air. appreciate nature in it- r«-jiliNii<- form. 
a- w •■ 1 1 wm t<> enjoj i> few core free hours with nil mental drain In it I aside. 

Immediatel) •> club called "The Girl Hikers" was ordunixed, ■ * constitution drawn up 
mid the following offioeni were elected: Myrtle Cave*. President: Myrn JonoH, Secretary: 
and Hasel La Shelle. Treasurer. I«atar. Marjorie Simes was chosen an captain and Bern ice 
Bell '■- Chairman ■■:' Social Event*. 

The f ii »i liik-- taken wan :■■ Irvinaton, .■ distance of seven miles. Oui club was well repre- 
sented a i' li an attendance ol Ihlrt) ■ members. Juddind from the happj faces, dusts of 

luudhtcr and rfeneral enthusiasm, ii was sural) enjoyed b) ail. 

The nexl 1 1 ■ U •- \n.i~ to Rusk, a distance >>i twelve miles, which moal «>f il»- dlrls made In 
three houra. We mual oonfess thai ■ feu <<f the members on the las! lap of their joumej 
found ii more convenient i«> ride. IJm they oouldn'l fool the Seen ty snd their m '• 
waa deducted aeeordindly. 

Thai 1 !><• hikes should be Ion iter seemed i<> be 1 1»«- prevailing idea, so we next walked 
to within ;i mile •>'" Cedar Kails. Some •>!" » I •«- will- wan nol quite satisfied and journeyed 
on up !<■ see il"- sidhta <>f «!<«• villafte. The) were quite favorably im pr e ssed and •>"> r*turn« 
bid -... in teres ted the real of us thai «><>r nexl liiU.- waa taken ■«• ii"' Palls. 

Then came winter with it- drifts. Inter Its slush, and hikind for <>- was nol permitted. 

Some of us have ventured .1- far as Irvindton tl>i« sprind. bul found trampind rathei 
difficult. We hope thai soon il"- weather and roads will perm i I us lo continue <»nr hikes, 
»«. thai each one* by the <•'■■' of tin- school year «ill have made har one hundred miles and, 
aa 11 reward receive ■ Stoul monodram. 

1 1 Is ourdosire lhal "The ( iirl Hikers" continue loexisl and iifior<l to it- future Don • 
Science members as much pleasure .1- ii has lo us. 



S-ion-l '&oys* l£Mks*s dub 



IN 1912, an ordanixallon havind '>■> athlal < aapeet. waa Introduced into il><- [nstitule. Ii 
waa named i!>«- Stout Rikers Club ii< ■• with it- functions. Mthoudh the 

membership at lhal lime was onlj fifteen ii wa* recognised aa one of the leadind olubs 
.if 1 he I ■ > — 1 i 1 wi ion. 

In 1913 tli«- Hikers Club enjoyed ■> dreater success, the membership Increasind lo thirty. 
Tin- functions were more extensive, nuch .i» crenl ind a more enthusiastic school spirit, help- 
ind in .11 hlet ios and in other waya loo numerous to mention, boostind the Institution and it- 
lu 1 poses. 

At present wc ace the club atronder than In pro (ous ream and of • > more permi it na- 

\ll records for mileade have I > broken, and the membership havind been increased 

aboul twent) fellows. Ilik>-- have I n taken t" Eau Claire, Knapp, Ccdai Kails, Weston, 

Hudson and St. Paul. Plana are belnd made f'>r a lond liik.- late « t » « — sprind. Ihe dlatanoa t-- 
be one hundred miles <>r thereabouts. 

It i- the earneal « a — l • of all w li<> now belond thai the club will continue to aueoeed and 

■a ii has in the post and thai lhe**Hlkera' " monodram s ill continue lo aland for sal I 

apiril and physical development. 




S-lo-Si'l 'Boy-? ^£ika'J*£j Ciiib 



E. u. KNITSON 


p. W. \ <>»s 


IV.-i.l.-iw 


Vice Premdonl 


\ ( BCHAEFER 


( w . HYDE 


Secretary 


TrwMU i or 



Hon 



C. F. Belk 


A. Ericson 


1." 


Benjamin 


B. Mcintosh 


C. Hyde 


(. 


Sk<»csn»;iik 


A. Kil.ri 


A. Schnefcr 


i:. 


I I«»«-lni 


Ci. Pepin 


II. Clarke 


(. 


Jester 


J. l»ri>k 


\\\ Bike 


I - . 


\ <lss 


A. Bum 


H. Hugelen 


B. 


Kmi tson 


II. Crocket! 


( ;. Si iM-i-u aid 


W 


Wichoraki 


■■■■■^^■■■■■■■■i 


mtmmmm^mmmmmmmmMmmm 








Young Mmi'z Ciirls-teQ iijjo 



MAI KICK J. Ml » •"- 
Vie* Presidi 



IIARVBY NELSON 

President 



II. W. GOSSETT 
Secretary and Treasurei 



THERE in just ono word which oan justly typifj Stout Institute "- she stands today. 
Tin- word i- "forward." Stout Institute i- moving forward this peat In ;■ «•>» thai 

ought i" int< .-i mr) pound man who contemplates takind ■ Manual \rt* no 
Stoul Institute stands '■■•■ -In- fosters only thai which in conducive toward mon 

worthj achievement on il>-' pari <•< those who oonu here for their education. One «>f the 
■bora mentioned forward steps which Stoul Institute has taken ill- year i- tin- or don I 

..f ji ^ . M. < . \. within iIk- niuil. in body. Heretofore, there haw I < no attempf made bj 

tin- school <>r atudenta to foeter and stimulate a moral end religious atmosphere thin 
important i»lm-.«- of .1 future child leader's nature « ••- entruated to the oare and duirl 
of the various »itli whiah the inoomind students allied themselves. In man) 

eaaea 1 In- worked s ''II ; in <>i ln-r ••;i«>-«. it did not. Student* tindlnd no church of 1 heir choice 
were heaitanl about meetind with another denomination. The unanimous opinion war. 
that ■ ' there could be organised ;i sooJet) or aaaoolation. the membendiip to which would be 

open 10 Catholic and Pro tea tan I ;ilik<-. to member* ol • de nination as well ;■- another 

.1 fon 1 11 o>n Itaai*, ':■■> othei worda, through and by which on.- atudenl midhl meel hi* fellow 
.in. 1 reoeive help and enoouraiiement throudh the exchange of Chriatian fellbwahip the 
verdict of 1 1 • In t erected waa thai auoh an organisation wool. I 1.. immensl) worth while. 

A- ■ result we have, ■>- previously mentioned. << "V" in Stoul Institute. Tin- purpose 
of this organisation is: first, to create a spirit of fraternilj amondsl the students; to deveh :■ 
men to Christian leadership 1 and third, to develop » man's social nature. 

We believe thoroughly in the all around developed man. Mind muscles and ■• 
.ir. great factors in shaping the destin) not onlj «>( id..-.- men who coma under the Influeno 
of 11 Christian organisation here al Stout inn also I he man) yound lives with whom the) 
will oomo in dose contact later as teachers, supervisors, and leaders in the various .-0111. 
munltlea Into which the) are called. Stoul Institute has admlrabl) cared for the develop- 
ment of mind .iii. I muscles in the past w« believe thai she will succeed squall) ;■- well in 
iln- development ol ■ > higher and oleanei moral I i f «- of her studenta. 

Thusiar the" Y" activities have I 1 of a distinctly religious nature. Meetings have been 

held every Sunday morning at eight-thirt) o'clock. Theseservice* have been led b> teacher* 

and -in. I. ni- alike 1 many helpful momenta have been spent in song, talks, and pn 

\- iln- organisation -^row- ii will ..•" course ink.- on man) aolivitios not now attempted. 

We believe that an organisation such .1- ilii- i- ver) much worth while: however, if ii i- 

doind to drow 1.. oooup) the place ii fustl) deserves, there must bo ■■ heart) ■ peratio 

iln- pari of nil Interested. We solicit the kindly in ter e s t «>f .ill former studenta <>f S 

we depend upon future students to carr) 1 Iii- w or k on to dreater success than ws at this time 

dare an 1 ioipato. 

"A bidder and better Stoul 



>iir-liiin<lrn|-TI>ir 




^itiiii Dance Co'M'isil't&zis 

II. \v. JIMMBRSON FLORENCE ZBIDLER II. W. GOS8BT1 

( !hairmnn Beoretarj Treamirer 

<>, < . M aitiik GRACE DOW l. i:\na BAKER 

Dtinoe Cennoi I'm nits Representative Knoulty Represents tit 



:i<lr«l-Tliit! 



S'iotij: IDsmes Comsmtizz 



In i in- early pari >•( the iwhool year ii became evident to thorn in aut hority that, because 
.if ilif ban placed i>> our President npon attending public danoea a and naind the modern 
dances, together with « l •«- demand on the pari of the atudcnl body for dancing, i< would !><• 
necessary thai mdm ayatcm whereb) dances oould be tflvon undo* faculty miperviaion ;• ■ • < I 
faculty and atudent manaiiementi be devised. 

Aa ■ reaultt the Btoul Dance Committee was organised. Thia committee had foi it- 
purpoaei the furnishing of meana of reoreation i<> thoee who were intereeted ii> dancing, to 

i.i iii:- together i pie who otherwuw would nol have an opportunitj ol becoming acquainted, 

and alao furnish financial -• •< I i>> one or nil <if i he aohool organixntione in need of i he eame. 

A i ii mooting of 1 1 • « - atudent body ii wan decided to place :1k- appointment of ilii- oom> 
mittee in the hands of the Athletic I tun:. I. which body dul) appointed Mr. II. W, Jim meisoni 
Mi. Mauthe. Mrs. Dow and Miaa Baker to represent 1 1 ■•■ faculty! and Miaa Florence Zeidler 
and Mr. II. W, Goose 1 1 to reproasnl the atudent body. At iIh- aame meeting the etudenl 
bod) also decided to turn all the monetary Murplua over i«> 1 1 ««• Athletic Aaaociation and ii> 
hare Mr. Mauthe nol ae Censor of Dancee and Dancing. 

The Dance Committee mel before each dance and arranged for the dato, hall, music and 
other dotaila for I he evening'a pleasure. As often ns wan deemed feasible, dances were tfiven, 
either al the Armory or the Gymnasium, under the direct management and aupervlsion of 
the l '■• nee I lorn ">i I tee. 

Besides furnishing ■ meana of reoreation and increasing the activities of ili<- eohool life a 
the ooiumittee turned ovei to il»- Vthletic Vasociation approximately one hundred dollare. 
.i- well as financing the entertainments. For *!»»-» recreation and financial aid the atudent 
body are indebted to the membera of the dance committee who worked earnestly and faith' 
fully tli.it othem mighl enjoy themselves. 



£i out Diiiiiii Club 




Iticolow Snxlimiu Soivrr* Koon* Knulio llippakka 
Guderian — Hamilton — Carlson — IIuu-i'Iimi — Kochlor — Durbahn. 



•nc-Hundrcd-Forty 




£JtU£isiii Council 



M IURICE .1. SKI-SON. Sr. 
< Ihairman 

J. s. PRI8K 
Junior Member 

FRED W, QR08ST1 < !K 
Senior Member 



HOMKR L. sian ton. Jr. 

S-.itr.m 

ROBERT I). MelNTOSB 
Junior Member 

WALLACE COMBTOCK 

Senior Member 



HARVEY T. KELSON 

Senior Mi'iiiImt 



Page One-H indred-Forty-0 

■ ■»: ■!■ :■: nil Jinn illll 'Mil 



' Ill if HI 111 :llll! 



x l y he Htnils'M Council 



DURING the school year 1913*14 on organization was formed i<> assume, 
to ;i certain degree, some of 1 1 1 « - responsibilities of the student govern- 
ment and was known as tl>'- Student Council. The Council was made up 
<»!' seven men, representative of the Manual Training department! in 
which the responsibilities of governing were vested. In this way ;■ closer 
relation between students and faculty was established and ;> keener inter- 
est in student affairs was created within ili«- student body. 

Willi the beginning of 1 1 1 « - school year which is about to close, the 
Council was called in consultation with Doctor Harvey, ;>' which linn- 
tin- merits and tin- shortcomings of the previous year's work were dis- 
cussed, that the new organization might l><> of greater and better service 
in the coming year. The plan and purpose «>i* the Council was then laid 
before the Juniors who elected their representatives i<> - ■ i « i the Senior 
members in i li<- u ork. 

Regular meetings have been held each month ;>t which time problems 
concerning 1 1 * • • welfare of 1 1 » < - students and of tin- school in general were 
discussed and acted upon. Much credit is due tin- members of the Council 
for the manner in which thoj have acquitted themselves in all matters 
which have been presented i<> them. 




i.vsuiKH) Ham. 



Pane One-Hundred 













w 











CoauBttteM 



Kxorutivc Committee 



■ man 
H 
Tre-a»«r«-r 



. . AOS'KS M-< \IMin 

HAROLD GRIF1 i m 

. LARENCR BKI.K 



Reception Committ 

tl.i.irmn.. JKANNr DAANH 

Refreshment < Sommittee 

IOSKIMIINK MM M.I.KK 

Musks Committee 

... HAROLD OILMAN 



i. mi Committee 
,....,■ MAIN BCIl 

Decoration Committee 

Clm.rmun . . . ROTH CHICKBRIXG 

Drayage Committee 

Chairman .... CLARSNGI BBLK 



ii^ITII what joj and «lflii»ln the Juniora anticipated tl>«- Senior Prom! 
▼» Bach rear the Qanloie entertain tin* m**» Junior «ln*». ■*• ilmi both 
. laaaai maj meet unci ritjoy .1 imVumiiii iwmnrf together in entartainmant 
and m.ikiii ii ne*» friends and acquaintances 

Thia rear tha Annual Benior Prom wrae mora attractive than ever. 
The Lnritationa smi i»> kite Beniors inrltin^ ;i11 ,o sttand tha Prom on 
Kovember !"«• twentieth. The Company II Armor> ^.i- •<- unim! tin* 
fain -land where nil mat for the festal dance. 

The hall had bean entirety transformed. Those of «>- who had never 
bean inside the Armory before could hardly realiie that tl««- plar<* vwr 
looked different than the bright snd beautiful l>nll room wa beheld. The 



Pa** Onr-llutvlrnM-'ort'. 



walls and ceiling were entirelj covered with erepc paper and the effect 
was charming. Rainbow colors were used and the rainbow scheme was 
carried out to the most minute detail. Miss Hut li Chickering was in charge 
of tin- decoration committee and the efforts put forth by her aquad were 
duly rewarded by the results. Pine boughs and trees were used to decorate 
the various nooks and corners of the room, helping to carry out the Christ- 
mas idea. The stage, where the orchestra sat, was banked \\itli Christ- 
mas greens, and the refreshment tables at ili«- front of the hall were ;il>i> 
covered with greens and man} candles. 

The reception committee with Miss Jeanne Daane ;■> chairman was 
most congenial and gave ;> warm welcome to all. 

The Armory was decidedly cold ;ill evening, altho the rainbow colors 
helped warm and cheer things t" ■> great extent. The cold was .•> marked 
feature <>f the evening and caused much mirth and merriment since some 
i>t" tin- ladies were compelled t<> wear shawls while dancing. 

The main source of entertainment was dancing, mid the music ren- 
dered thruout the evening was suitable for tl><- modern dances. Many 
varieties were participated in- and ;ill appreciated the privilege of dancing 
tin- modern one-step, <•!<-. Mr. Harold Zillman was chairman of the 
mi usic commit tee. 

The programs were of a new and original style and proved attractive 
;i> well as useful. The committee in charge gave great thought and con- 
sidered many kinds and designs before making their choice. Mr. Alvin 
Schaefer was head <»i" the program committee. 

Refreshments were served thruoul the evening and the mint frappe 
was in harmony with the color scheme. Miss Josephine Schaller was in 
charge of this committee. 

The Grand March was l«'«l bj l>i and Mrs. L. I). Harvej and nil who 
attended the Prom took part in it. This proved t<> l>«- one of the most 
enjoyable features of tin- evening. 

Mr. Robert Post had charge of il>«- draying committee and ;ililt<> his 
w«»il< <liil not fall <'ti Prom night, still we must admit that I * ■ — > assistance 
w ;i> invaluable. 

The entire evening was ;< success and the Junior class appreciated the 
honor given them, and the kind reception made both Juniors and Seniors 
feel as one class. The Prom given by the Class of 1915 was the best Prom 
ever given ;it Stout. It <-x<-«-ll«-<l ;ill others and the date <>t' November twen- 
tieth, ninteon hundred and fourteen, i* never t" be ;■ forgotten one. The 
Prom was under the direct supervision of the class president, Miss Agnes 
McCarthy, and special thanks are due her for her -*•»!«- management of the 
Juniors first and best I'mm ;it Stout. 




I9l£5 







'■MM 


^13^1 Hr^r ■ ml 


^B Ib 2 






■/. 



- 



>ne>Hundrcd>Forty*Blght 



W&e'k'ly 'Mml 



The Si. .in Institute, 

September ''. l"l l. 
I >.-ni Wilhemena i 

I Imf been gone ■ i«>nu time awa) from 
ymi yet. almoal tree daya. I>i- i- mm pig 
place believe ma, I Imlf ii«»« almaet l<«-i 

..in-.- iind Will mil .-in nil I mol.il.' i.v.t run 

wenn I was die time on die clock counting, 

\h, dal i- «iiii pig tower and wat land 
•...null ii makes. Wat ■ nost dia achule 
makes. S65.00 I pa) .ii.- man already die 
fir>i day Kere. Wal dal ooat I <l<> '><•' nee 
f..r .ill I do i- hammer und mw nil die day 
long, Der la some queer girls here. Die 
oder one loolai vusl lokie il m I -•>« i><-- 

for<-. I -«•<• not for why lluil i-. Stripes . 

».tri|M'K ware ever I -<•.■. Sometimes 1 gel 
nil mixed up mil mj eyoa. !>••> « - -■ • 1 1 — do- 
striped tint}* uni forma. \h-r>- i- -nl t* 

hen which makes ii ■ > i « ••- . «!•• n I my swaps 
fim hai always yet. Aoh we poya had Home 
fin.' spectagel last night, M> teachei Mr. 
ll.'.'li\. why !"• hoa tine l>iu girl bj his 
Im.ii-.' already yet and he look us <>ui ware 
In- "set dem up" bi die !•••>- Miy. tch, 
audi words • >- the] use here. -«• funny. 
1 1 makea me "II confused. Everybody i- 
fussing, I did not for wun long time know 
\.ii fuaelng wruo. Now I know. Sevent) 
more days 1 oounl mit 'Ii. - oalendar <>n. 
dal is Thanksgiving, Aoh, Wilhemena, 
den I rill go fussing. Day linka ««• much 
afraid «>f die dark have. After 7:20 <li.- 

hauas we i-mm..! leaf I I muni in bod 

goat 10&30. We only through the window 
i in- dark see. 

I um veil and hope ) ire the name. 

Yours mil Liebe, 
HANS. 

Tli.' si. .in Lnatitute, 

September 1"». I'M I. 

I >.-mi Pal : 

Kow «)• take ms pen in hand to lei you 
know that wwmhi my heart is after aoheing 
for n line I'riim me Patsy. Ye needn't !»«■ 
thinking thai rich! awa) < h loft >.- inn be 
inkiii' up with thai Kittj O'Reilly. And 

in ii in ii .ill the waj iver to Stout to be 

learning hom to '>•• ■ gud wife Fui ■■••■ 
l - "ur shame on ye Patriok Dolin! N«.w -it 
perself dun and '"- concerned in making a 
ropl] t<> this l.-tiiT what Oi ink.' lime fur 
awa) tram in-. Chemistr) I. ••.-on to In- 
writing. Me teacher in thai i- a fine 

Irish mini, ri.ht mI.-i in.' own llaerl he i-. 

l.iii -ittl<- yourself mun, never •■ look nor 

.i -ii-li will Ik- Ui\«'. fur 1 • • -~ own shin) (op 

tells me he haa ■ foin woman, ^ hal 
think ye I Mi— Kugel Was telling US goile 

iiow to tell .i good mini when we - ne 

.■ml in.- with my better Imlf nlrcnd> -il- 



soted. Mi— Leedom, the lad) what keeps 
ii- -o oorreotly behaved has gone out for 
i in- svein'. llothiT tin- ml.'-. -«■/. oi. what 
.Jin i.i out elders w>> gadding "ml Rapes as 
here working loik rale nigera, « >i think < * i 
•lout iji-i in.' .i mun here fur to go gadding 

wi<l. fur niv.T ii liny OOlored rihhon or til- 
th) we be daring i<> ware. And aoh I'ni-y. 
ye « u/ alius saying Iwas a b rich I red thnt 
become me, Loal Saturda) .ill the young 
L'.'in- wux here fur to sail on th.-ir gala 
ami th<- oonsequenow would appal ye. 
Arh an it '- th«- truth <>i h.- telling ye, the) 

nil got ■ hnth on I of -<• lu-.l u I.-. Ami lli.il 

nelf -.nil.- nigh I wasn't I >i after spending 
fifteen fine pennies lo -•■«• Home Swate 

Home ni the vies. Man) was the tears 

that happened to fall hut niver ■ wun <li'! 
OI spatter, Your iinl don't be weeping 
hut. Pats) .ii '- splitting no- haerl i- to -.-.• 

you mill tin- mitlu-r and the WOS OOt on 

the hither. But ater Oi sta) in the libror) 
n while and li-i to the blarnej and ohatter 
Mrs. Hahn shure and <>i think <»iv- 
been seeing me om n ohipper mit her. Now 
Pats) don't i"- delaying, I'd give me old 
shoes fur to nee yes and just hi- remember' 
Ing, Patriok me darllnt, ■ li.it I'll oome back 
it foin lady !■• wed »••. 

Yer cm n Irish gal. 

At a; IK I INNI'.dAN. 

I*. S. S.i> p. it. <»i. nm glad y«-r not h«-r<-. 

Two foin gals ji-t oome fram the iiii.-«. 

Tin- heavenly twin- we l»- calling them. 

The) -liui.- mi.- the perl ones but ye wn/ 

alius ih<- io I..- losing yer hn.'n to tin- 

ga) on..-. Ami indade Oi'll hi' a happy 
en) when I be soaking tho word- what ti<'« 
ye up wit h me alius. 



Mali dear M i— 



Tin- Stout Instil in.-. 

September 22. VU I. 

• m kin-: 



\h m— u.iii jrou, in ji h dear, ii v; i ^ «— me 
ijriNii pleasurah to answah youah kind 
lettah, Mnh health i- nol -•■ well .'- \l. 
for Ah find ii so difficult t<> manage a 
oanoe. All ready have Ah ruined thr.'.- 
-nil- .mil vouah know thnt Ah nm nlw.iv- 
ir.-ful <>f m> apparrel. So the) hml 
io in- Immedintel) discarded. Vh! Pardon 
in.-. AI-. m. -.in discarded ■■- -..on na Ah 
reached my dwelling place. It reall) 
pusaela me thai Ah nm an unlucky, while 

Mi— Sim.- and l.uiiilnh nevah think of 
falling in. Ah do not think of it i-iihi-r. 

Ah iu-i go over before Ah iu.%.- time i<> 
think. And Itrunkow mid Mi— Agnes 
Bo — . neither one of ih.-m weighing more 
than m stone, balance their eanoe n- neat- 
Is as even Ah could wish. 



■-Hundred-F 








Good '.Mines 




Pace ( toe-Hundrad'Ftfty-Tvro 








ae'k'ly iViall 



These AmtricuM -'■«- niofa funnah people. 
Why, i he other daj Joseph Priak took a 

Ooffee hat h. Ah hav.-n "l foil nil out what his 

purpose was but Ah suppose ii was <" gsin 
aa fine a oomploxion sa nahn. Hut then 
really Ah don't -••■• whj in- didn't nee lee. 




SO$£PH P/HSA.rcHts c eofftt both 



Do \ou know, .ill tin- boya in [ealoua of 
iih'. Ali inn mon mi immaculate d ro w ith. 
vow know. The entire faeult) haw pur- 

i-ha-.-d new -nit- Kill urn .1 one to OOpaN 

with iiuiliii. Baaok and Christoffel both 

triad to oaf ■hint ms, but did not suae I. 

Haaok la holding on to lii* monej rathah 
tightly. I!.- will no doubt naad it -■- two 
oannot live an cheaply aa one, you know. 
Ah don't know what Chria expects to do 
with lii-.. inn in- weare nueh a beautiful 
-mill- that Ali expect the wont 

Ah do not plaj foot ball at all beoauac it 
takea the preaa out of mah garments and 
Ah do not care to wear the regular suits. 

All mil BO -h-mliih. don't yon know. 

Mr. Buxton aaked me the other day about 
Chippendale and about hi- work. Ah told 
him In- was ;i personal friend of mil • 
in-v.ih did a pieoa of work in hi- life. Ah 
gueaa Mr. Buxton baa a good opinion of 
me now. Bin. iiv tin- wajr, who i~ thia 
Chippondale fellah anyway? 

some of the work here ia very vulgar. 
One day \h soiled mah handa to ruoh an 
extent that Ah had to use oommon aoap 
t<> purify them. The oiroomatanoca were 
oortainlj moat humiliating. 

The young ladlea here ere all very j > l> — 
dinary. And Ali have been told that they 
quahl moat disgustingly ovah the men. 

May Ali express tin- wiah that you are 
well mid hn|)|>\ '.' 

Ah remains youaha sinoerely, 

Mr. Lloyd Graham Claude Halifax, 
Pei Mr. Mauohah kfulbUekkina. 
The Stout In-t it ut<-. 
Ootober r. I'M 1. 



Dearest Sell: 

When I lifted my head from the pillow 
thla morning, there laj your latter on the 
table. Oh, I was tiokledl I've I n hav- 
ing the moat miserable time apent the 
last four daya In •»«•«! wrapped up iik«- a 
nununj and feeling aa oroaa aa one of the 
boya usually look-. I'd like to throw the 
blame of the thing away from me but ii 
would Just fall baok on me with a whaok. 
I hate to confess it but I ate twelve lee 
oream com-- at the Stout pionio Saturday. 
That horrid Charlie Hyde said li<- waa do- 
ing to put it in the Annual. F only hope 
In- don't find our how aiok thej made me 
and i>ut that In too. In one of the games 
played at the pienie Mr. Grubert had to 
whistle. He rolled up hia tongue In ■ 
fanny little knot and gave ua -i "Cracked 
imii.it Ion of a piooolo." 

YOU know Kuth II. mill Mi— Aha (\. 
don't you? Thej are partners In eooking 
i Li--. Mi— Alva has to be verj oareful of 
herself and ao -in- never eata anything that 
-h.- rook- ami Ruth hates to eee anything 
w sated. 

There i- the funniest little oriokef <>f a 

man going to Stout. He -<|Ui-ak» ju-t like 
a kaly-diil. Hi- ri-miml- 111. ■ ol" om- of 

those wobbly jumping jaoka the kind 

that work- with a String. 

So m i- of the ^irl- organised a Hikers Club. 
I think they are rather tooliah. Strolling 

i- nici-r and lot- mor<- i-\«i 1 in u. I think. 

of co urs e, you don't get a letter for stroll- 
ing but you generally get something bet- 
ter. Irm.i got B diamond ring. I \M.mh-r 

how long ahe will keep it'-' 

Katharine Howea fust oame in to find 
out if w-«- ahould out tissue paper bowa on 

the hia-. Think of that! Auyom- lould 

t«-ll -in- oame from Downer. 

Ituth Anderson announoed li<-r engage- 
ment not long ago and now -In- BBya it 

isn't true. I wonder whj aha threw the 
fellow over ao soon. I wish ahe would t<-ll 

11- all about it. but soma i pic 

secret Ive. 

Weill I simply must •-•••t up and dress, 
for I have a date after as se m bly, tonight. 
Lovingly, 
what there i- l«-ft of Anne. 
1*. s. itmii II. ia Buffering from a asr- 
loua attaok of indignation. 

(Wise Mi— Gorby. 

Tin- Stout In-t it ul.-. 
O.toh.-r lv. 19] I. 

Hello old Pali 

I got it into my In-all la-t night 

that I owed you a letter. But take it from 
mi-, kill, there'a not much doing here. 
Our football punohera got kicked off the 



Page Onc-Hundred-Fifty-Thrcc 



Wmilii.'a£ -^'shooi 




mdrc-d-l ; ift> 



'Wazkiy Mail 



gridiron bj River Falla la-t week and I 
haven't kjii down -in«-.-. l*i<-iiii lout two 

finui-r- in I lie mill. I ijin-— . Ik- w a- think* 
ini: of R. S. Say. I ha\<- onl) f..ur I. it- to 

tain my ijirl to i In- next dance on. If 
you have any <-\tra dough around l'«l be 
ih<- happy on* t<. get it. Ami I'd mire, 

pa— it back •.(.mi. Ii..ii l*o-t went up tin- 
Ink u- evening and found Mauoh pad* 

(Hint! around with bin hande. Ha said, 
•Ml- SKI>" imt I mi.-- von know. I 

found a noli- to O. B, \ i--li-rda> . I I ri-ad-. 
"I ciin'l ki-.-p m\ .->.-- ..fl from yon." It 

wee signed B. W. Thai B. W. might i»- 
Emma Webeter, Bdith Whipple, Ethel 
Whiting, Elisabeth Ware, Bather Wold, 
Elian Wlnkloy <>r Edna Wohlere. I am 

going to find out which on.- of tli.-m it 

Mil-. I have ii faint idoa thai it was Edna 
Wohlere, If anybod) i- havin4 h tfood 
time iu-r<- Et'a Brunkow. Hi- geta ■ new 
tirl ever) day, Blanche and In- stole a 
pumpkin one day and f<-«l ii i<> some pige. 
Tin- next da) one of thoee pit-- < I i. -« t with 
oholera infantum. 

Bay, what «h> you know about thin 
Al Sohaefer bought ■ raaor, I don't see 
what In- wanta it for. (»f oourae, it 
for mi emergency, lint thin fool kid wot 
.1 eafet) raaor I I suppose yon knew Haiick 
i- teaching here. When he wan fir-t of- 
fered tin- job, they told him the) would 

PO) What In- W a- Worth, hut In- -;iiil, "I'll 

h<- durned if I'll work f«-r that*" Say, 
nurrj tin- tin -pot I'm a need) iSuy. 

^ our ohl pal. 

BILL. 



To a Uniform 

Oh, you tfingham uniform. 

With -trip.-- of white ami liliu-, 

I think eomobod) ought t<> \% i i i «- 
A f.-w kind word- to you. 

Some of u- make you fancy. 
While others make you plain. 

But •' uniform i- a uniform 

There i- something in tin- niiitu'. 

\\ <• wear you when we're sewing; 
\\ .- wear you when we cook; 
We wear you out upon the street 
No matter how you look. 

We -p.itt.-r you with adds 
And -pot you o'er witli ink. 

\\ .- -.-ml you to tin- laundry 

Where you -hrink and -hi'ink and shrink. 

Itut all t hi- unkind treatment 
.lu-t makes you oloeer eling; 
It -i-.-m- we cannot !••-.- you 
B) doing an) t hing. 

When da) - at aohool ■ 
Ami it'- time to lav you by, 
I'm rare that every one of us 
Will pack sou with e sigh. 

Vim have wiliu-— .-.I all our trial-. 

^ on have shared our triumplu too. 
So when we think of 1 1 f «- at Stout 
Our thoughts will inalude you, 

B. M. IV 




ine-IIundred-Fifty-1 



j- r-i- » 



Th a £iJ: o-LLi: iFieelhoTil 



~\ 



Voh 



IS, \\ i-.. November 11. 1 *i 1 1 



Till 



iOLii Ii2£2lD2ffl 



Tin- Stout Annual Board Managers. 

Parka Bailey, Editor. Thai i- until he 
gets firad. 

All StOUl Gossips Reporter*. 
Subscription Kai.- \iw« itcttlM |i;i\- 

able monthly. Any j..k.- payable i"> ad- 
ranoa. 

Publiahed ererj ii than hi new* 

.•in. null i<» fill the page. 



[Local i\ f, = '. . ' '. . . 

Sot. I Mr. Hansen broke tin- white 
collar rule at nasi mlilj 

Sor. •"> Mr. Gilbert won stock pin mini- 
bar fourteen today. 

Sot. T The Girl Hik«-r- had their pio- 
: ii res taken. 

Sauxhaud tries to Mow up forge -hop. 

Mr. Brunkow -how- hie -kill in basket* 
l.uli whh ill.- real ol the Idda. 

Mr. Bslindor co tehee .> mouae iw ■< dem- 
onstration before hiaSenioi Printind Class. 

Ml-- [dele S. reoeived ■ apoon for interior 
deoora i (on. 

Sor. s Mi— Mm- Vim Duxee announced 
i«> the Psychology class that ehe onl} uaed 
Iht arm- whan she went canoeing. 

Nov, in Mi— William- Informed h« - r 

< I.i— in baoteriolog) that the bacteria 
"bacillus prodidiasus" was secured from 
Mi— McCnlmont'a coooanut. 

Sot. II Mi— I. loin was heard laugh- 
ing. 

S..\ l.' Mi— on. -..ii -.-.■ii -trolling. 
Sot. X'.i More information reoeiTed rrom 

< i. W. regarding hia oaae. 

Harrej Selaon becomes subject i«> thai 
dread disease of fimsinfl. Brace up 

Harrey, «<• nil sympathise with you. 

Mr. Buxton fails to deaoribe space. Or- 
ganisation olaea claim it waa beoauac "f 
n ahortage of word*. 

Let the man who doaa n«»i wish to be 
idle, fall in lore. 

Should there be ■■ ncarcitj of dirls, the 
1). s. Faculty would be pleaaed i<« fill 
dates. 

Mi— McFadden announcee thai aa 
mtit-li deliberation ia needed i>< studyind 
Psychology »- In playing eheokera. 



Nlllllh.T 1 



Clmircii itf oil ess 

Mi— MeC i- m> teacher, I shall not pa—. 

She malt. ih me !<• explain vague theoriea 
and exp ose th my Ignorance to the 
claii. 

She restoreth my sor r ow. 

Sin* oauaee me i<> write utruotural formu- 
la- for my <-lu— •■- »nkf. 

Ymm, though I study 'iil mitlniiiltt I -hall 
data no knowledge for the reactions 
trouble me. 

She prepareth a teal for me In the presence 
of i ii<- learned. 

She tfiveth m<- a low murk. 

Sural) distress and sadness shall follow 
me all the days of mj course. 

And I shall remain In my Chemletry olaas 
for erer. 



To* Bale 

l.a-l rear's Annual- Annual Uoar.l. 

Surplus lund energy French lo. 

A worn out lirin <i. T. Mr. N, I., mill l)u. 

Prescriptions for hair tonic KUad b> 
Mar) Martin. Warranted to grow a bid 
braid of hair in n fortnight. 



ILosi and fo'tmfl 
Pound An advantage at last. A -hurt 

man lookind UP -•<•- farther than a lull 

man looking down. Herbert Lundi 

round i iii .i physiology '••- , paper. 

"For good health do not eat during meals." 
Pound "An Idea In my mind." — Mr. 

< Srubert. 

Pound A n.-M kind of shower apparatua. 

s...ii.\ water always at your command. 

Inquire of I. W. and I. s. 

Lost A chaperon at the social dano 

StOUt Armory. 

Pound A kitty Ernest Gomstoek. 



'yYani .Ails 
Dai.- Wanted Inquire of Ann Mull at 
Lynwood. Please <l< i call a second 

I inn-. 

Wanted A look ..i the •tan after 7:30 

Stout Si in I. -iii-. 

Wanted Information a- i<> the where- 
abouts of Idella S. ••" September In. 

w . i ■ 1 1 • -c l a patent medicine to counter- 
an ih.- frldhtful raTadea which the <li-- 
...... homesickness, i- hartad upon the 

Juniors. 




Thz Qloirl Jiathmil 



w .«.. N'ovcmbor IK, 1 -» 1 I 



Nil ml. 



'f J ' 



y'i O'li'i Si i &ll O'X il 



Loccd -,/•= 



i'sinz 



ill! 



The Si. ..it Annual Board Managers. 
Parka i- -till with an ■- Bditor. 
The S ton I Paoult) Reporters. 

Subscription rates The pri f •> Stoul 

Aiimi.il. payable in advance. 

Published every time the K«lit<>r gets full 
..f rum 



There are t«<> sides !•• every quewtion 
the "ion-... -> ■ c l • - and <>nr idde. 

One <>i" tin- aureel ways to make a man 
consider you ■ peraon of remarkably Hound 
judgment i- to look al him sadly and * « - 1 1 

him In- i- working loo li.ircl. 

Tinir and tide wait for no man. The 
untied waif for man. 

There are timea which trj men's souls 
Exam <l;i> -. 



"Anninl 

Abundant -u|>i»l> of men! 

( • > r l -> are nil happy. 

No>. . |3 The ooming ol the Univcrsit) 

band caused great happiness among i li« 

I), s. lUrba. For onoe there iteemed to l>« 

enough men to go around. 



\..v. {O 



Nuff -■ 



mgh &t 



ttCUM 



\ ■_•!<-. ii success. All who attended tdi- 
wonderful display of nature have lived to 
report it* effect*. Mr. Lunder was oompli* 
men ted by a special ohorus number. 
I of the animals died following the 
performance. 

Incident in Food Study 

Bright Junior "Do the) ever make 
sausages out of dogs?" 
[natructor "No." 
Little Junior "Well, I aaw some men 

Ink.- ■ little dog into I In- liul.'li.T -Imp mill 

weigh him. V*. M. 

Teacher "What i« tripe." 
Kin. I Junior A liircl. 
Second Junior A snake. 
Third Junior A fish. 



Sovember. 13. M. Hannah waa seen 
flirting ^iili n number of the Regimental 
band boys. 

Novomber 17. The initial meeting of 
tin- y, W. <". A. waa held and a successful 
year is expeoted. 

November IT. Peggj hod a Prom Hid. 

November 18. Sewing for the Belgians. 

November I s . Annual Board Meeting! 




nC6UlATlCN STRlKS. 

Novoill li.T .'.'. liliinrli.- .iil.Tlnin.il n 

few of li«-r Lynwood rriends. in 1 1 » «• dining 
mom. after hours. 

November 23, The second program of 
the Philomathean Societ) was held to- 
night. 'I'm., very special features were ■> 
reading by Mi-- Bennett and a solo •>> Miss 
MoM aster. 

S mber 21. Several days vacation 

declared!. 

November '.'''>. Thanksgiving Day. ~ 
• >f ii- ere ni home, some at someone else's 
home and all showed ili«- day a good time, 
Doctors in evidence. 

November '"■>. Students return gladly 
to i heir work. 

November 30. Knowledge was received 
at Nelson's that Doc Yak had •• date for 
the Prom. Brotherl) advice aided thesit- 

lllltion. 

Slriihs 
A new moustache Mr. Bslinger. 

A l>r,-iill« of Iio|h- Junior- nfli-r second -i\ 

\s.'.-k tests. 
Foul smells Chemistry Laboratories. 

StOUl Spirit. 

Her sense «>f humor being over taxed, she 
leal ii Humorous Bditor of the Annual. 
Mae's ourioait) . 
Several deaths were unavoidably deferred 



'l r haz& 




Page Onc-Hundred-Fifiy-EiBht 



The £>itmi liadhrrxii 



Volume l 



Menomonle, Wis.. November 36, 1914 



Number 3 



\'lo'Si'l Sinchoicl 



The stout Annual Board Manaders. 
Mr. Gilbert Editor. 

All i.f Mr. Gilbert's- friend* Reportera. 
Published over) lime the staff data funny 



Tb« Oood Stories of iths £>ay 

When aakad boa aha would distinduiah 
botweon ethyl and methyl alcohol, Mi— M. 
Conwaj replied thai idte would trj thara 

both on ili«- dog. Tl is thai killed him 

would l><- mot hyl. 

found Junior! "My. I <l«> think poor 
Mi-.- ItnUi-r i- -■■ ii ■■ luck > . sin- i- always 
loosind somethind- Never ■ da] tfoea bj 
bul what thara i- ■> aotioa up thai ahe has 
lost eomethlnd*" Mies Bakar ban . 
of the l). s. loal and found articles. 

Mi-- MoCaulo) i- .in expert on divind 
point.!- about beam and I rue love knots. 

Ho* man) studies are you earryiniiV 

Jr. I'm cuMMiii three and draddind four. 

Mi— Kudel to Junior «iil-. "Don'l !><•- 
Uevo every thind the Senior* tell jrou. 




TO 





£-((((( (((I f 






Wiiiiied — a sliver from tin- Annua] 
Board. 

Wanted Some monej in the Bank. 
(Hex Christmas iSift.t 

Wanted The sound aleepan ;■• 1 1 • <- 

Manl.-v ('lull to -top their hoi-l.-roii- 

anorintf. 



I have discovered ;> rorj effieienl system 
..f typewriting. In honor <»f the two 
famous gentlemen, I have named the 
aystom The Hum ,m.i Pooh System. 

I ahall be r»rj dlad to ;iiv.' instruc i- to 

i.l! a ho wiah t hem. A- ; , reeommendatlon, 
I saddest, Mr. Georde trliss Jester. Mr. 
.l.-i.r has roconti) attained the speed ol 
rindind thirteen key* per minute and 
belnd able t<> "Peek" m leaal ten per 
minute. Knutson. 

Queries smil Ansvnxn 

Does Jeater like the odor ol red popper? 
Answer. Ask him. 

Podd) Rodde «••- heard lo -..> "Darn" 
before " m< mber of 1 1 •«- Faoulty. 

How did ahe dare? 

Answer. Itoamooul before she 1 1 

We should I i !*«• to know whj they -hot 
Abraham Linoolu and lei Boob Blaekman 
lire? Bidned. Inquisitive. 

Answer. Mistokes lit*.- this sometimes 
no matter how careful ever) one i-. 
Let us hope thai this n attar will soon be 
reel ified. 





•Nil- 



Local ftews Items 

December •">. Purd) hears <>f tl 

of t In- tobaoOO nil -I-. 

December II. Goldbord announces to 
the Organisation •in— that we should <ill 
ii-<- common sense. 

Page ' tac-Hundred-1 



r 



'W& Are : ; ;i Wa ilr< 





"ilDU/i LTi 8 SlhtXTil 



Wis., I).- 



!>'. 191 I 



'l r h- 



'i oiii'i; Si 'iz cii o'£ ii 



IBi^HHHaHHIHiBBBiHB 

lii.- si. .ui Annual Board Managara, 

Mr. Gilbert, Editor 
\!l done-alae! Reporter*. 

Subscription rate*. Nothing this being 

ill.' last imuit ol tin- > ear niifl know in., ili.it 

»i' mii-i make oertain resolutions we 
might as well ii i * •• it away. 
Published for the 1 j«— t time. 



'jlii 



s . j.\. ^ 



•aaicl 



Tainter Annex. Nov. '.i Never In 1 1 » «• 

pages ol history has tit |ual oi tlii* 

horrible fight been recorded. The charges 
of the contestants were so swift and num- 
erouM i luii they were beyond the power of 
human oomprehenaion. They both drop- 
ped dead in each others' arma at the rerj 
•ante Instant and neither one has been 
i In- same since. 



' 






A- m.iii\ Lynwood Hall liirls as were able 
gathered In the lower hall of the Stout 
Institute tlii- afternoon to attract the 
M. T« boys t.> their oandy -»j • I «• . Their 
drawing powera were (real and fort) dol- 
in monej represent the results of 
i ii.ir labors. 

V W. C< A. orgs i 

Nov. in Philomathean Meeting. 

Son . 1 1 Assembly. 

Individuals who posted Qawkers notice 
.it l ; i— t found out. Through the untiring 
efforts of «ur faithful detective. Baker 

Bibbs, tlii- awful secret has »i lasl I n 

unearthed. Misses Tessman and Bullion 
are 1 1 • « - suspects. The report i- crude as 
yet and officel approval should be obtnlncd 
before giving public notice. 

Mews iVboni the School 

October '-."■. Girls are seen lioinjj i" Hre 
in luiili robes. All the fellows attend the 
fir.-. Mrs. Weir *-;i 1 1«-<1 the girls from the 
fir.- with ;i dinner bell. Koto. This 
piece ••!' news dot loal in the Humorous 
Editor's diotionarj the last time she used 
ii „.. i« slightly delayed. 

Martin Liddy. while dreaming <>f Mr. 
Ilillix, fell out of bad. 



liOTfaWni 

When .i man John White stands in an 
imploring attitude with outstretched 
arms, whal am I to think? Connie W. 

Answer i ll«- was onlj ■ trifle out of lii- 
head because of the Stevens Point Football 
tfame. 

Canyon t.-H me whether Berg was asleep 
or just in Dream Land from St. Paul to 
Menomonie? Klk«-. 

Answer: Oh, no, he was no( asleep 
someone might have run off with her. 

!■» ii polite for John \\ I « i « «• to take us 
out to rlali lii- friends? 

Mauch ami Frogner. 

Answer. No. If you wish to become 
inted you should seek advice from 
more In t imate friends. 



■-T3 



pi NOTICt; 

I There uiJ beameebng of 

the- 0AVKER5-CLUE. 

n»ffll- |;l ""-li)fttliii, 

— $• ALL Q/JI/flQ Bt WW* $— 
A r*u girl will pQ53 fhru ihr hall. 

The Gawkera club has rinall) been defi- 
nitel) organised. The club .•\|>«'<-t>. to 
hold it- meetings In the lower hall. The 
officers elected were: A. Jay Blackman, 
Presidents James K. Trebilcock, \ Ice 
President: Assistants, Kavanaugh Brothers 

Prominent Members: \n<l> Andi 
Zimmerman, Kelton, Brinkmann, Brad- 
ahaw, Bike, Felet. Benjamin, Hovlid, 
Liddj and Liddy. Wood Turning Room 
Puasers. Mr. French, Lunder and Sohae- 
i.-r k.-<-|> the radiator warm in ilo- main 
ii.iil. Others too numerous to mention. 

We begin to wonder if we will !><• excused 
. I.!. iv ..: so early so that we can got home a 
i rifle si ■■ 

Klk Mound play* Stout. Forty-two to 
seven. 

MissTresona otto be careful because she 
might •-•••! bronchitis. 








Csilsucla* 



January CalrkUT 

From ilii» aaortmanl of fanta, 

rqualnted *• ■ 1 1 1 thl* audual aaaamblj 

tll,l\ Ih II.- vll ill I llll. lit- Vtitll Si. .Ill 

■Indent* •'"■I ni-l rut lnr» ill 

minutaa. 

.Iinill.iri I HoM 111. nix Htoul — 1 1 1 - 
..I m>l lo break, hour* an) mora? 

Januarj -' Paa* and . Minni 

|MT rnilroml lo 11 food Inn. 

Janu • ~ M. Ijiin 

- ii rubbei I 

.1 1> ll mi r s I Mr K.linu.-r It'll- how llif 
|)C« .1 .. 

.I.uii - Kmil. Ownarahlp 

of Trad* BuUdli 

Trabilroch, Kelton and Gilbert Indultfe. 

1 1 of ihe l>. S. student* alao an 1 Ii«t«-. 
Purdj awaara off fu—inu- Why? Dowaon 
naya iluii aralkind i- rather bad. I« T«ni<i 

• •f 1 In- Mini 

K. II.? "I will liii Jim- aome 
daj aa The 

Junior* *ho« iii.ir »|niii ii> boost ind 
\111n1.1l malarial and coin. 
Januarj s M i-« Mi I 

Kb* looked .11 mm thni ■ 

-l"|K' 

January '» Tin- Philo'a entertain. Pea- 
mil hiintu, poftrorn hall*. -Ink 
1*1 tun. -i "Mi Borne G trl. " 

Januarj 1" Priaa men baakind in tha 

• mi. That** riw-lil . I hi 

I lllML - I III. .11-1. 1, ll. - 

ilway* 
witli feminine i-liiir.u-ta ri-t i< - 

i<i teaah Primarj Handwork In tha fir»t 
£rad< \«k llalvaraon and Brinkmann 

for |Mi ' 

Januarj 12 Mm William* i.-ll- I". 
Barker thai aha blowa into tha alaaa lik<- a 

• iMli tinnier. 

Januarj l I Mr*. X«***rr *cen in I) 

■ ■ '« • li.nr. 1 : 1" |> ill. 

I ill Bad .1? Il.llf lllll-t :| llf 

imp |>lni .«. 
Januarj 11 II. Ilnrkei »ii 

< ..is .1. . .1 »..lln -i III |.l.' I i.i in. Ilk.- 

. ralla** Bii i hdaj Pai 
Januarj IS Whj i« Marian I'nder l«*fi 
hand ad. 

January 1<. < I. irk lo Bradahaw, - 
rou've w<.i .i «.i|i jii-i lik<- 

llr.nUliiix "Vim- I I'm uoini) ri till I 

horn* and throw mini a* 

Januarj '■' Moah waddintf. What ■« 

Januarj IN Jarkaon lakaa off lii» uni- 
form In front i.f ihe aehool to walk home 
w it li Omnia v» .ir.-. 



io Glen- 
wood< III.m km. in — j r a thai tha tablaa w.-r.- 
poor and wouldn't lake rrvrrw \ 

Jan I ■ I- In. i-la— i lint 

li. i* tfoind '■• in. irk ill. in below /> r... 
Tw i-ii i \ below .li. ad) 

ifi.-r .i pip* ■tratahar. 

in. "Kn-ii ili. heart of 
it ehild knowath It* own bitti 

lattar 
from Hankj Pankjr. 

.r ll.ir\.. interview* Johnnie I) 

..n i he «ii '.•• < i ..f I ' 

.'." Miil-n-.ir I ..linn. ii. .iii.nl 

<ii iln- Memorial. (ma-half of 

over. Kitchen *hower for l>. Biehmond. 

^ W. Km l. -rl.. nun. nl . 

"*Mi. Miimm, i. I 

tha i»-> * 

Januarj ill \ pail of 
from I 

J. iiiii.ii% .•'. Our check liook* are *l 
It w.. 

Januai ■■ .''. I n foi mal ion i. 

i- Mm.. Millar. 

Januarj TS Kumor* afloat, *oma adrift 
and *ome .1 1— uaaad. 

J.m- Ilium i« lakaa ill. 

JS Fronted n<~.-» «r«- rommon, 
Mr. IJ.n show* .i mathod of conrari 
• nil into iin 

Jim ii i . i. < .i. .- i ; I. -, i... . . i Kalr 

picture* taken. Oraal difficult) 
parianoad in keeping I ham qulat. 

Y« W.*« and Y. M.'« li. — ful 

r.,ll>. 

Januarj- 30 Harry Crocket I haadefinite- 
In di • lain plant* »r.- i»-.mhI 

eompanj/. Ha lik.« to lurra « amall fern 
««iili 1. 1 1 ii . 

Januarj SI Whan ll. Towl* waatad to 
■leap Bundaj aftarnooa aha quotad a "Ufa 
wild. ml ii . Iini it-rinu r.H.m mm.- w.ml.1 !»*• 



Tmhnmxj CmlBadax 

Mi-. Ilnliii an>- -In- talk* le— in 1.1. - 

than in .in» athar month l»«-«-au»e 

il ■• III.- «li..i 

Fab. I Found I" Ituili Pool** lab oup- 
board •« ••■ i '»r kaaww. 

Fab. -' Mi— Johnaon dlatrlbutad (•.'» 

i<> I he <-.m. km 4 • 

M ■-- baud mi i - 

even in Menomonia. 

Mi I n illiimin- 

atini i. ilk .... < . i-. 

I Him. k and Hehlmmel I...1I1 show 
a lirenl afflnltj for fr.-«li paint. 

ill- comaa. ~m-« .nu I *. .ilk- 
n» .i» Vol limu lit ;«. 



Calssida* 



Ilarehbarger flunk- hi- whole plumbing 
class w <• twOi 

Feb. i; Hiu.-low tukea Ml— Orrla to the 

l.ii-kfl ball liiiin.-. 

Feb. r ('<.lil weather i- n-.t always fav- 
orable to fu— dng. 

Fob. 8 Mum Tumor tftvee an after- 
ihoator part) at < !haeee. 

Pob. '■> Monlea Flonlgan ontortabu the 
Phllo Soeiotj »i'i' her Oral U-npreaaiona of 
Stout - 

Feb. 1" Thoae pi.--.-in ai A— .emblj 
learn the % n I •< •- of boracdc >< i<l and the 
dangers of kissing. 

Feb. 11 Why. oh wh) <ii<ln"t -mm- mo- 

hand ■•> auoh '■ julo) i>ii as iiii- - ri 

!>.•.•. .'.">, 1011 But her says -li<- hopaa ii 
will inn u.i Into ili- Vnnual. It waa ■< 
80" l>> 88" and waa marked, "To Bather 
from Parka." Bather need not have wor- 
ried aa we have little uoo for It. 

Pab. 12 Stout «in~ from Minnesota 
\wii-. Cupid i- on iln- job. s»-«- Bthel 
Whiting. 

Feb. 13 Chrieteneen takea '< C-irl to the 
Grand. Second offense! 

Feb. II Mr. Gilbert receives eighteen 
prettj valentinea. Page onlj £eta « look 
of hair. 

Feb. I" New I), s, buildind booms with 
briok. si andahl calls on Buck Schotl to 
i aoite. 

Pab. 16 Dreahi ■ spends Mauch's nickel. 
< >u«ii! Aak them about it. 

Fab. I" Clock strikes thirty-*!* times 
in honor of Lent. Bthel Whiting's engage- 
.ii.ni and "" revaronoa the moustaches, 

We -till hear about the Outlaws tfobuj 
io ( ilonwood. 

Fab. I s Goaael and Goldbord swap 
knives. Goldie £eta i In- worst of "in- deal. 

rlaseel Halveraon akw tries to sell -"in ie 

but j$et- tin- linli- <-n«l of the deal. 

Feb. 1" Are von dotag np tonight. 
Zillman? 

Ritter enjoys the evening. ( 

Pab. '-'" Several of the new fellows ;>■•■ 
-.-••ii .it Lynwood and the) -till think that 
i In- few who name in i In- second semester 
.■ire ioini to settle the man question. 

Feb. 21 Chip Smallwood vi-it- the An- 
nex i ften for a married man 

Feb. 22 Chrietoffel, Wiggenaand Dock- 
er vi~ii iln- and tin- mattress factor) i- 
. .\ ei --i ocked. 

Dawaon naea iln- quick change system 

of changing oollara. Luck) ii had not l 

turned before. 

Feb. 23 No noise at iln- Hall for dinner! 
Tin world i» surely ooming to an and. 

Feb. -1 Frogner likes ohairs made for 
two. Sr-e the remains in the upper hall 
..! i he i rade buildintf. 



I.i.i tfets sixteen pages of boll-out from 
Gi Iffith. But « hat «ii.i Griff tfet? 

l-'.-ii. 2& Stuart Sohaefer joins the squad 
of Fuaaera. I- he tfointf to follow in the 
footsteps of his brother? 

Feb. -<> The morninil mail brought n 
look of fair pink hair to the Sixth Street 
Club, addressed to Kogood and Worse. 
Qoodnough and Morse. 

Feb. 27 Misses Knapp and Maynard 
have friends from out of town. They are 
,i- \.-i unidentified. 

Feb. 28 Mi. Rogers reads the Stout 
Annual '■- his Bible. 



Dresher appeared one da) In the Library 
with iii- hat on. ll<- waa requested to 
lake ii off luii refused aa hi- hair waa not 
combed. Mr-. Ilahn Insisted, but he 
again refused. <-i<-.. «-ii-.. «-i «-. Finally to 

I- p peaoe in the family he took ii off and 

then Mr-. Il.ilui remarked. "That ii lookod 
,i- liomi :i- necesaai v." 

Mr. Buxton i ••Tin- bars «ill i»- down 
considerable "hi- week." 

<>, B. I-.: "I thought that this «;>- an 
educational institution hm I duces Mr. 
Buxton thinks il muet be either a oow pno- 
ture or a prison. 

If any one wants to have ■ little fun ;i-k 
llaael Choslc) wh) the hammock broke 
down. 

There i- onl) goina 1 to be on.- pa 
l his Annual. B. B. 

LCADi Tnt SMCM6 Wl'H* ^C«a»fl«W£rt 



, 








s 



v* 










indrcd-Sbtty-Threi 



CHlsmilH.? 



Maarcli Calendar 

March 1 Count l>. seen on the flat-. 

March ..' The roller rink opens. 

March '! Mi«- Phillip* i- -••■■n with 
Primary Handwork materials. 

March 1 Mr. Brown Joins th« Gawkera 
Club at I tlO i>. ■••. 

March 5 Jotter tfoea i«> the roller rink 
rather than 1 1 » «• movies. Cit] Tournament 

March 8 More Tournament. Stoul 
takes third plaoe. Bankey attends), not 
alone. 

March ' Brunkow draws the "Annual 
Office." 

March 8 ll«-lk demonstrates "the alido" 
to Berniee s.. Edna W., and frienda. 

March '■> Overheard En W I working 

< 'litm: 

Inatruotor. "But Mr. . that ia not est- 
actlj Miiiiiri- on the «••! ii«-. otherwise ii would 
make a tfood piece of work." 

Reply. "1 fonfot which shop I wan in 
and allowed draft*" 

March 1" Joseph Prude's Sunday . 
Walk- home after breakfast. 
Walk- to room nnd drn mw i for dinner. 
w .ilk- home Jiiin in. 
Returns at five o'clock. 
Lunch at -i\ o'clock . 

Si roll- 'till 8:30 ? . 

March 11 Kutli .1. makes .i "No-pes" 
but Dora t "■■ "1 lowells." 

March 12 Tre a a. Friday morning, "Haa 
anj one tfot an) thinrf to eat?" 

March 1"! Miaa L'rfela gives a party for 
i ha Ten. 

March II Mr. Ray and the Hurley 
Davidson representative dine at the Hotel 
Royal. 

March 1.1 Myrtle Caves suspects ■< :■>* 
in her > i 

March 1« — A suggestion made. 
March 1? The fir-t isaue of i he Daily 
New - appears. 

March I s - Myrtle Cave- -n-p.-ct- an- 
other ral or the same nil B| 

March l'.t Unth calls up Hilton. 

March -•' Uor-t and Merren make hand 
axes. 

March 21 Mi— McCauley, "Sash< 

being worn thi- •.I'lisim on hat- and un 1 
very appropriate for >omi'j uirl-." 

Bright Student. "Mi-- Lcedom haa one 

on her new luit.*' 

March T2—A definite promise made. 
Miaa Leedom falls and mops the floor with 
her e>e. 

March '.'.'t Dorothy R. asks about the 
rirown roast, from a beef. 



March »'l Fleenor defines cleaning op 
the brick -hop a-: A pr<»-e— shirked by 

many, carried out hy few. anil dreaded hy 

all. (In (hi— Talks. 
Manh 26— A time set. 

(iilherl Heal- tin- Ihiik-Ii on a dime. 

B ee n In the lower hall. ••Help the Blind." 

Man h 26 Btenerson walk- five blocks 

with two lilrls. Induhfca En peanut- the 

entire distance but fails to pa— them. 

March 27 Ralph Page haa a friend \i-it 

him from Mankalo. Tin- truth i-. -he 

came to take him home. 

March 28 Schaefer |{oea to ahuroh. 
His mother took him. ) 

March T.> Haaae recovers from the 
effect- of the dance at North. 

March 30 Some of us work on our 
i heals. 

March 81— All arrangements complete. 
Iti-lk buys a new knife. So did Gilbert. 

April 'Cale:u£la:r 

April 1 April Pool. Nothinv: happened 

todaj . 

April 2 Tin- ohemistrj of some of the 
I). S. Students Ea lacking. Did you know 
ih.it vinegar would out castor oil? 

April .'{ it I1 1 ii Pool receive- .1 package 

from home. 

April 1 Annex girls tr> to feed the 
"Printer'a Lice." 

April "» Wiggcn join- the fussers rank*. 

April is Print shop squad work- over- 

t ime. 

April ' Berenice Hell haa •> caller. 

April 8 Alma Miller -ecu With a quill. 

April ■.) -7 he data which the editor has 
requested of the Bus. Mar. has not yet 
been received, but all is well. 
April H» 

"There goes my heart." 

- 
"Ding-Ding-Ditto." 
••( 'he — > -< Sat '" 
"That give* me tin- \\ollie-." 

"I'll net <r i.-ll." 

"lah." 

"I'll choke you." 

The above are a few of the choice one- 

whieh M. s.. the Snap-hot Editor uaea. 

April II Sohotl and Schaefer dry their 
clothe-. Have to -la> in hed after the 

picnic. Don't know what the girls did. 

April 12 A frog \i-il- the Anni-x. The 

Misses Rowlej and Bennett the honored 
ones. 



CJala^&as 



April l.'i — "You en 11 always tell when 
Teas has ;> data the • > i -_■ I > » ii.ii.n-." 

"HOW?" 

"Why, haven't you heard her calling am 
darling to-da) '.'" 

April 11 We heard <i" — ett furniahed a 
pie, to the Newspaper fores laal night. 
I [ydc a aa nbsen i . 

April 1"> Feist discovers hia mistake in 
ii. in:. m on tha li-t for the Eastern Star Imll. 

April 16 Red Sehott and Miss Jonea aeen 
t<>u«' i her again. 

April 17 Faculty-Student baseball 

April l v « .in...- Hoaaon officially opena« 

April 19 Dawson opena hi* mouth to 
apeak but ohandaa l • i — . mind. 

April '.'11 Th« < -liiiiinu .li.h iifl'iiir Bl the 

Annex i- rehashed. 

April 21 Maw M.M.i-i.-r takea hex 

fiimils ..ill for mi airing. 

April 2"J Allium! I*l.i > drSSB reheat ~.i 1. 

April 23 Annual Play. Big*suece — . 
April 24 Wohlera goes fishing. 

April -'."> Did ) ."1 -•-•• i !"■ latest of Mart In 
Lidd] ..ii M ■ ■ i i > at reel ? 

April 26 Loretta Mean) posse. 

April 2? John Glnabaoh and Leon 
walk home from aupper together. 

April 28 Some >•< ua go to Assembly. 
< >i hera go oanoeing. 

April 29 Lunder and French threaten 
to _■■• fussing. 

April 30 Frodenburg makaa ■ monkey 

f.lcc. 



May Calendar 



May 1 Griffith vktits the Annex. 

Ma) .' The Si. .ii.- girls have ■ liking 
for I lidh School boj a. 

NIaj ■'■ Kelton again joina the ranka of 
i ho " i ii~-.i -." 

Maj 1 Ethel Whiting gets « letter. 
No. 125. 

Maj 5 Brinkmann makaa another 
aplaah with lii- oar. 

Maj •'■ Have rou ordered your • 
for Sunda) '■' 

May 7 Junior Prom. Soma stunt. 

M.i> S The editor sleeps* result of the 
Prom. 

May 9 Baaak aeen up the river. Looked 
like ii ohioken hawk. 

Ma) 1" Mildred Ro< k rooks. 

Miis 11 < il.-<- ( 'lui. Gymnasi- 

um or i he i 

Ma) 12 Only two more oenta for the 
Week!) News. 

Miis 13 Sohaei at shaves. 

May 11 Rumors state thai several of 
°ur instructor- have contract* to teach 
I. ui on.' next year. 



May 15 Ray makes preparations for 
killing the Annual Board. 

M.-iy 16 Csual pil-_-riin.ii.-c up Creek. 

May IT Dr. Southwiek ontertalna -t i 
i ha Memorial. 

M.is i"v The Annual Board are packing 
up. TIk- books muat be on 1 1 1«- way. 

M.is tg . I. -illicit.- MoMaatera didn't say 
ii word ill I day. 

M.is jo Tli.- Stingers Quartette report 
onls three viotims this week. 

Miis ,'i One week before exama. Gel 
bus) . ei u > bod] . 

Miiy 22 Steneraon swears "ff fuming 
for .i change. 

Miis 23 Josaie Fredonburg *i_n> up 
with the Metropolitan Stock company. 

May '.'l Picnics during school are 
banned. 

M.is _',"i Did you aeo John White's n.-ss 
girl ii> 1 1"- Annual? 

Miis 26 itiii Bowdlei makes ■ farewell 
class tiilk. 

Miis 27 Belk visits 8th street, but not 

to ML) good -l.s .-. 

M;i> :_■*« Harvey Nelson •_■.-!•» hia dail) 
reminder that In - i- a married man. 

Mas 29 Dutcii Toss ii Cabinet have 
t heir farewell banquet. 

Miis :;u Last meeting of the Y. M. C. A. 

Mjis .'il .Ins ltlnckiiiiiii ssciir*. u white 
xhirl to achool. 

J tm« Calendar 

.tun.- i Thesis presentations in the 
Armory. 

June. Last Assembly. Bvorybod) 

.III except 

June 3 Seniors rehearse foi the big do- 
ings. Juniors pack their trunks. Hurrah! 
Hurrah! I got ;■ Diploma. 

June 1 Farewell meeting of the Gawkera 
('lull. Johnn) Dawson says good-byi 
does John ( "■ insbaoh. 

June •"» Can't write anything today (>■•- 
cause we're gone home. 



~> 







; 









Page Onc-Hundred-^ixty-Fivc 



'Sl&m&'xn'b&'tft 




Z+- ^r~ ^~ -^v^ 



NtQfitt 




Lynus 



Pajsc Oik 



Simrl 'Dtti-a 



1 1 wam'l no whan I was yound; 

\\ .• spoke United States. 
The hobo aland ""- never slund 

Thai on our hearind dratea. 

We uaed in make our meanind plain, 

Km now I ..ft perceive 
I'm vcrj danae, and fail i <• 

"Eh? !>«• you del ma. Btevo?" 
I nek ;i friend mmc questions now. 

And If he fails in note 
The anind olaar, he makes reply, 

"Sure Miko, you've £ol my doat." 

\\ '■■ uaed lo ii«» to bad ut nidhfl 
Whan wearied with the day, 

Hni now we ilini'i i we "1111111 ■ flop," 
Or merel) "liii the hoy." 

Man loel positions lond •■•-" 
\\ inn services laoked demand 1 

Hni now the) don't; tl"' neidhboniMiy, 
"Tin- mini i- moral} canned," 

\\ .■ "ooudh "i>" now, « hare onoo «•• paid, 

Whene're we owed n bill) 
\\ inii' base hall thai our brother* played 

Meana how i" "pall il»- pill." 

Polks "pawned" thinde in thai older day < 
lint now they're "pul i«> soak." 

Ami people uaed to "pass away," 
Km now thej merelj "croak," 

\\ <■ used in 1 nil the sweets of lif«" 
Plain "love" 'twas nwool enoudh, 

Km now, alas, romance ia dead, 
Thaj oall ■" "Stickj stuff." 

We imcd i<> 6a whan time !•» leave 

1 »r had no a i-l« t" staj . 
Km now we don't; we "beal it," 

Or make our "detawnj 

"Pleaao, father, can you spare ■ dime?' 

We .i-Ui-ii in tiinial tonea, 
Kni now it'-, "Old man, come across! 
Goudh up some talklnd bonoa." 

(Com . all yound men are "duya" •>■• "dinks, 1 
And don' I it heal il"' diokene? 

There are i>«> l«idif» any more, 
Itui nil are ruldar "chiokena." 

And should you read " mild reproof 

Beneath tin- poet's scribble, 
I hear you aay, "Go chase yourself !" 

"Fordel Ltl" 'l-li ka Bibble!" 
If Nn;ili with lii- "unabrldded," 

Should oome from lands unknown, 
ll«-'«l l>«- quite lik<- the "Oaark man" 

Who neadad !<• !>■• "shown." 
Before he either understood 

< >i made in- meanind plain. 
Si, basal) has 1 1 » <• world abused 

The offsprind «»f hi* brain. 



WfiffflnicmianoSlB CJaJts 

'Jin cubic centimeters slbumen. 
I drams R II <', II* a . 
226.4 drams <-.i Hai »■■. 
81.8 arum- en i' 

1 dram -V-* 1 .. 

2 cubic oentimetora I . n < . lie 

< I! < II, O,. 

derate albumen until frothy, add K II 
t*4 II4 ••(,. ond continue 1 1 • • • process ••: 
aeration until tho substance baoomes 
riijiil: then add < n "•■ dradually. 

Fold in ilw <"« llio 'Mn, mixed with 
SaCL and sifted four times. Add il"- 
i . 11 i 11 and « 11 C H a if 
desired. Bake l"> to 60 minutes In the 
sterilised mioalmontmoile oake reoeptacle. 
After the cake has risen and bedins i<» 
carbonise slidhtly, cover with ;■ paper 
which li it-, been covered with olein or some 
similar substance. 

This cake ■- ohomienlly pure and will 
surelj withstand the action of all il>«- <li- 
liestivc ordans, both chemical and physi- 
cal. B. I*. 

Passed b) the Pood and Drud Commis- 
sion and the National Board of Oensors. 



This i. nil fnsenni' Almanac 

If we should once pretend 
T<> mention 'ill the lovind onea. 

Our work would never end. 
If \% .• recorded ;ill the smiles 

And nil the lovinij look-. 
We'd have In oul ilii- Annual sliorl 

And write ;■ doxen hooka. 




Page < ►ne-Hundred-Sbuj 




Page < tae-Hundred-Sixty-Eight 

■■anBaaHBDniHran 







it i nit mini :■>. 'ii 



W'Ih-h you're fooling blue and dismal, 

And the future seems abysmal. 

Ami tin- darkness seems i<< fill the world 

with woe, 
There i- one plaoe ! would steer you, 
For there'll nothing ilun will ohet i you 
Like » xi-ii to a game ol good foot ball, 
When your thoughts are suicidal, 
Just I., i in- you're jobless, idle, 
And you iV. I thai love lias beckoned you to 

go. 
You mij find new hope arising, 
In a manner that's surprising, 
Bj the straggle at a game «>f basket ball. 
Ah! there's many a down and out'er, 
\\'ln> has liml his heart made Stouter, 
And has fi-lt the embt rs of ambition glow. 
Till they've burned with old time rigor, 
\\ 'hen he's seen a tale of rigor 
Ami it- \ iii... \ iii .1 game of good base hull. 

A. C. B. 

xni'tt Tlrss-l Stororiiy 

Contrarj to the r u les and regulations, 
f«>r many years ohorishod i.. the hearts 
and minds <>f Btoul Students, Miss Mary 
l. M« redden has orgenixed in our midst, n 

Sorority. An g its prominent mombora 

are i B. .1. Ward, Griderion, Harsh barger, 
Mercen, It. Sohott, Borst, and Brinkmnn. 
We have always from the actions of the 
above named persona, doubted their mas- 
culine characteristics, and are glad to 
learn that the) have been admitted with 

i In- real of the \ g ladies to Stouts First 

Sorority. 



Simii LDaria 



Wanted A burly, beauty-proof, Individ- 
■ml in read meters in the halls. We have 
I... i made ■ oenl iiu- year, Menomonie 

< ins M.i.i ( ... 



'£Lvvr &boni liV 

Do you remember your first vie* of the 
Si. .in Office in the little yellow cottage bj 
the road and the firs! gym dance you 
attended? 

I>i<l >mi over sing "My Bonnie" l«-«l by 
Mr. Steendahl «iiii a screw driver, hoar 
Dint..! Harvey talk about taotV «», m,. 
Buxton discuss the pleasure of the magical- 
Ij Irresponsible spell? To be explicit, « I >« I 
you always respond to the Invitation i«. 
gather at the Memorial on Wedneedaj 

after la? This i- vorj confidential so 

you need not answer. I>i«l you ever «i- 
tend by prox> '.' 

Are you interested In the engagements 

Which have I. i mi lion m-i-il tills yur. or 

are you one of those who watch for the 
notice "8ee Miss Field." 

Can you tell whj Berenioe and Billy are 
always together? Why Hit- Ben sometimes 
goes on a strike, and whj Mr. Gilbert en- 
joys receiving valentines? Whj Mrs. 
Mauthe cannot t «-l I her husband's and 
Alice Plnneo's rubbora apart? 

lii.w about the Junior Prom, are you n 
girl, <li«l you go, did he send violets, hire 
.i oabi «'i wear a dra w s suit and <li<i you 
dance i he Fos Ti ot? 

Do you know Mi»~ l.i-i dora .in.i Case 
l»-iir <i striking resemblance. 

Are you a member of the girls' Gawkers 
Club or are you .i lady? Did you hear 
Parks address 1 1 • « - Senior Class on the sub- 
fool "i men's rights and privileges, and 
did you agree with him? 

Diil you ever step on ji tree trunk the 
one that floats when you crossed the 
plank leading to 1 1 • *- Point and find your- 
self a fow minutes Inter a dripping speci- 
men of forlorn Ii u ir.iiii I x ? 




Ill 'II I"! 



mm imii ■ i i mm mi 



* «» iiwi ii 



lluu.lr. 



IMU yCU^LL TliCit WMT£ 3CCKS f. 







■ \y 



^- : ik£ %£. 



WHO Tilt H£6lMENT7\L BAffD. 

came tc runonomt 




hCloaro 






\ <_AOi£S A 








PftiMARr i7Artowo#?n 



Page Onc-Hundrtd-Scveni) 



I.." 



Sitmi LLhj:^ 



Htoxmry Motw 

Mi-, Ilahn i- (toinrf i" secure " cunurj 

in order to satisfy the queati "Have 

you any birda?" 

••1 want n pamphlet on Divorce." 

"Have you. 'Tin- Dctfoneration «>f the 
famil} ".'" 

••I- i li.- •« >•!.• Waj Out' in'.''* 

•Tin- Cusl of l.ivinii' - i-. elOHC I" I In- 

••\\ oman « ho Spend*. " 

We have two new I k-: "An Ideal 

Husband" bj several S< I. ntudent*. "Aa- 
pceta ••< II. .mm- Rule" b} Mode Batty. 

"i mi will fin. I the pamphlet. "Pajama* 
in the An ii.-x" i.\ B. Van Stratum extreme- 

l> i 1 1 ( . • I . • - 1 i 1 1 u- . 

Mr. Mauthe to ;■ Junior) * * I » • « I you ink.- 
a shower bath* N'.>. -ir. i- there one 

mi— .ini;'.'" _^^^^ 

If ottea 

In writing '«» « • • «- aehool, ploaae uae one 
of theae forma: 

I'll. Si rout. 

Tin- Si rou i Sanitarian. 

Tin- si.mii i School. 

Knapp and Stout Inatitule. 

'I'll.- StOU I I m;i--t il ill.-. 

I'll.- Si. mi Schools. 

Tin- Si. mi Conservator} <>f Bnerdy. 

'I'll.- S..ni\ I n-l il ii I.-. 



6:00 p. in. 

Poet receive* a call from Funny <». 
asking him to attend at a party at l.«mi-«-'-. 

6:20 p. m. 

Friend from Minneapolis call* Funny. 
6:30 p. m. 

Diaappointmonl al the home of Robert 
Poet. Repetition of the Babe Bruce Act. 



Km. i M. io boya hi the table "You 
oan "i fuse m.-. boya. 

Ifadcr Inquire* in Arch. Sketching ;■- 
to whether or not shingle* should be 
plaoed on i li.- i oof. 

Mi—. M. when aaked to plaj i "I would 
iini I don't I » l* « - io -ii over hen on 1 1 » «• 
piano ■tool •■! I alone." 

Bverj student i- .i little alcana boiler 
wiili -i. - ; im always up. sii on the safctj 
valve and BANG u«m-- the i>oil.-r. 

E. K. io K. M.: ••Don't >i.ii think you 
could learn to love .1. I*.'.'" 

B. M.i "No. I couldn't." 

.1. I'.: "Whj not?" 

K. M.i "Because I ■ !«>." 



to i — = 




i TTTtlM TOR ED KMD THE. LOBl 



Zimmerman made n pair of dumb bell* 
and *howed them toOruborl whoaaratched 
lii- head and -.ii<l. "Wall, they ware aup- 
poaed io be twin brothera. but Ihej look 
more lik<- father and eon to me." 

A Deck oi Cards 

lliuli Margaret Sohlichter. 
I...« Kllen Winkley, or Pries} Adam*. 
Jack of Heart* Abraham inderaon. 
Queen of Hoarta The "Stinger* of Men" 

Quartette. 
Game Everybody ■ alwaya. 
A pair of Kings Daw* on and Zillraan. 
\ pair of Acea Red ai <l Black Schotta. 
Full Houhc — <"lui«.-- on Fridaj and Sniur- 

day ii i tilt tM . 
A Run Annual Board the day the Annual 

. . III.-- Ollt 

The moat dreaded letter Dunn 
The brightest Ray 
The beal guide l.«- dom 
The highest i>;ii«l employee <it tin- 
Mo....- Baker 
The woral bucker Brunkow 
The noisiest Mauthe 
The mo*t biblical Phillip* 
The aoarcoat thinii in town Ilmn-k 



>nv- Hundred - 




IRaiailttilsirs 




1 1 *•. oven ii.ui: . i ..M - 

fiih-mi - in .1 (inn,,-. 



to cxol lange oon> 



Droving and Design— By URS, II Mix 

Choice Clippings 

One evening Miaa Jeaaie Predenbur was 
trying to persuade Mum Loodom to allow 

her to go i«> .1 dance. 

"Hiii," said Miaa I... "You were out to 
one donoe last night ." 

"Yea, but Miss loodom," begged Jessie, 
"I «iih home early. Why, l wan in bed 
end aaleep when I heard you oome in." 

Mr. Gilbert entered the Monte and naked 
if lobster waa aerred there. 

"Certainly," repliod the waiter, "Sii 
right down. Beefsteak or pork ehope?" 
Il<- put on the rollers .11 soven 
But long e'er the clock had struck 'levon, 
Ilia feet the) were flying 
Am if i hey were 1 1 
To Ui<-k out the bluo dome "f HeaTen. 

One of the moat oxaoting of Stout ljirl- 
desired one dej to obtain the keys to the 
Silo kitchen booauaa of nimiaani j work to 
be done i hoi >. 

She walked up i<»« small peraon working 
in the back yard and aoooated him in this 
manner. "Hey, kid, have you got the 

ki'\ »?" 
The ki«l lifted hi« head. It was Mr. 

S.-\.ui.t! 



I), s. Junion "Mow would you make 
out ii dietary fur ■ pnumatie patient in 

an iii~.iii.i-.ni in m'" 

"Sto ckin g s ?" -ni«l th« salesman, "Yo« 
ma'am. What number do you wear?" 
"What number" ■napped Miaa M. W. 
••win two, of oourae, do you take me for 
.1 ora i ipede?" 

Miss Baker springa ■ quia in Phyai- 
olog) • 

Miaa Plummer soiling ■ sheet <>f paper 
"Ma j I have another ahoet?" 

Miaa Babooes to Miss P. "Bring me ■ 
comforter, I'll need It." 

"All thing* oomc t<> in- « ho waib*" 
But here's ■ rule that's sliokeri 
The iiiiin win. goo* for what ho wants 
Will del it that much quicker. 

••! wonder how man) men will be made 
unhappj whan I marry?" said our girl, 
Miaa B. P. 

"Qow man] do yon expect to marry?" 
annwerod her dearest friend. 

Hill reading "Here i- a wtorj about 

ymi." 

Art I.. "About me?" 
Hill. "Yoa, it i- entitled, "Description 
of ii Nut." 

Bob Poet "I hoar Gilbert made several 
mistake* . ■■ five flats, playing al aaeembl) ." 

Gene Roberta "That's nothind. I've 
made aoveral mistakes in one fiat." 

Mr. Bike deairea to know which oould be 
argued down drat, ■ lady paychology 
teaohei . "t | . . 

In Pood Stud) "Do they f I bab) 

Oalves two year* old on a milk diet?" 

Mr.Steinke "Success comea in eana. If 

you can do It, you will <h> it. If you 
oan'l \ on w ill ." 

William Bike was highl) elated when 
hi- name appeared laat fall in the Dunn 
County Mown a- a I), s. student. 

Bradahaw i» afraid to sleep alone awaj 
from home. 

Mr. Hager — i ■ t down one da) i>> olement- 
arj woodwork olaaa ami perched his fi-«-i 
on a table. 

Mr. Cumin Keod a foot stool, Mr. 

.... 

linger fnil<*<l i<» respond and Mr. Curran 
said, "Gel the point, Mr. Hager? 

We'll all gel our feel on the table and 
then we'll begin class. Hager f«-l I. 



ine- Hundred-Seven ty>Threc 




Don't 'W^igc? ih',.: You* Pictuarss will XSoi Appeal 

is Aiismsi'J 




ic-Hundred-Sti 



lisinitidsars 




Ask Hot 

II. i- i".k •- vv.i- flushed. The breath ...in.- 
from between I «-r moist, parted li|>- i" 
short, tremulous :-.i-\>-. Her lipa and 
slight I) distended nostrils quivered ptiea 
i. •■!. ii.ly. Her whole bod) trembled with 
.-in.. 1 1. .11. Slowly, c« r e w ind. tenderly 

yicldind. -'"• surrendered herself i<> the 
■trond, oubttretehed imw, How strond 
.mil proteotind i li«- broad book! How 
•turd) the led* which eupported It. Breath- 
[nd softly, she plowed her eyelids, her 
mind eoarind Into the iir«-.-i i realm <<< the 
subline. How reatful was ilii- real aftei 
.i lond hard ran for hereidhl <.'<-l«.«-k elaae. 

Adapted. 

Pound in ili«' Annual lt«>\. (Hand 
writini ■ ) familiar. 

Please put ilii* under M- W'a. name. 
This i- ;i Senior «iili minnj hail 
And dimplea thai beguile. 
\\iili roaj oheeka and pearl) teeth. 
\ii.l an evei ready —in ■ !«-. 



Question b) agitated Senior; Where i- 
Misa Rut led lie? Has eny one Men her? 
I)...-- nnybod) know what hei office hours 
are? 

Answer bj chorus: sin- has "•• office 

hours, i>ni find Miss Irwin, wail .i sec I 

and Miss Rutledde will appeal without 
fail. 

The class i" Peycholod) were discussind 
the terms "Idncoua hiaion." After the 
explanation some one asked) 

"la the .-mill roall) molten on the Ln- 
side, Miss McPodden?" 

"The) sb) i< Is. I don't know. I've 

Mr. Buxton; '*(".ni you prepare such ■< 
Irsson plan thai rontnins all 1 1 .«■-»« ■ things? 

Mi. Ilillix: "I probabl) could if I spent 
aa much time an you and Mi Rodders .il.l 
cookind these thinds up." 

Someone wondered when the) were 
to boil ii dow ii. 

M r I !illi\ in M T. t'.i. till ) in.-- i 
This I hind " f havind Seniors write lesson 
plans i- lik.- teachind our wives to drive ■■ 
■ mil. We i«-.nli them •" hold the hnmmei 
wiilt both hands in order to avoid hittind 

I !:.il fi 

Miss MoCalmonl In Pood Chemistry 
Class, after openind the window i "If 
any • >( you i" the back ••' the room del cold, 
elide down the window." 

A question Mian Glanton would likv to 
have answered: "Was Joseph's <-...ii an 
evenind coal oi .i rroek ooat'.' 

Miss Mil Salmon i ussidns 

Now f..i i arrow we will 

starch. ! shall expect you 
:il... ui ii. the nature of differ* 
.1. There are tome ovei 
kinds. 

Miss MoCaulej .... Monday: "Girla. I 
vs. mi .ill > ..ii i- knittind In • •> Thursday." 

Miss Mil', on Thursday: "Girla, your 
knittind is due next Tuesday." 

Mum Mil . on Tuesday: "I wan I your 
knitted articles .ill handed in bj " week 
from Wednesday, and i> you wan I an) 
credit, don't fail <•• put the num 
your section on ii- Your name isn't so 
important." 



n I.-— ..ii : 

talk about 

. kll..« :lll 

ii varieties, 

i i Ii.. ii-. in. I 



\\ .in i.-ii \ place i" meet • 
Board. 



The Annual 



ma) be dlstinduished from wo 
in iv».. ways: 
\i..l;i Their step i- lidhter. 
Mr-, y And their voices louder. 




'l-'-Li^s Any Plteiee 





MOGL fi£W ANIMAL TCYS THAT. M.T. STUDE.NT3 CAN MAKL. 



I dreamed a bil the other ■> iut> i . 

A i hlntf ' rarely <l«>. 
For you'll adree with me, I'm rare, 

Thej sold lo oome true, 

I stood within an empty hall 

Bealdo 8t. Peter'a tlir.nn-: 
In nil the vaat, dim-lidhted plaoe 

\s ere he and I alone. 

Tvraa atrandcly like A— i mbly Imll, 

Save in 1 1 1 > dream thai nidhl 
The Muni and I were on the atade, 

No fni-nlt J in -i-_-lit . 

And than I heard b deafening wound 

< >f marobind feel wlthouti 
And horde* of student* filled the hall 

Willi thf uniform* of Stout. 

The way the) orowded In the Bladen 

WouM make it really aeem 
Thai ii u- in t Aaaembl) 

In 1 1 » «— peculiar dream. 

St. Peter roae and than it aeemed 

It wa- the laal dreal daj : 
And thla a judgment meetind. 

At t he pari ind ol t he « aj ■ 

\n andel sen an 1 brot .i pile 
of volume* to 1 1 • « - Saint; 

And whan I MW t i t •■ ■ r title* brief. 

1 ihoi I'd rarely faint. 

Twaa •• \u ii aabi " ju"! "Annuals," 

And one for ever) yeari 
Willi bindinda, dot ii or leather 

a- the pookot>booka would bear. 

••I »i«li to 1 1 in •> k you." said tin- Saint, 

"Siout studenta, one and all, 
For tlii- nioe pile of "Annuala" 

Hare waiting for your oall." 

•■"i ou've been moat thorough In your work 

Mot hind eeoaped your eye," 
Hi- turned the ruetlind pad 1 

\\ it Ii aomcthind like a sidh. 



"To enter you upon m) book* 

I ni'\ er ■.,!« i he need • 
I'll read your record from your book 

And pray thai you take I d." 

Il<- quiokl) read of thia and that, 

The musty volume throudhi 
And ilnv, some shrewd decision* 

I-Vom the kodak section* too. 

And one by one with saddened mien 

Paaeed from m) wonderind view, 
Until a acant one dozen folk 

W ere left of all lliat in- . 

"And « ho are you?" Sain) Peter raidi 

■•w ho, out of -di that thrond 
Dare aa) you've lived the life at stout 

With no recorded wrond?" 

••<)li Sir. «.- .ii.- the editor*, 
Thoudh tempted to tronsi 

Out lime Mraa filled with lalifiriiii; 
To del our -lieet to |ir. — ." 

So eaid the apokeaman timidly. 

A man. who tliouijli lie tried. 

Could not, beoauae of atature, 
Behind the other* hide. 

St. Peter'a faoa drew ver) -tern 

" "I'i- m> tiTrnwr. "ti» true. 
Km since you have no other, 

I duaaa 'twill !<-t you Lhroudh." 

II.- i.-ii them off in triumph 

And aa they paaaad from vie* 
I hoard him any, "You'll find Imddo, 

A fell,., two." 1$. M. ('■. 




/c* s,tcut 




OOQQQ 




fill 



\ 



PaotOM 



Ity-Elght 



lwft,T»* Prodigy Dtsoovawtd 

A f ii i r vniinu pod. who ijivi-n proiui-.- ..I 

greater thinifa tooomti haa been recently 

(li-nnilill ill l.\ iii-imkI Hull. \\V -lllllllil 
ll«T fir-l . 1 1 t a - 1 1 > | > 1 in:iii\ fliiilitH of faiu-\. 

Twaa i In- uiiiiit before Christmas ami nil 
thru the Hall 

Thfl Lyiiwiind liirln i-airii-il trunk li.i\. 

l.n •_■•• iiikI hiiiiiII. 
Their atookintfa ihey pai-ki-il in their nnnU 

Ml i I li ureal i-an-. 

T«> tiiki* liiiini' i<> mothar f«>r her to repair. 
I ii.nl fuel -.-i i led down in my bed f«>r n nnp- 
When someone exclaimed* "Did I hoar <■ 

rap'.'"' 

Tin* teaoheral The teaoharal \v«»r«l conn- 
up I Ik- slnir. 
I foil on kn.-i-- mill offered a prnyi-r. 
M> room how it iooki-ii with it* bundloa 

and books, 
My olothee on the Qooi Not ■ dreaa on 

t In- In . ..i>-. 
I jrelled to my room matoi "We nutl clean 

up thia room — 
<.. rou lii-t the dual pan and I'll «S«»t the 

broom." 
Wi- Hwi'iii iiml we ni raitfhtened jimiI made 

»iirli it olal ter« 
Thai the tffarb down below ua Baked what 

waa • he mat ter? 
(>nr oallara aoon l«»fi, for they juMi oame to 

I. i.l ... 

A right royal uim.iI time anil H'-'i-r iiiii-i- «li«l 

I ln-\ . Iiiili- ii-. 
Ah ho m i- wrap|M'll up presents, tlinuiilil 

rami- like a iIjimIi — 

Perhapa 'would i..- bettor. i>> oounl op our 

oaah 
Ami then -nil. a BtULneaa, one oould e'en 

iii-.i. >i a eriokel i 
Ah thej thought of the ooel of their own 

railroad ticket* 
wi..-.. thia matter waa aettled and we «Sot 

in to OUr beds. 



And pulled the alim oovera up ovoi oui 

I.i-iiiIm, 
The houae wan ho qulel excitement wm 

alack, 
When up wailed the eontf, "I want i" go 

back." 
Such a horaeaicky feeling oame over me 

then, 
I turned oul the lighta and wound up BiiS 

Kin. 
I fi-ll aeleep dreaming of the Friday to 

lollll-. 

When i h<- "Dinkej " we'd take ami go home 

on I In- run. 

Little hfiaa Mary Atfnea Bcaa. 



Ank Dim- Iliiaik i.l.oul buying tlcketa for 
tin- football team to Ban ('lain-. 

Ona of our Junior girla aenl ■ peal card 
piii mi- of the [naane Aaylum to a frh-ml 
and aaid thai waa where a groat mans of 
the Stout girla atayedi 

sin-: "I don't aae ho* Ihoac Juniora 
«-an keep their little oapa on thaii heads." 

Miaa Mi-K.-nlili-i. : "Vacumn pressure." 

The clocks ought to atop striking and go 

on n hi riki-. 

Ii'h easy enough to laugh at die other 

fellow hut com. !.. .i -purl laugh at 
yourself. 

Mr. Brown to Halveraom "You could 
-i-i- ji will. I... open eye." 

When Mrs. 1 1. iii H wiim aaked if aha hml 
i-M-r l. ml her picture taken, aha muil. 
"No welli yi-H, i in. it one bul yon could 

not iihi- it for the Annual." Think of tlinl 
Hut. well, you ran see what happened. 

Mr. Ballngei i- -•■ fond of pi that In- often 

makea the boya ahare their*. 

Leal fall hi-vitiiI II. s. boya were called 
in to install a special length bed at Lyn- 
wooil Hall for Miaa Kroipke. 



r — 




i >'■.•• i <•> ni .1 < 1 1 1 n 




ine-HundK&Elghty 



Till. I.VA7 1/. \KKI\ ES 




Norma Froelich 6ave up hoi work 

with ilia- I < i ■ 111. n. .11- in it I <-r in I ill. .ml 

1 1 ia- fii-»i a if April, owind to ill healt h. 
Mi — Froelich Ii.-hI mil oomplotcd 
her plana and the work waa taken 
nvaT by others »i ilia- Annual 
Board. We retfrel the faol thai 
Mi— Froolioh oould not finish the 
work so well bodun. 



Criitliig ixtiin She iJioxiioiilo 

15. -,ui ll l: in ininal I In- unlink- wliia-li 

were heard Issuing from ilia- throats a.f 
ilia- half ■ hundred fan* and ilia- five 
fanettea pres en t, we have attributed i !•«- 
downfall <>f ilia- Faculty ia« the following 
faetai Thai they fordo! ta. furniah the 
diamond with a "standard bubo" plate 
for Mi. Steondahl; the inabilitj of Mr. 

Jarvia i<. "p id ii out"; Mr. Grodorson'a 

failure i a • allow fan- "ahrinkade" on 1 1 • «• 

..ill when iii l>;ii: ii misinterpretation of 

"what ilia- pupil now knowa and oan now 

.I.."* by Mi- Roddera; and, laal but not 

l.-.i-l. ilia- lack "f "OO OP tiam" Im-- 

: \» .-.-ii the Facultj and 1 1 1 •- water-boy Mr. 
ii.i.k k and il>a- Umpire, Mr. Steinke. 
Special mention ahould be made «>f • I • «• 

-pi-al nan l:ir atop | > n I l.-t I off li> Mr. 'I'll..-.. 

Chriatoffel while acting in the oapacitj of 
■• Base Km i>i re. 

Otto \* . aaid that (•«• had ■ mahodany 
rase named Quan • • - • . 

Jane Donham haa aeveral favorite ea> 
prpaaiona audi .i- "Oh, my -mil." 

Mr. Borat r>ji>-: ••I'll tell you, that 
Meroen i- ii tfood man. I think In- will 
del almoet aa tfood ■ j« >l » aa I will." 

Mr. y.iiitti.in went t «■ ohureh and waa 

told publioly lluil In- «ii- lln- a. illy ill. in 

w in. did not aind* 

II. II. in praotiee olaaai "Johnny, what 
in memory?" 

The ladi "The thind I fordel with." 



nxs-1 Mssitucj vi the Oxcjaiilzsdl 

Season promise to be • ' ruahind a»n«>. 

Beoauae <>f the ever inoreaaind number 
..f fuaaera ii beoame necoasarj for tln-m to 
ordanhte iIi.-hi-.-Im-- Into .■ National 
Society. Nowhere, it f safe in nay, nra> 
tin- appUeanta i"<>r memberahip more 
mi in. i.. ii- than here in Btoul Institute. 
Ever} da) 1 1 ••• ranks are drowind- A' 
present tin- roll aif thia Society ahowa the 
followinda 

Fas) Class \\ . Comatook, Minn K. 
Geisler, L. Hovlid, Glnabaoh, Briokson and 
Dheim. 

Blow Class Berdi Bohade, M. Mnolin, 
Itnlvereon, .1. Daane, Hahn, Zillman, 
Blum. I I..I in and M. MeKeon. 

Verj Blow Class. Blaokman, Gold 
Ma thy, B. ("lurk. I.. Kandas, <;. Condie, B. 
Heller, Stouerwald, It. Chiokerind and F. 
Zeidler. 

Refrainers French, Prisk, Mi— Gorby, 
Klka-. Anna- Hull. M. I'liijar ami Sliinliiii. 

"Cat Pay" 

Van Stratum Stindera a.f nil men. 

Bi in • 

M. .1.1 itilltv \\ ll> al.aa- nlla-V 

Mildred Millor. W by? 

K. Whiliiiw. Walt fair yann .iii-\».i. 

sJupplles Ji yailsi'bls at Stout 

Cole fraim M in na--ait ll. 

Rloo lond slender drains. 

Graham plump, well filled -ink. 

I ).n Iuiiii nil waia.l mill ii yard wide, 

A pair a.f Garters duaranteod "«• <"• t any- 

thin::. 
Whitlnd it will nuika- iin\ a |ili-\i..n 

perfeot • 

\\ illi-iiill -\M-a-t a illa-r. 

Mi— (iliiiiimi advises one never to o h a n dc 

her mima- null--- lln- iniiii-li-r i- ma--a-n t . 

i.a-i ii- hope -in- advised ua for the i"--t 
inn 1 with experience oudht to l>a- ■ ii« >« >«l 
advisor. 

Miss Glan ton reoeived one propos al that 
we know of ii waa from i>ii apple man. 



Page One-Hundred-Elgfaty-One 



'We Ars P-roud oi These 




ri/$b tlcC /fL mokTS J^i S Ti LLe.-ry 





^M fltKilliq 







TntrTENonirf egg-beatelcl. 

SWflME.fi SCHOOL IS SCENE OF t/loUEfcff 
W*TEk SPORT S 






S. S. FORCING 



Page One-Hunditd-Blghty-Two 

■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■ 



mi nil inn 




ES[Uj 




Ahmml ISdi-io^s i x Jo*& 



YEAR bj year as 1 1 1 « - Stout Annual make* its appearance we li<>i" - that 
it suggests i<» ii^ readers development and growth, We hope the school 
itself has grow n during the i > - *— - 1 twelve months and that its influence has 
been stronger rind better than before. Beyond tlii*. however, we hope 
iluii the year has l>een one in which everj Alumnus has developed ad- 
ditional strength in his work and is exercising .< more powerful infhience 
for good liiun !><• has in the past. 

Keeping in touch with one another and with the sol I ought to help 

and inspire everj one w I", has been ;i student ;>t Stout. Thru correspond- 
ence and visiting; ilini ili<- Hchool bulletins and the school paper; thru 
the Annual and Alumni organisations ««■ ought t<> continue »<» build up 
i strong* co-operative force, the influence of which shall !><• felt thruoul 
the ITnited States. V\*c ought i<> know and feel that there !•» such ■> pro* 
gressh ■• force and in order i<> receive our share of t !>«• benefits which should 
come from such .1 source we -»ln>nl<l "plunge into the current" and make 
known our identity \\itli such a bod) of young men and women. In other 
words, ii we take occasion i<> \i>.it our Alma Mater when possible, or \viii<' 
.1 good letter i«> the school, i«> an instructor, or i<> the Annual Board i« will 
profit both the writer and the readers. 1 1 will help to keep alive the mutual 
interest between school and students which i- essential t<> growth and 
progress. 

The Alumni Editor of the 1915 Stout Annual i> well pleased with the 
spirit that has been shown by the many who have contributed t<» this 
department. On account of limited space we are obliged i<> omit several 
■_:.><>( I articles. 

Ever} Stout graduate « li<» reads 1 1 1 » — ~ Annual should '»«• on 1 1 » « - alert 
for some material for next year and let »•> kno^ you have it before we ; 1 -K 
for It. This will encourage those in charge of the Annual work. 

We 1 :■ k«- this occasion i<> thank each >»i" you for the material you have 
furnished, and wish you prosperity for the coming year. 

FRED L. CURRAN 

Alumni Editor 



A Sjio'iih A'lnmm D^cjsmiassriitmV 



TT is inspiring to live neighbor to a great and efficienl organization of 
■*■ ;u>\ character from which ;■ powerful influence pulses rorth, especially 
if that influence i» in the direction <>i* progress. Ii in interesting i<» follow 
thiit throbbing life i<> its source and examine ii carefully i<> see wherein 
lies its might) force and efficiency. 

Perhaps no better example of such an organization can !>•• found among 
educational institutions than > 1 1 « - University of Wisconsin. It is not my 
purpose t<» eulogize it it has its faults, aa all human organ izutions have — 
but we cannot doubt its powerful influence. However, i' is not its influ- 
ence, l>ut rather the source of thai influence in which I am interested ;it 
t he present i ime. 

I am convinced after being an eyo witness of much of its life for two 
years, that the real source of its growth in efficiency and influence is its 
alumni. They are loyal everywhere and all 1 1 1 « - time: ;it home-coming 
time, and between times; t<> themselves and t<> each other; t<> their alumni 
association and bo to their Alma Mater. It is thai loyalty thai is illustrated 
so patheticalh w hen the "old grad" comes bach ;<t home-coming time and 
totters "nt t«. see the great game. 

It is shown in 1 1 » « • waj tin- alumni and their association "get into the 
game*' in any movement for the advancement of Alma Mater. The reason 
for their loyalty is so plain that it seems hardl} necessary '■• st;it«- it : ti,,-> 
see that the growth of the University's influence means growth in their 
own influence. They saw it from the beginning and ><> they have grown 
toget her. 

Maj I now call your attention to ;■ parallel and an opposite. Stout 
Institute has grown to have ;> powerful influence in its particular field. 
Her graduates are occupying positions of more or l<-ss importance in Manual 
Arts and Domestic Science all over the United States and her Insular pos- 
sessions. Men and women rrom ;■ large number <»i* states are attending 
tin- regular and summer sessions. Dr. Harvey's advice is constant!} 
sought : and his counsel has weight in all of the great councils of Industrial 
Education. But an Alumni association, live and active in its support of 
Stout in helping to extend her influence, is conspicuous by its absence. 

I am hoping that we may bring about a real awakening among Alumni 
of Stout. Is ii not a good time to start ;i live Vlumni asso« iation? Let's 
have one that will live and grow in influence with Stout one thai will 
(insist, in even legitimate way, to promote 1 1 » « - interests and influence of 
stout Institute. [ am very sure that Pros. Harvej would welcome such an 
association. Although I have consulted no one in this matter, I am quite 
sin-,- that «h<- majority of Alumni would be glad to assist in making ;i 
success of such a movement. I am sure that it would result in much 
mutual profit. 

May I suggest that ;i meeting be called for the purpose of inaugurating 
such an association, ;it some convenient date during the coming summer 
session. !.«-t"s have an Alumni association with its resident Executive 
Secretary ;it Stout, its annual home-comings and all of the rest. 



Mudison, Wis. 



A. .F. F().\. »13. 



mr- Hundred-Eight 




£Iiso:n Mamial 'i^iriiricj £te!hool 

*■ I Mils being but the second year in the history of the Hixon Manual 
■*- Training School, wo Feel thai we have dona ourselves proud in the mat- 
tar of putting tin- work on n oommerical l>;isis. inasmuch ;is tin- courses 
are made to conform i<» t he local industries. The work in all of the depart- 
ments is given with t li«- intention of bringing the students i<> realize the 
relationship of the shops and drafting rooms i<> the Factories, offices, and 
other lines of business in their immediate vicinity. 

We have been broughl i<> 
realize the excellent oppor- 
tunity offered in tins direction 
in the making <>f apparatus 
and furniture for the city 
schools. This not only arouses 
interest and enthusiasm upon 
the part of the student, but al 
the same time is a boon •«> tl>«* 
school board from an economic 
point of view. Among the larg- 
est attempts along this line of 
work was the construction of 
fire escapes for the city schools. 
This work was done by Sopho- 
more boys. Another under- 
taking was the making of forty-two drafting benches for the drafting <!«•- 
partment. This afforded an opportunit) for 'li<- correlation of the wood 
and metal departments. Still another attempt was the making of pat- 
tern and casting of a bronze tjil)l«-t for the La Crosse Twentieth Century 
Club, which weighed nearly -•"><• pounds. 





| Pane One>Hundre<URighLy-Six 

= mil 1 .mint 1 jiiiii nun in in mi 1 nun iimi nun ;u ■ 




Among the projects constructed for use in the city schools were furnace 
grates, play ground and gymnasium apparatusi superintendent's roll 
top desk, t<>«>l cases for high school office, shop cabinets, ,4 Firs1 Aid" 
cabinets, and free hand drawing standards. An outside feature of our 
drafting department is the making of |xi>icrs, c;iriooiis, lantern slides, 
and other forms of advertising for tin* school activities. 

One of the important changes of the current year was tin- organization 
of three Junior High Schools. Mechanical drafting and bench woodwork 
are given in these schools. We find thai this change in our curriculum has 
tended i<» increase 1 1 1 «- percentage of grade students entering the Inch 
school* 

"Nothing too good*" is our motto and with thai aim in riev we antici- 
pate brighter prospects for coming years, Our present Manual Training 
teaching force consists of -i\ "Stoutsi" and we hope to add another for 1 1 » « - 
coming year. 

La Crosse, Wis. ('. I). BROWER, '13. 



'*I J iie Jirmoj: 'High School In Dssmcjs 



ORANGE is situated at the fool of the Orange Mts. and a three-fourths 
of nn hour's ride from lower Broadway, New York City, the business 
ctiiicr of th<- world. Orange is the center of the hat manufacturing sec- 
tion of this country and it is also the home of Edison Phonograph Works. 
Near here are located other large manufacturing concerns Worthington 
Pump Works, Westinghouse Company, General Electric Works and many 

others. 

According to an Investigation of the occupations of the parents of chil- 
dren attending school in Orange, it was found thai they were grouped in 
order of numbers as follows- hatters, machinists, and business men. An- 
other report disclosed the fact that a larger number of children dropped 
out ;ii the end of the fifth and eighth grades than at the end of any other 
periods. A small per cent of those completing the oighth grade ever enter 
t he high school. 

The problem then is. how to prevent the dropping oul al the end of the 
fifth grade and to gel more Into the high school. As the prcs* nl high school 
course offers five distinct lines of work. viz. tenrher's. classical, technical, 
commercial, and scientific, the field in secondary work seems to be pretty 
thoroly covered and our attention is then turned to the elcmen tary school. 
A Junior Hiijh School" of the seventh, eighth and ninth divisions seems 
to he the solution to the prohlem. To carry out iliis phm. the board ap- 
propriated $150,000 for ji central building where all the seventh, eighth 
and ninth grades of the city are brought together for instruction. This 
building contains the wood and iron shops, the cooking, sewing and lunch 
rooms. ;i spacious auditorium, a large gymnasium, besides sixteen regular 
classrooms and a drawing room. 

In oi<ler to make the school bend to the individual needs, the course 
is made very flexible and takes in the following courses: 

1. A eourse leading directly to the academic course of the high school. 



Paw 



J. A commercial course, which will better Tit the pupils t«> take up the 
work in the high school. 

.'{. An industrial course, for boys and girls, which will lead directly t<» 
some useful occupation. 

1. A course for backward, but capable pupils. 

.">. In time a piece of land maj be purchased for agricultural purposes. 

The industrial course is pre- vocational in character in thai the factory 
methods and management are applied i<> the classes as much as the school- 
room conditions w ill permit. The state law of New Jersey requires a mini- 
mum ol si\ and a maximum of seven hours per day, one-half of the time 
t<> be spent in the shop, for all vocational classes. 

The general subjects in classroom work for the boys and girls in the 
industrial classes, are as follows: English, history, civic and social 1 • f«*. 
geography, mathematics, industrial and fine arts, music, writing, hygiene, 
nature stud} . and languages. The work is correlated with the shop and the 
subjects are as closely associated with real life us is possible. 

For the present, cabinet-making will be the principal work of wood- 
working classes. Shelves for storerooms, lockers, cabinets, lunch tables, 
sewing tables arc needed for the school and are i<» !><• made in the shops. 
The electrical and machine-shop work are in great demand by the boys. 
Printing will !>«• added later. The cooking olasses prepare lunches for the 
lunch room, the lunches being disposed of al a nominal sum. 

As the school has been in operation only a short time, there are many 
details to be worked oul and problems to !><• solved. Already a new interest 
has been created and ;■ vital stimulus given to the educational system in 
Orange. Whether all the problems will be solved remains to be seen, but 
I am quite sure that the Junior High School is o great stride forward and 
has come tostaj to form an integral part of our educational system. 



( hrange, N. J. 



OSCAR F. HAAIJ. '12. 



NO doubt a great many of you are looking forward to September, 1915, 
when you will be starting on the line of work for which yon have been 
preparing yourselves to teach during these two years m Stout. Some of 

you no doubt look upon your new work from the monetary viewpoint. 
That is right and natural, but let me offer n few Buggest ions :i- an alumnus 
and also as one who is interested in the Continuation School work of this 

State. 

The Continuation School teachor of Domestic Science must look fur- 
ther than the dollar; she must have a hig humanitarian heart in order to 
be successful in this work. The hours of service are not eight per day for 
fivo and one half days per week, but even after you have put in the required 
time of service each day, before you can feel thai your work is ended for 

the day you will have to take a trip to some poor girl's home where the 
kitchen is the parlor and the SUITOUndings not the neatest. You will 

have to remodel your ideas of table etiquette and good substantial little 
dinners and the most economial ways of serving such with all the acces- 
sories of the average home you have seen, to the conditions described 
above. Now would you teach a girl to cook for a family of eight where the 



>!!••. | il!l»ll<-<l-|-: IKlX > •Right 



father's intermittent income is never more than $12.00 per week? Hovt 
would you advise tlie expenditure of such an income among so many in 
order thai food) shelter, fuel and clothing may l>«- obtained for all. This 
is not an exceptional ease but an ordinary one. Most of the girls we have 
in school are here because they had t«> stop school and help support their 
family. 

Prepare yourself to teach children who will not come to you dressed in 
tho latest fashion, whose fathers do not hold positions of Influence in 
theoit} whose primary aim in life is a j<»l> and some money. It is this 
class of girls you will have to council with and guide. You must not 
despair and say thai you cannot teach them good manners and habits of 
living. They are just a> susceptible to good teaching as their more 
foi i unato sisters. 

[f you come Into this work with the heart of a social worker, one who 
loves the work because of the good one can do you will be contented, other- 
wise you will be disappointed and the unfortunates you come in contact 
with will be still more discouraged with lit'.-, and society will be just thai 
much out. 

ELIZABETH PRATT, II. 

"ITEM I. Y I s;..\ this is;, serious subject. Truly many knoweth not one or 
▼ the other and surely not each In the other. Yea, tho each !><• separate, 
oft goeth they together. With many variations are they combined and, 
again, seen separately, plain and simple. Who knoweth the Importance 
of each and understandeth their workings? Tho many realize that the 
way of the transgressor is hard many arc yet to come. 

Yea, tho discipline !>«• directed toward subordinates and diplomacy 
toward superiors truly the former is at man; times easier than the latter. 
Who is there who denieth the truth that success in the first too often 
depends upon success in the last? II<- who sayeth "Yea" and meaneth 
"Nay" lieth, therefore deceive ye not. 1I«- who barkens not unto his 
superior's orders is a fool and outteth off his own head, lint diplomatic is 
he who controlleth the flow of such orders and shapeth them to his own 
ends. Forsoothe, If one principal tclleth thee to cause thy pupils to 
tread more lightly thru the hulls say, "Aye, aye," and profit by her in- 
structions. If another sayeth to you, "Do you walk on tiptoes? Do you 
want your pupils to do so?" say, "Nay, nay," and profit by her instruc- 
tions. If the statutes say unto thee, "Receive into thy class all children, 
both good and bad, and retain no one o'er the hour more than ten 
minutes," and thy worthy principal sayeth, "Shakcth no one, neither 
whip thou lest I !>«• not with thee when parents object," cover thy face with 
smiles and act, e'er your supervisor deem you a weak teacher. 

Verily I saj unto you be dignified, reserved and impartial to fellov 
teachers. If thou s«-«-st lady friends from the Halls of Learning in the 
evening, knowesl them not by day. If perchance they puss thee in the 
Halls throw high thy head and s.-.-st thou them not. Forget not diplo- 
macy. For gray hairs of 1 become jealous of golden looks and peering eyes 
ami wagging tongues work thee no good. 



tae-Hundrcd.Eighty.Xiae 



Mistake not a true friend, I beseech thee, for he is rare, indood. Beware 
of compliments, lest some one betray thee. !i" some one praise thee ex- 
ceedingly, I teed i hee not, lesl flattery be thy ruin and overworked diplomacy 
thy deceiver. A true friend tellest thee both good and bad. If he tellest 
thee wrong censure him nol for he meaneth well. If thou hearest bad 
concerning thyself oonsiderest thou ii well for truly when the scorner is 
punished tin- simple is made wise, and, when the wise is instructed he 
receivcth knowledge. A true friend guideth you in the use of discipline 
and diplomacy. 

Wise is he who discernest these two things. Great is he who useth 
them wisely without discernment. Yea, he who useth one t<> grind Ins 
axe is clever, but In* who forseeth its approach Buffers nol from delusion. 
He who bringeth fori li right in another disciplines him; he who pleaseth 
with a slick loiiijiK- Init doeth nothing invokes distrust. He who knowoth 
not of discipline and diplomacy falleth in many pitfalls, hut In- who useth 
them wrongfully diggeth them for himself. 

L. C. !>«• WOLF, '13. 



THOUGH we, who have chosen the teaching of Domestic Art and Science 
as oirr v oca tion, have nil taken praotioally the same course of study 
we are not called upon to do the same kind of work, or to tench the same 
• lass of people. It seems i«> me that those of us who have an opportunity 
to work among tin- poorest and most ignorant class are especially favored; 
not only because it is a pleasant feeling t<> know that we are giving our best 
to those who need it most, but because it is an experience «»f the greatest 
educational value. We cannot have a good understanding of or sympathy 
for the poor and ignorant foreigners who come to us until we have worked 
among them and with them. 

Special classes have been organized in Madison, Wisconsin, for the 

Italian ami Russian Jewish girls who are in tin* second ami third tirades 

iu school. They are too old for these tirades but are forced to remain 
there because they cannot read, write, or understand the English language. 
The aim of the work is to tearh the girls the fundamentals of good 
house-keeping ami home-making. First and foremost among their needs 
is a knowledge of persona] hygiene, household cleanliness, ami sanitation. 

The jiirls are not allowed to rook unless they wear clciin aprons, and have 




PaKeOnc-HuiuIrol-Nin.lv 



perfectly clean bices, hands, and finger nails, They are given an oppor- 
tunity t«> "dean up" In school as few have as yet the facilities i<» accomplish 
this feat at home. The aprons which they use in the cooking class are 

the first articles they make in school. They have I n taught ho* i<> 

sweep, to scrub, to dual . and i<» wash w indows. They are now able t<. w ash 
ili«- dishes and to wash them clean; to wash their dish pans, cloths, and 
tow«ls; and to clean the sinks. It was necessary to show them how to use 
soap aiiil scouring powder on the dishes, on the surroundings, and on 
themselves. 

Dirty tho the? invariably are, thej are a cheerful, willing, and usually 

;| g l-natured lot to work with. It is no unusual thing to hear a girl 

sweetly singing an Italian street song while vigorously applying soap and 
brush to the floor. The most disagreeable pari of the work with the 
Italian girls thus far lias been to see the almost undying hatred exhibited 
between girls whose families, < I » i < - to one cause or another, arc at war with 
each other. 

Dm- to their Ignorance of the English language the girls unconsciously 
make many amusing remarks. Anyone or anything of masculine, feminine 
or neuter gender is spoken ol as "ahe." For instance, a girl will say, "My 
pa. she is coming home earl] today." One day a little girl who had been 
busy at tin- sewing machine came to me in great excitement and said, 
'Oh, Mrs. Kramers, the sewing machine won't walk." 

I'p to the present time the -jirls have had sufficient oooking to onable 

them to serve a very simple lumheon. As a prepara lory lesson they were 

given a strenuous course in the simplest rules of table etiquette. As a 

result I hope they will not stand up and reach for the biggest piece of food 
in sight as they did at the praotioe lesson. After this preparatory lesson 
one little girl said to her teacher, "We have a party next week, you are 

COming, ami we must have elean handkerchiefs." Tin- latter made BUOh ail 
impression hecanse a short time ago a handkerch ief was an unknown 

quantity to them. 

The work for tin- rest of the year has been planned to include laundry 
work and household furnishing and decorating of the simplest kind; bo- 
sides a continuation of the work in OOOking ami sowing. The results we 

are working for are slow in coming hut the least sign of improvement i- 

sufficient reward for all the hard work ami many disappointments which 
come. 



Madison. Wisconsin 



GERTRUDE M. KREMERS '13. 



'Will ^hey ®si 2iV 

Act I. Scene 1. 

School Board Rooms. Committ n teachers and Superintendent 

of Schools seated at a long table. 

Supt. (Calling the meeting to order. 

"We have met for the purpose of disOUBStng the appointment of 
a head for our Manual Arts Department. What are your sugges- 
tions?" 



First Member. 

"Weill I tliink shop experience i> the most Lmportanl qualification 
for t hi> posit ion." 

Supt. 

••How much experience would yon suggest?" 

First Member. 

"Five years al least." 

Second Member. 

"And he should have had al least three years experience as a teacher." 

Third Member. 

"And bo a Normal school graduate." 

Second Momber. 

"Yesi that is itj a N'ormal school graduate who has taught al least 
i hree years." 

First Member. 

"But that i>n'i sufficient. He should have taken at least two years 
of special preparatory work." 

Supt. 

"A mere matter of twelve yearn of preparation; not unreasonable 
;it all." 

First Member. 

"Ho should I-- o competent machine and architectural draftsman." 

Second Member. 

"And a carpenter who knows his trade well enough to build a house 
and furnish It." 

Third Momber. 

"Very good, but 1 think he should be a master mechanic capable of 
handling classes in forging, foundry, and machine shop work." 

Second Member. 

"And sheet metal work and bookbinding for they have those in our 
rival tow n." 

Third Member. 

"That reminds me we should have printing.*' 
Supt. 

••I have often thought that we need more along the art line -urt 

metal, jewelry, and pottery." 

First Member. 

"Aren't plumbing and concrete work just as important as anything 
w «• have ment ioned? 

Supt. 

"It certainly is. Now let me enumerate. Wo are looking for a man 
with twelve years of preparation back of him and one who is skilled 
in thirteen industries besides teaching. Not unreasonable at all. 
What salarj can we afford to pay?" 

Second Member. 

••It seems to me we should be a hi. • to gel such a man for $900 a year." 



Santa Barbara, t !al. 



( urtain 

Playwright: B. H. HARLACHER '08. 



/COASTING down Thirteenth Avenue was n popular sporl in the winter 
^ of 1909-10. Little boys and girls dreamed about it. and t « -^ i— . -« I their 
parents for permission i<> coast more than was good for them. 1 1 i «_• 1 1 
school students were there at all odd times during 1 1 * ■ - day, daring i<> face 
exacting teachers next day with lessons unlearned. Stout students, by 
regulation limited to free hours <>i* four to seven-thirty, occasionally over- 
stepped those hours i<> gel more rides. Older men and women, t«»>. came 
to join in the wild sport, mingling with the young people and enjoying ii 
as much. The rich and the poor, (he great and the lowly, the butcher, 

the baker, « I * « - candle stick maker, all went into the social mixtur i 

Thirteent It Avenue. 

All the sport <li<l not consist in coasting down hill. The distance up 
lull i* a mile and a quarter, and it took three quarters of an hour t.. wals 
it. Four trips was an evenings sport, a total of four minutes ride tor 
t h rec lion rs walk. 

I was a regular patron of the sli<l««. alt ho I had no sled. Arthur Durbahn, 
R. Vangilder, and other fellow students had sleds, and on the generosity 
of these I grafted. George Schefelker, hi Davis, and some of die rest of 
them made good "Spongers," t...». What difference <li<l it make what 
means were employed bo gain the end. There was an aggressiveness in 
the Stout spirit that got things. 







Bui it happened one beautiful Sunday afternoon. More people were 
out that day than usual. The sun was bright : the wind invigorating, and 
spirits ran high. The first load to start was one made up of older people 
taken from the upper society circle of the city. At tin- head, steering, 
was a young man who furnished the coasting outfit and who was con- 
sidered a reliable coaster. He proved t<> be otherwise. Not more than ;i 
hundred feet down the slope, t here happened one of those ridiculous sights 
incident to coasting, when the sled overturns and the occupants take on 



a disorder!) oonduol anumj the snow banks. Wo, who looked on, had a 
hearty laugh al the tough experience of the parly, but my turn was soon 
t<> oome. 

Another party was just ready to start, but two places on 1 1 » « - sled were 
unoccupied. I suggested to a friend of mine, n middle aged fellow, that 
we take the two vacant places, and before he could raise an objection, I 
had him on 1 1 1 « - sled and down we started. The track was exceptionally 
smooth and we attained great speed. The wind whirred about our ears. 
We made no attempt t<» answer the familiar shouts <>i" people coming up 
the bill. Suddenly we were stupefied with fear. On Seventh Street cross- 
ing, two blocks ahead of us there appeared a one»horse rig in the act <»f 
crossing our track. Not knowing anything else to do, I caught my friend 
about the neck and we rolled off, but the remainder of the load went with 
ii smash through the middle of the nutter. The result appeared awful, 
as the human beings lay scattered among 1 1 » « - wreckage, but only one was 
seriously hurt. Sin- was ji Stout student and was carried to a neighboring 
house. We, who parted from the sled before the duster, came sliding 
after on the slippery ice, but too late to get into the wreck. 

The horse w ;>s seen after** ards 
going leisurely down the street 
with ;i pair of thills dangling 
after him. The young lady who 
was Injured became well again, 
but the doctor stated that long 
passages "f James's psychology 
were recited during her subcon- 
sciousness. 

I thought President Harvey 
would have acted on the sugges- 
tion offered by the doctor's 
report . and passed a club around 
to members ol 1 1 » < - psychology 
class, but he didn't. Possiblj 
we recited better after that. 
Some of us had more time to 
devote to our lessons. I, for 
one, had taken my last ride 
down Thirteenth Avenue. 




Stevens Point , Wis. 



G. A. EUASEN, '12. 



THK I ntermediate Bohools w ere organized four years ago and have proven 
;i great success ■ They comprise the seventh, eighth, and ninth grades. 
The plan of grouping together these grades tends to break up the tradi- 
tional notions ahout the uroiipiuu of grades and High School. It seen res 

prolongation of formal education for many who would otherwise drop out 

of BOhool and it furnishes ;m opportunity tliru optional courses for heller 

ocoupationa] preparation as well as better preparation for the advanced 
high school work. Ahove all it facilitates the dosing of the gap that now 

:io-IIuinlr<.-«l-\iiU'iy-l-'oiir 



exists between the materials and methods of the grammar school and those 
of the liieh school. 

An examination of the percentage <.f attendance in the various grades 
of the Los Angeles city schools shows 1 1 • ; 1 1 moat of the pupils completing 
lite eighth grade entered the high school but thai more than three-fourth* 
of ill. -m did not enter the eleventh year. The causes of this falling out are 
many bul li<- chiefly in the Fact that the ordinary grade pupil has not been 
prepared thru his experience in the grammar school i" meet the problems 
which enter his life as ••> high school student. In the ordinary grammar 
school we have pupils of all ages from -i\ to sixteen years and if a kinder- 
garten were connected with the school a* it usually i> the ages would range 
from four t«> sixteen years. The extremes in such a case are very great and 
it will !»«• Impossible t<> have a school which will return tin- most for cither 
group, tli«- adolescent or the pre-adolescent. A school t<» l><- successful 
must be a -<>< rial unit, lint it' the extremes in tin- moral, physical, and 
intellectual development l><- great tin- institution will usuall} develop at 
..n.- and or tin- other. IT tin- school l><- managed for tin- good of children 
who need tin- motherlj care ami watohfuln< — this i- tin- case in the 
elemental? school then tin- older children are deprived of the freedom 
necessary for their beat development. The great majority of these pupils 
lacking individuality ami Initiative are not prepared for tin- freedom al- 
lowed them as members of a high school. This i- evidenced by a neglect 
of lessons, irregular attendance, and dropping out of school. In the 
Intermediate school, however, every precaution i» taken to avoid the break 
between the eighth and ninth grades. Here the transition from regular 
grade work to departmental work i* more gradual. 

Th.- restless, changing period of adolescence covers about three y<-nrs 
including usually the p.-ri<><l> of th<- seventh, eighth, and ninth grades of 
school work. In those grades the interest i- similar ami methods of dis- 
cipline should be the same for all but very different from those of the lower 
grades. Under careful guidance, children reaching out after the respon- 
sibilities of lif.-. are given an opportunity to assume them. 

Tin- work is specialized ami the general plan of organization is the same 
as that <»f a high school. The course of study has been prepared with great 
care. The following >uhj.-<!> are given: English, Mathematics, Foreign 
Languages, History, Home Economics, Wood work. Bookkeeping, Sten- 
ography, Music, Drawing an. I Applied Art. Mechanical Drawing, Penman- 
ship, Geography, Physiology, Physiography, ami Physical Training. 

Tin- underlying principles in the Home Economics course an- t.» create 
and develop individuality, efficiency, ami self-dependence, giving the 
girl a better understanding of the duties of women as producers ami as 
consumers, ami intensifying the interest in all matters pertaining to the 
home ami the extension of it* influence. 

The Intermediate school thru it- wood-working -hop offers to the boy 
double tin- amount of manual training heretofore given in tin- seventh 
ami eighth grades. In the ninth year In- i> permitted to elect the work 
if he chooses. Well selected type forms are first given ami t<> these the boy 
may add supplementary models a- his peculiar ability ami needs may 
direct. Independence, both in the form of design ami the peculiarity of 
construction as well as in the work itself, i- thus developed. The boy 
gains thru hi- work in th,- wo...i shop th<- self confidence necessars to the 



masters ol himself. To the regular bench equipment the addition of sev- 
eral wood-working machines has done much for the efficiency <>f this 
depart men1 . 

The consensus of opinion among those who have observed the Inter- 
mediate schools during the past four years, is that the new plan is re- 
sponsible for more life, more activity, and more real work than was pos- 
sible under the « > l< 1 plan. Perhaps the most encouraging feature is the 
attitude of the pupils themselves toward the school. They have not 
failed to realize the greater opportunity offered them and t hi--, has re- 
sulted in a greater desire for improvement. 

A wholesome school spirit has developed because of the varied 1 i f «* of 
1 1 1 < - school which has given every pupil a chance, in some measure at least, 
to find himself. Many have been held in school longer than would othor- 
\v i-.- been the ease. Statistics recently taken show gratifying results in 
the greatly diminishing ratio <>f failures as we proceed from the lower to 
the higher grades. While not advocated as a panacea for every educational 
ill. the Intermediate school has thus far established its superiority over 
the rigid grade system and has justified its creation. 



Los AngeleH, Cal. 



.1. A. NELSON 



'Mcttm^l ^irBinincj in thz 'Wz&i 




l^OISK. the capital of Idaho, 



ranks first in population 

among the <iti<-> of the s!at<-, and 

holds a similar position in educa- 
tional lines among the cities of the 
northwest. It lias a hiiili school 
with ;m enrollment of eleven hun- 
dred ami a forcoof foit y-fivr teach- 

ors. It has taken the initiative in 
the introduction of Vocational 
Education and Industrial Arts 
courses, ami thru 1 1 » « - efforts of a 
man as well known in the educa- 
tional world as Superintendent <•• 
s. Meek, tlms*- courses have been developed to a high degree of efficiency. 
The Manual Arts Department as ii stands today includes courses in 
Mechanical Drawing, Advanced Drafting, Machine Drawing ami Design, 
Elementary ami Advanced Architecture, Sheet Metal Drafting, Lettering 
and Show -can I Writing, Joinery, Furniture Making, Cabinet Construction, 
Wood Turning, Carpentry, Art Metal Work. Concrete Work. Mill Work. 
and Special shop Work, ami Bricklaying ami Printing « ill no doubt be added 
tin- coming year. In connection with this work in tin- High School, an 
extensive course in elementary Mechanical Drawing ami Woodworking is 
given in tin- sixth, seventh ami eighth grades, ami coping saw ami knife 
work in tin- fourth and fifth grades. 

The object in all western schools is to make this line of work as practical as 
possible and to apply it 1 « • problems of construct ion in and about t he school. 



■Ilundrcd-Ninct! 



I JK 




Since the school owns a forty acre farm in connection with iis Agriculture 
Department, this i<l«-;i of practical construction can very easily !>«• carried 
out. For example, the< larpentry class during the pasl year has constructed 
barns and out-buildings for the farm, bleachers to accommodate eighteen 
hundred people a< the school Athletic Park, dressing rooms, ticket office, 
etc. The Gabinel Making class has completely furnished the Domestic 
Science Department with tables, cabinets, and other equipment, and the 
Drawing Department n^ i 1 1 1 drawing tables, boards and lookers. They have 
also constructed a complete set <>f new benches for the woodworking shop, 
and have made the furniture for the Idaho building at the Panama Pacific 
Exposition to be held En San Francisco this summer. The Concrete class 
furnishes the sidewalks around 1 1 1 « - buildings, fence posts, hitching posts 
and the lik«- for the farm, and curbing and foundations for the running 
track and buildings at the Athletic Park. In the Architectural and Mill 
Work and other classes of the department, tin- >;un<- effort i> made to put 

tin- work «»n ;i practical h;i>i>. 

So much for the schools at Boise! No** .1 few points peculiar to western 
schools in general thai may !>«• of value t<» men in this Line of work who 
contemplate coming west .it some future time. 

It will i>«- found generally thruout tin- Rooky Mountain and Coast 
States that tins Idea of "practical application" prevails. Consequently 
the man that is to have charge of the work must !>•■ something more than 
a teacher of Joinery. He must l>«- a manager of larger thine* — a man of 
exceptional initiative ability. There Is no place in the NW>t for the 

impractical high-brow or the I k-worm! Concrete evidence of the work 

accomplished is required and visible ivmiIin are tin- things that count. 
I his means one or two good exhibits a year. 

Probably tin- first thing that ;i new man in the west "ill have to go up 
against i> th«- lack of a variety of hard woods which are so common in tin- 




Middle West, South and East, Birch and Maple are practically oul of the 
question; ;> piece of Walnut or Butternut i> ;• luxury; Quartered Oak is 
worth from $175 to $250 per thousand. Fir is the only available hardwood 
thai '•;'■< be purchased for a reasonable price, and it is difficult to gel C'<»<>«l 
results when using this for cabinet work. For this reason it is up i<» the 
man thai has the Wesl in view to learn some of the peculiarities of fir, and 
the methods <>t' working and finishing it. 

Machine Shop and Forging are nol generally developed ;■- yet. This 
i- due to the fad thai there is no call tor this kind <»t" work in the West. 
There are no foundries and machine shops of any size, and few men are 
noeded for this occupation. Construction work and irrigation projects 
are the principal Lines of activity, and consequently there i- ;■ large demand 
for carpenters and woodworkers, and men with ;■ general knowledge of 
concrete construction and architectural design. 

The Wesl is .1 l>iii field for Manual Training and Vocational Education 
and men In thai Line are in great demand. The salaries are good, and the 
advantages and opportunities offered t<> the new man in the business 

are numerous. 

W. M. PLUMMER, '12 
Boise, Idaho. H. A. CAMPION, M 

E. V. ALBRECHTSON, 11. 




Boisk Thik 



Idlio-j^s 



'ri. 



'ir|'- 



IX presenting this volume to the school the 
•*• Annunl Board has assembled thai material 
which seemed in their judgment to l><- best. Tlie 
measure of success they have attained i- for you 
to judge. We hope thai ii will not only meel with 
your approval, but thai it ■>.■>. i 1 1 remain as a pleas- 
ant memory of Stout life. 

\» thia volume goes forth we are conscious that 
there are weak places; places that could have been 
bettered; parts that could have been more com- 
plete. However, we have done our best under 1 1 1 « - 
existing circumstances and truly hope lhat the 
students will appreciate 1 1 « « • situation. 

\v <• w iah to thank the many who have con- 
tributed toour pages. To the students who served 
on «h«- calendar squad, we are especially grateful. 
Special mention Is accorded to Mrs. N'ilcs, .F. 
Edward Gilbert, Herbert Steinke, Edgar Schultz 
and others for the drawings which l!.;\.- sided us. 
We are grateful t<» the Altunni who have con- 
tributed to "in- pages. .We appreciate iln- work 
«>f Miss Phillips and Miss Gilkerson in training 
the <;i>.t for the play and also the co-operative 
spirit manifested by the cast. 

The kindly spirit shown by the city photog- 
raphers, the John and Oilier Engraving Co., and 
Tin- Jensen Printing ('«... fa recognized and ;« gen- 
erous i hank j ou extended. 

To my staff of editors, I am grateful for the 
earnest effort expended and trust that the school 
will confer upon you the credit which i- due for 
i he result you have obtained. 



CHARLES W. HYDE, 
Editor. 




: ; <m$is$f 



tNCHAVINC* •» JAMN • OlU»« INOAAVING CO. CHICAGO 
PKISS Or ThI JtMCX PAINTING CO.. MlHNtACOLI* 



u— 



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